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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/16/2005 at 07:46
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which is best I have a 7mm mag  used mostly for deer hunting now the Question wich is best to sight in the scope at is it 1 1/2 " high at 100 yrds or would i be better at 3'' high at 100 yard using a 150 grain bullet how much drop will be out at 150 yrds or 200 yrds  will both still be in the kill zone willit be high at say 5o yrds just some input before i go to the range so i know about what to expect. thanks for your input Big T

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/17/2005 at 14:09
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 There are a lot of questions in your post.  I would like to know the Manufacture of the Ammo, the velocity, the bullet being used, to give you an honest answer. What are your average hunting distances? Where are you hunting, woods, cut-overs, or fields?  The more information the better..

 

Good luck, Stubewan

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/18/2005 at 07:35
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ammo is remington150grams coreloc not sure of the velocity distance vary from 40 yrds out to about 150 yrds hunt some woods area and some old strip jobs site just wanting to know can i hold dead on and not worring about missing i have never shoot my 7mm mag I have been hunting with a 308 but i wanted a flater shooting gun with more knock down power and i like the way the 7mm feel in my hand and there some elk in my area that we can hunt with our deer tag .so give me yours idea and opion is welcome . Thanks Big T
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/18/2005 at 08:35
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I would like to know why you are aiming high? 7 mags have essentially no drop out to 300yds. A inch low setting at 100 yards would be about 1/4 to 1/2 at 200 and about dead on at 300. 50 yard shots wouldn't be a problem with any setting. At 50 yards the 308 is a better gun--at that range almost any load from a 7 mag is going to give you alot of blood shot meat, leaving a good portion of the opposite impact area all over the local fauna and flora.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/18/2005 at 15:13
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Why high well i have read some article on the internet on sighting in the 7mm and a lot of them said to set the scope 3'' high at 100yrds i thought that was quite a bit for that caliber and i just wanted to see what they are thinking this gun is new to me not done a lot of study on the 7mm. yes i agree on the 308 for shoot at 50 yrds and i feel comfort with shot at 100 yrds with the 308 but the 7mm was a gift from the better half and i was planing on using it some this deer season but i dont want the big one to get away due to mis aligment of the scope i know what the 308 will do at different distance i guess i need to shoot the 7mm and buid some trust in it . Big T
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/18/2005 at 18:29
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This is from Chuckhawks.com.

 

"If a scoped 7mm Mag. rifle is zeroed to put a 150 grain Nosler Partition bullet at a MV of 3,110 fps 2.5 inches high at 100 yards, it will hit approximately 3 inches high at 150 yards, 2.3 inches high at 200 yards, and 3 inches low at 305 yards. In other words, that load has a maximum point blank range of 305 yards (+/- 3")."

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/18/2005 at 18:30
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Here's the whole article.

 

The 7mm Remington Magnum

By Chuck Hawks


Remington introduced their 7mm Magnum in 1962. The case was created by simply necking down the .338 Winchester Magnum case (or necking up the .264 Win. Mag. case, since they are the same) to accept .284" bullets. Remington was not the first to do this, since the 7mm Weatherby Magnum had been around for well over a decade, as had several wildcat 7mm Magnums including the well regarded 7mm Sharpe & Hart. However, a new cartridge from a major manufacturer is always bigger news than a wildcat or proprietary round.

The 7mm Rem. Mag. was an immediate success, probably because it provided magnum lovers with a genuine all-around cartridge that was less punishing to shoot than the .300 Magnums. The recoil energy generated by shooting a 150 grain bullet at 3100 fps in an 8.5 pound 7mm Rem. Mag. rifle is 19.8 ft. lbs. according to the "Rifle Recoil Table." This is very similar to the recoil of the typical 8 pound .30-06 rifle shooting the same weight bullet. In fact, given the fact that magnum rifles are generaly about a half pound heavier than rifles for standard calibers like the .30-06, the recoil energy of a 7mm Magnum is very comparable to that of a .30-06 with all bullet weights. And, of course, the 7mm Magnum out ranges the .30-06 in terms of both trajectory and killing power. In addition, barrel life is reported to be longer than with the .264 Winchester Magnum, .270 Weatherby Magnum, and some of the other very high velocity small bore calibers, which have drawn criticism in this regard.

The 7mm Rem. Mag. quickly became the best selling of all the magnum calibers, number seven overall on the ammunition sales lists, and it remains so today. I don't think it is a secret that there are only three magnum calibers that are chambered in a wide variety of rifles; these are the 7mm Rem., .300 Win., and .338 Win. Of these three the 7mm Magnum is, by a considerable margin, the most pleasant to shoot.

The Remington 7mm Magnum is generally regarded as suitable for all thin-skinned game world wide, although (like the .30-06) it is marginal on game above the 600 pound class. It has been successfully used on dangerous game like leopard, jaguar, lion, tiger, and the great bears at safe ranges. It is not, however, the best choice for stopping a charge at close range. Leave that to the powerful medium and large bore rifles.

Ammunition for the 7mm Rem. Mag. is manufactured not only in North America, but also in Australia, Europe, Africa, and possibly other places. It is very widely distributed, and can be purchased in most countries where big game is hunted. The original factory loads for the 7mm Rem. Mag. were (and are) a 150 grain spitzer bullet at a MV of 3,110 fps and a ME of 3,221 ft. lbs., and a 175 grain spitzer bullet at a MV of 2,860 fps and ME of 3,178 ft. lbs. Remaining energy at 300 yards with the 150 grain bullet is 1,792 ft. lbs.; with the 175 grain bullet it is 1,956 ft. lbs.

In addition, factory loads with 139-140 grain bullets at 3,150 fps, a 154 grain bullet at 3035 fps, 160-162 grain bullets at 2,940 fps, a 165 grain bullet at 2,900 fps, and 170 grain bullets at 3018 fps have been added. This is a pretty good selection of factory loads for big game hunting. The SAAMI pressure limit for the Big 7 is 52,000 cup.

Because of the high velocity of the 7mm Remington Magnum, the 139-140 grain bullets (SD .248) are best used on medium size game like pronghorn antelope, impala, and the various deer species. The 150 grain (SD .266) to 160 grain (SD .283) spitzer bullets make excellent general purpose big game bullets for the 7mm Mag. The heavy 175 grain bullets (SD .310) are generally designed for deep penetration on big or dangerous animals like moose and the great bears. The 7mm Magnum has been widely used for Alaskan game, and for all of the African plains game.

The trajectory of 7mm Rem. Mag. factory loads with 175 grain bullets is similar to that of the .270 Winchester with a 150 grain bullet; with 150 grain bullets the 7mm Magnum's trajectory is about like a .270 with a 130 grain bullet. In other words, it shoots just as flat as a .270 Winchester and hits even harder (at both ends, of course).

If a scoped 7mm Mag. rifle is zeroed to put a 150 grain Nosler Partition bullet at a MV of 3,110 fps 2.5 inches high at 100 yards, it will hit approximately 3 inches high at 150 yards, 2.3 inches high at 200 yards, and 3 inches low at 305 yards. In other words, that load has a maximum point blank range of 305 yards (+/- 3").

Reloading for the 7mm Rem. Mag. can both save money and allow the shooter to develop accuracy loads for his particular rifle, which the big loading companies obviously cannot do. Reduced loads for practice or to reduce blast and recoil are also possible. Naturally, the slower burning powders, starting at about the burn rate of IMR 4350, are best in this big case with all bullet weights from 120 grains on up. IMR 4831 and H4831 are widely recommended powders for most big game hunting applications.

The fifth edition of the Nosler Reloading Guide reported that IMR 4831 was the most accurate powder with their 150 grain bullets. 61.0 grains of IMR 4831 behind a 150 grain bullet gave a MV of 3020 fps, and 65.0 grains of the same powder gave a MV of 3240 fps. These loads used Winchester cases and Federal 215 primers and were chronographed in a 24" barrel.

The reloader has access to some light bullets that are not factory loaded, such as the 100, 115, and 120 grain bullets intended for small animals or varmints. But the Big 7 is not a good choice for that sort of shooting, and lightly constructed bullets may not withstand the very high velocities at which they can be driven. Barnes offers their 195 grain Original bullet for those wanting something super heavy, and it can be driven at well over 2,600 fps--with some loads to nearly 2,700 fps.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/18/2005 at 19:44
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  I could not have said it better, nor sent you to a better sight. Chuck Hawks, is a great writer and a great asset to the industry.  I think that the 7 mag is a bit much for deer under 250 yards. My exerience has been great with the 7mm-08 at distances to 300 yards, However most of my hunting is 40- 150 yards, remember it's not the caliber, it's how well you can shoot it.  Also, a Hornady light mag load for your 308 would kill any Elk at reasonables distances. If you reload, try a fail safe, scirrocco, or trophy bonded bear claw.

 

Good Luck, Stubewan

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/19/2005 at 08:08
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Thanks for the infro. i am going to play with it for a while and learn the gun and different load I will keep the trusted 308 on hand for now !!!  again thanks again Big T
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/19/2005 at 15:55
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Originally posted by stubewan stubewan wrote:

  Chuck Hawks, is a great writer and a great asset to the industry.

 

The problem with Hawks is that he has never had a product that he didn't like.  No matter how many times he has to send it back to the manufacturer.  If I sent you a scope, gun, whatever, and it did not work.  You sent it back to me and I replaced with another defective model and we did this three or four times until I sent you one that worked well.  Would you tell everyone how great my products were and fail to mention how many bad units I had sent you?  Chuck would and does.  Take any of his reviews with a grain of salt.  Consumer Reports he ain't.

 

ranburr

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/22/2005 at 11:13
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Reply: ranburr

 

You know, I can agree with some things that you say, Chuck is not consumer reports.  However he does share alot of good unbiased information.  I like the way that he can found something positive about any product. I did not know that he sold products. I have simply used his sight for reference and will encourage others to do so.  I did notice that you are considered a optics professional, I would like to send folks to your website as well, for an unbiased opinion. Could you please forward me your website address.

 

Thanks Stubewan

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/22/2005 at 11:41
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I am subscribed to Chuck's website and I read his reviews regularly.  They certainly provide a lot of useful information.  However, in a few areas where I have some personal experience I certainly disagree with him, so I take his opinion with a grain or two of salt.  He generally seems to be a bit out of his depth with optics.  Well, maybe out  of his depth is not a correct way of saying this.  Let's just say that I would test them differently.  Regardless, of that his site is a good starting point when researching a particular piece.  There were some other things where I have some experience with and disagree with him on (like his take on 7.62x39 and 7.62x54R cartridges, for example, as well as nearly any formerly Eastern block creation; as much as I despise Soviet Union and everything it stood for, they had some expertise with military weapons and cartridges).

 

Well, that and various intentional and unintentional mistakes and typos annoy me.  He charges money to read his articles.  The least he could do is proofread them.

 

Ilya

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/22/2005 at 13:00
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I agree with ranburr, Chuck Hawks has never had a product that he didn't like. When I read a field test or a product review, I expect to hear the good, the bad and the ugly so I may make a well informed decision before plunking down my money.

 

I frequent his web site and read his articles.....it's a good place to get "technical information", but I do take his reviews with a grain of salt. I think it's great that the guy can find something positive to say about ALL the equipment he's tested (maybe the guy is just a flaming optimist ) but I feel that this misleads an individual that is looking for an HONEST review.

 

Just my humble opinion!

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/22/2005 at 13:24
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The cartridge reviews are my favorite part of his site. The areas I found that I disagree with him are his bias against any communist block round like koshkin already stated. I also disagree with his opinion on most 8mm (0.32) hunting rounds, as I really like the old 8mm Mauser cartridge and Chuck's opinion of it I think is wrong. And I think he overrates the 0.270 way to much, it's not a bad round but I don't think of it as a great round when it is compared to other cartridges.


Edited by TwoLaneBlackTop
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/22/2005 at 14:04
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I agree on 8mm.  I think that modern 8x57 is one of the better allround big game rounds in many way similar to 30-06.  I mostly shoot 200 grain bullets (Nosler Partition, Sierra Matchking, Speer Hot-Cor and I'll be trying Accubond soon) at 2500-2650fps depending on the bullet and the load.

 

Ilya

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