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scopes on big bores

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/11/2005 at 22:48
Daniel View Drop Down
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I purchased a 416 rem mag that came w/ a swaro 1.25 - 4 x 24 illum ret scope on it.  I shot it for the first time and the scope repeatedly hit my shooting goggles.  The scope did not hit me hard and since the scope has a springy ocular bell, it was just annoying, but I know it has to be close to hitting me pretty hard.  Does anyone have experience with scopes on these big bores, and if so do you have any tips for scope mounting or shooting these guns w/ scopes.  I feel like the scope is a little too far forward, I have to lean my head forward a little to get the full view in the scope.  Are you better off to have the scope mounted a little too much forward and stretch to reach it, or is it better (as far as recoil is controlled) to pull it back to where you are not leaning forward? 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/11/2005 at 23:10
Acenturian View Drop Down
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416 Remnington Mag  ouch.... I had a buddy that shot one and he said the thing kicked the _ out of him.  But then again the caliber  is designed to stop stuff the size of Peterbilts with teeth and claws LOL. 

 

Hopefully some of the optics experts will chim in on what is the best way a scope should be mounted.  If you go to the store here on the forum you can look up scope stats of different brands.  For a hard kicker you want to have a scope with plenty of eye relief.  Burris has a great reputation of making a very solid scope and with the heavy recoil you will want something that stays on target shot after shot. 

 

Funny story>  My dad has one of his uncles 300 something H&H mag every time my dad shot it he looked like he went a boxing with the heavy weight champ.  He couldnt figure it out since his uncle was about 5 inches shorter then him (my size) and later his uncle bought a 458 mag.  Well closer inspection of the gun showed the stock was cut down for his uncle which would explain why the scope bit my dad. LOL

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/12/2005 at 01:49
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When you lean forward it takes your forehead (and eyebrows) that much closer to the scope.  Some people are natural stock crawlers though (like me) and tend to be sensitive to scope eye relief.

Generally, you want to figure out what position is most comofrtable for you.  Try to quickly grab the rifle (unloaded, of course) and see where your head ends up, then adjust the scope to be at the right spot.  If the stock does not fit you, well, that's a bigger problem since on something that kicks that hard every  little stock fit problem will be magnified.

Ilya
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/12/2005 at 10:17
Roy Finn View Drop Down
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If it were me, I would go to low powered variable from Leupold such as there 1.5-5 or the 1.75-6 VX lll which have 4-5 inches of eye relief at the low end to approx. 4 inches on the top end. If you try to fool around with the scope mounting it will lead to a unnatural shooting position which will lead to poor marksmanship. You don't want  to worry about recoil when pursuing the critters that gun was intended for.  Also, most custom gunsmiths use the Leupold low power variables on the dangerous game rifles they produce due to their proven ability to withstand the punishment(recoil) they generate.Just my 2 cents worth. 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/12/2005 at 10:56
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
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Heavies have their own mounting problems. Benching for group size is bore sighting is at the top of the list. Shooters crawl the stock because the length of pull and the cast off of the stock are wrong. To get the correct eye relief it is usually necessary to "tilt" the scope to the horizon. To do it right a heavies stock should be fit to the shooter just like a good trap stock. Straight line stocks like an AR were designed to do away with this by using a "heads up" high sight mounting position. This is not possible on a heavy and the check should be welded as much as possible to a good wide check shelf of the stock. A heavies scope should be mounted as far forward as possible, then some- it has nothing to do with the scope it has to to with working the bolt while the gun is still shouldered. This and a lot of practice will keep you from "short stroking" which could lead to your untimely demise. The 1X4 VII leo IS the standard, although I use a 2X7 compact Leo on my Safari Win 416. I only use it on 7x when a 25 lb bag of shot is over the barrel for grouping purposes. I also suggest a set of quick release mounts such as Leo that are posts, (no windage adjustment in the rear), And a Very good set of iron sights. I recommend N.E.C.G. Express sights. (Dakota's work well also). Hits on a 5 gal. gas can at 200 yds offhand with the iron sights should be your goal while you practice operating the bolt smoothly.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/12/2005 at 12:41
Daniel View Drop Down
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Thanks for the advice.  I did go through the swfa website and compare eye relief between my scope and the leo's and the leo's give about 1/2 in. more relief.  The scope came on the rifle, if I had bought the scope separate I would have bought the leo since I am a die hard fan.  I don't know how the measure the eye relief on the swaro b/c of the springy ocular bell.  If they measure to the lense itself, well, there is about half an inch from the very back edge of the springy part to the glass.  If they measure to the vary back part, (the springy part) then the eye relief to the lense would be about the same as the leupold.  It does have quick detach mounts, and I did sight it in open sighted before moving to the scope.  The stock seems to fit me pretty good.  Who would I take it to to have the stock checked for proper fit?  Can a gunsmith do that?  I live in the houston area.  Thanks again.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/12/2005 at 15:08
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If you're shooting off a bench, most people tend to put themselves in position to get whacked when they lean into the scope.  Try shooting off a rest while standing.  It puts you in a natural shooting position and is much more comfortable for sighting in, as you can absorb recoil.  The standing method is preferred in Africa, I understand.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/13/2005 at 14:12
Roy Finn View Drop Down
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Probably the easiest thing to do if you don't know somebody already is to go to a local trap/skeet range and ask around as to who a good local gunsmith would be so that you could be properly fit. That is if that is really needed. There is allot involved if major adjustments are needed such as stock bending which can be costly. This would be the worst case scenario. It doesn't sound like all ofthis would be necessary, though. Either way, it is fixable.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/15/2005 at 14:30
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I think I would be inclined to put on an aimpoint, or a 1x burris short mag,  and give myself more eye releif.

 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/17/2005 at 11:56
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My 2 cents: When you are looking thru the scope you should not be stretching your neck to get the right sight picture.  If you do then the scope is too far forward.  Many rifles have the scopes too far forward because that's how the scope will end up if you just mount it and center it between the rings (especially on long actions).  It also looks better than with the back of the scope hanging out past the cocking piece, but it is not right.  Also, stretching your neck forward will make operating the bolt from the shoulder more difficult as your face is closer to the cocking piece.

I looked up the specs on the SV 1.25 variable and they show an eye relief of 80mm (3.15").  That's not a lot for a 416.  You should consider replacing it with a scope with more eye relief.  I cannot speak for anyone else, but I would have a hard time shooting any rifle accurately if getting wacked in the eye was always in the back of my mind whenever I went to shoot it.  There are plenty of choices out there, depending on what you want to spend.  If you go with a variable then see what the eye relief is at maximum magnification.  For a DG rifle many people prefer a low power fixed scope.  When you choose a scope try to plan on what mounts to use at the same time.  You may have to change the mounts.  Many of the low-powered scopes are pretty short and you may need an extension (front) base to get the scope far enough rearward.

If you really want to stay with the SV you may want to consider adding a good muzzle brake.  Depending on how hard you are getting hit, it may reduce recoil enough to prevent contact. 
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