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What release is every one using?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/12/2010 at 16:46
BobC View Drop Down
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I have two Scott's that are as old as my bows I like a lot. A string release I use on my target bow and a caliper release for hunting.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/12/2010 at 18:18
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 2 fingers w/Saunders Fab Tabs.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/12/2010 at 23:22
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For target shooting, I use a Stanislawski 4 finger and Carter X-It back tension releases.  For hunting, I use a Carter Lock Jaw 2000, but occasionally use a Scott Lil Mongoose with spring trigger.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/13/2010 at 04:10
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I tried a back tension release once. The attempt resulted in the perforation of a light fixture at the indoor range I was at. I never dared try one again lol.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/13/2010 at 10:15
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Keep trying.  Your shooting will improve significantly if you do.  Back tension releases help cure and prevent target panic, an affliction that affects most archers at one time or another.  It also breaks you of trigger punching and makes you follow through the shot against the wall, since it relies solely on 'pulling through" the shot.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/13/2010 at 11:04
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I'm using and old scott that wraps around the wrist.  Been thinking about a handheld of some sort because of the inconvience of having it on all the time.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/13/2010 at 12:09
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Scott (Mongoose I believe) here. I've used it for years and it's been a goodun!
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/13/2010 at 15:12
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Originally posted by bugsNbows bugsNbows wrote:

Scott (Mongoose I believe) here. I've used it for years and it's been a goodun!
My caliper release is so old it has a buckle in stead of Velcro. My string release has Velcro.
I got the string release because the caliper release wore through and broke the serving on my target bow almost at the end of an indoor tournament in which I had the lead putting me out of the running.


Edited by BobC - July/13/2010 at 15:13
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/13/2010 at 15:43
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Have you tried a nocking loop, Bob?  I've switched to them and will never go back again.  Besides preventing wear on your serving, they provide more even thrust on your nocks, make it easier to hook up your release, and help aligh your peep.  The downside is they shorten your draw length a little, but I'm willing to live with that.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/13/2010 at 17:14
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I use a nocking loop on my hunting bow. The draw length on my target bow was as short as it would go without changing cams and I was too cheep at the time to do that. With the nocking loop the draw length was just a tad too long.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/14/2010 at 07:24
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X = 180 Y = 90 (X+Pyro)+(Y-Pyro) = ?

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Running a Scott Little Goose also. I shot fingers all my life, then when I bought the Maxxis, I decided, I love to pull a trigger on a rifle, and train myself on the trigger squeeze constantly, maybe it would improve my archery as well...... That was an understatement.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/14/2010 at 12:26
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three fingers/Damascus glove Smile

Edited by coyote95 - July/14/2010 at 16:39
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/15/2010 at 12:22
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I shoot a Scott Lil goose for hunting and my back-up is a Scott Mongoose. I have had them for a dozen or so years.............never had an issue.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/15/2010 at 20:03
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I shoot a Cobra Release, always have for last elven years now.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/15/2010 at 20:24
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OT TITAN

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Originally posted by hunterwingler hunterwingler wrote:

I shoot a Cobra Release, always have for last elven years now.

ive been shooting a cobra for 5yrs, they are cheap and reliable, on a side note.. doesnt anybody use a wynn free flight anymore??
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/15/2010 at 21:59
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Scott Wildcat.  My backup I think is a older scott double caliper model.  Would have to dig it out to make sure on that though.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/17/2010 at 06:55
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Fletcher 3-D, you can set the trigger just like a rifle for weight and it is very consistant. Plus after yrs of use the wrist strap can be replaced for less than a new release.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/17/2010 at 07:32
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 "doesnt anybody use a wynn free flight anymore??"
 
 Yea,pyro.  My son uses the "shoot on release" model which seems to have been discontinued.  I've messed with it some and like it alot.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/17/2010 at 08:28
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Can anyone explain how the back release works? What triggers the release? Is there risk of a release before you are set?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/17/2010 at 10:11
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 I got to wondering the same thing so went on a search and found this.
 
 
From “Selling Back Tension Release Aids,” by Larry Wise, ArrowTrade Magazine, March 2004

Begin learning the release with a training aid, not a bow.

Set the release timing to heavy so your shooter has to work hard to activate the release.

Use a rope loop with them to be sure they have back tension that launches the loop several feet out of their hand.

Check for wrist or finger movement, there should be none with back tension. The rhomboid muscles in your back are the workers in this exercise.

All fingers should be held with equal tightness on the release and not relaxed.
Their wrist should be relaxed and straight.

Two weeks on the training aid is not too long.

Switch to the bow but do not use a sight or a target face. Stand close to the target butt.

Shoot 15 to 20 shots each session. Two weeks is not too long to do this either.

Begin every practice with 15 - 20 blank bale shots before shooting any score on a target face.

End every practice with 8 - 10 blank bale shots. Never aim during the blank bale shooting, think about how it feels only.

Six months is not too long to follow this routine.

I called Jim Bath of Kansas to get his thoughts on release shooting. He feels this way, “Too many shooters using the back tension release are twisting their wrist or their fingers to set it off and they’re not getting the results they want because of that.” I agree, that’s why it’s important to get started properly. I also liked what Jim had to say about switching to the back tension style, “You don’t ‘try’ a back tension release to see if you like it, you commit to it for the long term. “ In other words, you can’t get this technique at the McDonald’s drive-thru window. You really have to work at it.

Learning to Shoot a Back Tension Release Aid
Using a six foot piece of 1/8 th inch nylon rope, tie the two ends together to form a loop
equal in length to your bow’s draw length.

Place one end of the loop around your bow hand as shown while hooking your back tension release to the other end as you would hook it to your bowstring. Now the loop acts as your bow and you can reproduce your full draw body position without drawing the bow and any threat of bodily harm. Adjust the length of the rope to match your bow’s draw length so that your feel comfortable. In other words, adjust it to match your full draw body position. That means your shoulders must be level, your dominant-side scapula in position to begin back tension, drawing elbow slightly raised above level and your bow arm extended to allow the force of your tension to be carried by bone structure.

Body position is all-important to form, so even with this rope, practice it right.

Once you’re in proper position you need to relax your drawing-side arm muscles.

Remember that this is easiest when your draw-wrist is kept straight and forearm muscles are relaxed. Also, consistent archery form minimizes muscle and maximizes skeleton.
Now is the time to start tightening your draw-side rhomboids. As they tighten, you will feel your arm, elbow, release hand and back tension release move, too. Eventually, the back tension release will release the rope loop and the bowstring.

Figure 1: Use the rope loop to simulate your bow. Adjust it to the right draw length, set the release-timing medium to heavy and practice back tension.

BE PATIENT: DO NOT RUSH THIS PROCESS!
If your back tension release goes off too quickly set it heavier. Learn to use it set heavy so you have to expend lots of energy and time to get it to go off. Working hard at this stage will get you accustomed to waiting for the release to do its magic. Even if your personality is such that you can’t stand waiting, train yourself to wait. Waiting is a habit you can learn. When you are executing with back tension properly the rope loop will launch four or five feet outward. If, when released, it just hangs around your bow hand then you’re not using any tension and simply turning the release handle with your wrist or fingers. When you get it right, the cord will launch outward several yards. Learn how it’s done and how it feels in your back. Keep doing it until it is transferred to your subconscious.

This rope and the back tension release can be used anywhere, anytime. Practice with it in your office, living room, and basement, on business trips or anywhere you are. Use it for maybe 20 shots at a time. More shots are not necessary but more practice sessions are. Practice four or five times a day because frequent review promotes long-term retention of the skill being practiced. These frequent sessions will also help with muscle conditioning and mental control. Be sure to review body position with each practice session.

Selecting a Release
The back tension release has been around since the early 1970’s when Mel Stanislawski invented it. I started using one in 1977 and haven’t been able to put it down since. On the urging of a friend I borrowed his “Stan” for a test run; he never got it back.

From the first shot I knew I was a better archer. With my Stanislawski the arrow groups were good and got better and better until I was shooting well from all distances. My first indoor scores that winter were over 590 on the 40cm FITA target and I was impressed with how this release aid had changed me. I’ve used other releases but I keep going back to the back tension release. With it I can maintain my form. Without it I quickly fall into a lazy mode with my back tension and the groups in the target get bigger.

Many back tension releases are available from several manufacturers. Models for two, three, and four fingers are shown. I know all the manufacturers personally and have tried all of these products and urge you to try them in an effort to find the one that best fits your hand and improves your consistency.

Over the years I’ve had the most success with a two-finger model but a three or four finger model may better serve you.

Safe Draw
If you’re concerned about your release going off on the draw stroke then try a release with a safety of some kind. The safety prevents the release from discharging during the draw stroke. At full draw you can press a button to disconnect the safety and from that point on you can use your back tension to activate the release. These releases really take the worry out of drawing a back tension release. No matter what model you choose keep hand position in mind. You must be able to hold the release while keeping your large knuckles and wrist straight. This is the best way to ensure that your forearm muscles are relaxed during the shot.

Using the Back Tension Release with a Bow
When you’re ready to use your back tension release with your bow, begin at close range, say 5 yards, no target and no sight. Your goal is to get the bow to full draw position, then aim and reproduce the shot form that you’ve been practicing with the rope loop. Don’t set the release light, heavy is better for training. You know when you’re cheating so don’t. Only perfect practice makes perfect.

Frequent short practice sessions each day are, again, the best way to train. Do this for 20 days; it takes 20 days to build a habit. The goal of each session is to shoot ten to fifteen shots with perfect form and execution.

In time, maybe two weeks, you’ll be ready for a sight and a target. Don’t rush to get to them, remain patient and focus on the feel of your body as it sets off the release. Add the sight and a target and shoot at close range. Practice often during the day and only for 10 to 15 shots.

Once again your goal with this practice is to
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/20/2010 at 23:47
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Scott Little Goose and a similiar Scott (Model eludes memory right now) that has a hook instead.  Makes it easier to go when hunting.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/21/2010 at 18:53
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Originally posted by Sgt. D Sgt. D wrote:

Can anyone explain how the back release works? What triggers the release? Is there risk of a release before you are set?
 
There are various different triggering mechanisms used in back tension releases.  The most common, as used on the "Stanislawski" or "Stan" as was discussed in the above post, works on the natural pivoting motion of your hand as you "pull through" the shot against the wall of the bow at full draw.  It has a half moon shaped disk that a sear engages.  The sear is connected to a linkage that holds the hook or rope used to connect to the bow string or nocking loop.  As you are applying back tension, the release pivots slightly in your hand, causing the sear to rotate around the half moon disk until it clears the radius of the half moon, triggering the release.  Since you are using the large muscle groups in your back rather than your trigger finger to release the bow, you can rid yourself of bad habits like punching a trigger, and the release takes you by surprise.  You don't notice the release pivoting and don't anticipate the shot -- provided you are using the release correctly, so you can concentrate solely on aiming and maintaining proper shooting form.  This also encourages follow-through and you're less likely to tighten your grip on the bow at the moment of release, which torques the bow.
 
Other back tension releases trigger by a knob that presses against the root of your thumb as the release pivots when you are applying back pressure against the draw stops.  There are other designs as well, but all basically operate on the natural pivot motion of the release as you apply back tension.

They can be difficult to get used to at first, and yes, you will have some premature releases every now and then until you master the release, but the advantages far outweigh the learning curve. 
 
Using a back tension release is the best sure-fire way of curing target panic and improving your shooting.  Target panic will affect most archers to some degree at one time or another.  It's difficult to break bad habits once you get used to punching a trigger.  Back tension releases are the prescription for this.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/29/2010 at 13:30
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I have a Scott Sabertooth, quit a good trigger in my opinion

Regard Chris
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/30/2010 at 21:37
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I'm like you in that I like my old Scott's. A few years back I tried one of their other offerings called the "Little Goose" and since then I have found it hard to put down.

It is accentual the same as a full size Scott in shape and function except in a mini size. The reason that I fancy it so is that It is so small and is fastened to the wrist band with a thin nylon belt that can be folded under the wrist strap out of the way until needed.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/28/2010 at 12:25
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still using the old fletch hunter

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