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Swimming upstream.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/18/2009 at 13:40
Al Nyhus View Drop Down
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     After an amout of futzin', fiddlin', cipherin', knob twirlin', and estimatin' with these things....a gnawing suspicion has become quite clear.
 
    The best MilDot setup is:  A standard-ish reticle in the scope and a laser rangefinder in your shirt pocket. Wink 
 
     Ducking for cover, here.......Peeker
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/18/2009 at 13:51
RONK View Drop Down
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 Sure, until you battery goes dead...
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/18/2009 at 13:55
Rancid Coolaid View Drop Down
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Absolutely nothing beats a strong knowledge of your ballistics and your reticle; everything else is disaster waiting to happen.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/18/2009 at 14:01
Monster View Drop Down
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Originally posted by Al Nyhus Al Nyhus wrote:

     After an amout of futzin', fiddlin', cipherin', knob twirlin', and estimatin' with these things....a gnawing suspicion has become quite clear.
The best MilDot setup is:  A standard-ish reticle in the scope and a laser rangefinder in your shirt pocket. Wink 


I am going to agree with this, with my focus on a hunting scope. I would go with a duplex type reticle rather than a mil-dot for hunting applications.

Edited to add that I do like learning about the mil-dot and playing with one at the range....


Edited by Monster - April/18/2009 at 14:02
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/18/2009 at 14:05
billyburl2 View Drop Down
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A laser sure does make things simple. But they do fail, and sometimes when it really counts. So, is it easy being proficient with a mil type reticle? Not really, but I personally believe it is worth my time and effort.



Edited by billyburl2 - April/18/2009 at 14:07
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/18/2009 at 14:23
trigger29 View Drop Down
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X = 180 Y = 90 (X+Pyro)+(Y-Pyro) = ?

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My solution is a Geovid to lazer my target, and a Rapid-Z reticle, so when my lazer fails I can range it with the reticle. I practice with both just to be sure. Never had my lazer not work, and it gets a fresh battery before every hunting trip, but you just never know.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/18/2009 at 14:44
rifle looney View Drop Down
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What if What if! life is full of surprises the odds my battery in my ranger be dead about the same as forgetting your ammo at home fat chance in my case. and if by some reason well then get closer or move on that's hunting.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/18/2009 at 18:15
huff143 View Drop Down
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Originally posted by rifle looney rifle looney wrote:

What if What if! life is full of surprises the odds my battery in my ranger be dead about the same as forgetting your ammo at home fat chance in my case. and if by some reason well then get closer or move on that's hunting.
 
Amen!Excellent  I range it and dial it.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/19/2009 at 01:19
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The way I've come to understand it, a rangefinder, a range-verified drop chart and target knobs to get you there are the most reliable method. But I try to learn every way I can to estimate distance and wind. Even when I'm just out walking I've made it a habit to guess how far away some object is, then verify it later to see if I'm close. I was all excited about having a mil-dot reticle when I first read about how you can use one to figure range. But then I came across some postings that pointed out that guessing wrong by an inch or two on a game animal could result in a miss or poor shot placement. So out came the wallet - again - for a rangefinder to go with it. I figure if the battery actually died on my rangefinder I could always try to close to less than 300 yards. My zero is 250 yards and anything out to 300 will be inside an 8" trajectory.

Edited by jonoMT - April/19/2009 at 01:20
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/19/2009 at 06:39
medic52 View Drop Down
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Yo ever try to hold a laser on a PD around 200 yards............They work great if you have something you can range. I like mil-dot for varmint and a good ole regular reticlue for hunting. My hunting zero is 200 yards........
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/19/2009 at 08:04
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
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even with known size targets, ranging with mil-dot, tmr, moa, mil bars still gives an error around 5% of the range estimate. variances in target size causes more compounded problems. Even when you range it with electronics -you still have to have the drop dope, ready to go.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/19/2009 at 09:35
John Barsness View Drop Down
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The problem with lasers is not the battery going as much as gettng an accurate reading. This is easy most of the time, with today's lasers, but on rare occasions it isn't--and that's when it's handy to know how to use a reticle for ranging. I have had to do this more than once on various big game adventures, and the knowledge really does help. It also can help to be able to double-check the laser reading with the reticle.

There is also the question of time. Last fall I killed a really good mule deer buck after ranging him with a dot-reticle scope, and never could have done it if I'd even tried put a laser on him. He was pushed out of some aspens by some other hunters, and when I first saw him he was almost 300 yards out in the sagebrush and trotting away. By the time he slowed down enough for a shot (a slow walk) he was about to disappear into a deep draw--and I shot him then.

There was at MOST 10 seconds to shoot from the time I first saw him, just enough time to get on him, use the reticle to estimate range as somewhere beyond 350 but not 400 yards, and put the correct dot on the front edge of his chest. (The bullet took out the top of his heart, by the way, but I would have been happy with any solid chest cavity hit.) I probably could have gotten a laser reading, but there wouldn't have been time to shoot afterward--and maybe I couldn't have gotten a reading in that amount of time.  Only afterward did a friend laser the shot at 360 yards. That isn't a vast distance with today's equipment, but still long enough to cause problems if you don't have a good idea of the range.
 
It doesn't really matter if you use mil-dots or whatever to estimate range, as long as you know what the reticle subtends and the approximate size of the animal. The method starts to run out of accuracy at around 500 yards, due to several factors, but it can also save the day if a laser reading isn't possible. The easiest way to use it is to figure out just how the animal you're hunting "fits" the reticle BEFORE you go hunting, so there's no necessity for hurry-up math in your head. But for big game hunting it does work, within it's limits, because a big mule deer (as an example) has a vital area of at least 10". We don't need to hit the precise hair, just somewhere in the middle of his chest.
 
 
 
 
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