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What about that sweet spot?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/27/2007 at 10:34
windstrings View Drop Down
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Can someone elaborate on the "sweet spot" I've heard about?

I've seem a couple of posts about how the Swarovski's have a large sweet spot?
I'm assuming that means more of the center of the lens is in perfect focus.

If thats true, how do they pull it off?

Knowing the basic structure of a lens, that tells me there is a very small "sweet spot" where the pinpoint focus is achieved. From my years of playing with a magnifying glass, I remember the focal point or dot is very tiny on that small of or that "mm size" of a lens.

Its seems it would take a great deal of precision to spread that "sweet spot" out over a larger area and still maintain perfect clarity..... especially towards the edges of the lenses where clarity is never perfect, but obviously better in some lenses than others.


Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 16:13
windstrings View Drop Down
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Humm.. I had a reply on this topic and I replied back and now much of my question has been deleted?

My original question was inquiring as to whether this is a manufacture "preference" to fashion a lens this way  or is it something all manufacturers strive to achieve?

I want to know if Swarovski is the "best" at making a large sweet spot or is this just their preference and other  manufacturers choose different parameters to satisfy and focus their expertise at?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 16:40
ND2000 View Drop Down
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It is manufacturer preference.  For instance, Swarovski has the largest sweet spot and best depth of field, so their binoculars are generally the most pleasing to look through over extended periods of time.  Zeiss has much smaller swet spot but the color rendition is more accurate and resolution is better in the center. 
 
There are no secrets when it comes to optics, IMO.  What is produced by each manufacturer is an optimization exercise taking all the various trade-offs into consideration.
 
ND2000
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 18:00
windstrings View Drop Down
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That makes sense to me, but I've never heard it voiced before.
I've always thought of preferences as being slants towards certain chromatic flavors or needs, weight, etc.. but it does appear they all have the same demons to fight against.. some preferences are easier to obtain than others I'm sure.

To me, it seems like getting a lens to show clarity over a larger surface than merely the focal point... or in essence "spreading" out the focal point and still maintain clarity.. would be quite a challenge.

I agree about the ease of use over time... any time the eye sees an area thats not in focus, it tries to make corrections.. hence eye fatigue.

Not knowing any more than I do.. I would thing that long range spotting scopes. telecopes... and even rifle scopes would advantage from center clarity, whereas binoculars that are routinely used to "scan" the horizon would be better suited for a wider sweet spot.

With my naked eye, I can see the differences in sweet spots, but as far as center clarity.... I still can't seem to see or find another brand that has better center clarity as the swarovski... it seems they cover both bases pretty good.
I only spent about 3 hours comparing them all and that was mostly indoors against an eyechart about 40 yards away... but outdoors at dusk is the real test of any bino IMO.

Crystal clarity seems to bring the object even closer as the brain is tricked because it normally never gets that clarity except with close objects.

Some peoples eyes may be trained better than mine.

I appreciate your reply....  these type of things are good to understand so a buyer can make an informed decision and not have remorse later on because he didn't know what his real needs were as compared to the best equipment to suit that need.

We all would like to have our cake and eat it too.. the challenge is the best way to do that.
Sometimes the only solution is to buy more than one pair to cover all bases.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/03/2008 at 07:16
windstrings View Drop Down
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I've given this some more thought while driving to work today......

Swarovski is actually trying to accomoplish something that even the human eyeball cannot acheieve.

We are used to only have our very center field of view in perfect focus... all the rest of our "Field of view" is actually considered and used for "peripheral vision".

Thats the area whereas we catch something in the corner of our eye thats moving or flashes enough to catch our attention and then we pan our vision to that point so the our center view can actually focus directly upon it to process that information accurately.

It seems most glasses, telescopes and the like are set to mimic the human eyeball in that fashion.
The "peripheral vision" of a glass (as being that area not in perfect enough focus) is used to find our way till we spot what we "really" want to view.

Swarovski is attempting to make a glass that has less peripheal vision whereas you can actually see more area thats in focus without having to actually pan or move the binocular to do it!

Of course the  nature of our eyeball is still fixed and so we have to move our eye just a bit as we look thorugh the bino that doesn't necessary have to move per se, but its so nice when we can leave the bino fixed and still see "clearly" much of the field of view.

I would think that would be a preference even with spotting scopes.

How many times have you seen something by surprise that was not directly in the center of your FOV?...

Not only does it make the world seem more natural, but it's obviously more pleasing to the eye as our eye looks "as it were" into another eye for assistance into the distance.
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