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Sako 85 vs. Weatherby Mark V

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/11/2007 at 22:29
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Okay, I've written several times that I like the Sako 85 more than the Weatherby Mark V and some other rifles because of their safeties and triggers.  But as I've stated I have VERY little experience with the Magnum Mark V action.  Tell me why you guys like them better than the Sako.  And don't hold back.  You ain't gonna hurt my feelin's.

 

timber



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/12/2007 at 10:25
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Keep in mind that any answer you're likely to receive here will naturally be very subjective, as we all have our individual preferences which are usually neither right nor wrong.

 

I personally am not a big fan of the Mark V and Weatherby's in general, mainly because I don't like the Weatherby stock style at all -- it has a very 1970's "dated" look to me, and is unnecessarily chunky, with squared-off lines and flat surfaces that don't feel "right" in my hands.  The Mark V carries more weight than it really needs to for standard calibers, though that isn't necessarily a bad thing for the harder kicking chamberings.  I do like aspects of the Mark V action, namely the overall quality and smoothness of bolt operation.  Like you, I don't like the trigger (mainly because there aren't very many aftermarket triggers available for it), and I absolutely detest the safety.

 

I am a big fan of Sako actions, both old and new.  Like the MK V, the 75 and new 85 are also a very smooth operating, well made actions.  The Sako has the same short bolt throw as the MK V, and 3 lugs are just as strong as 6 or 9, yet are more likely to all evenly bear the loads from firing.  I like the changes Sako made to the 85, namely CRF and the new classic style stock shape with shadowline cheekpiece.  From what I've seen, it appears to me that Sako wood quality has declined over the years for whatever reason, so I wouldn't buy one sight unseen, as I've seen many Sakos with extremely plain wood and yet some with really nice wood.  I got lucky with my 75 in that it does have quite pretty wood figure in the butt portion of the stock.  I'm definitely fond of Sako triggers, which are always very crisp and can be adjusted to a reasonably light pull weight.  While I think the 75/85 safety is an improvement over the previous Sako safeties, I still wouldn't consider it my favorite design.  I like the Winchester 70 style 3-position safety the best.  I don't like the Sako tapered dovetail grooves because it limits your choices in scope mounts as well as mount positioning on the rifle, though Talley mounts for Sako have worked well for me.

 

Basically most actions have at least 1 design feature that I like, and it would be difficult to incorporate all the "best" features into one action because some features cannot coexist together on the same rifle.

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Rifledude makes some very good points.  It really is a subjective issue.  Both the Sako and Wby. are two of the finest production rifles made and it really is a matter of choice regarding aesthetics and those other issues he brings up.  I personally have never handled an 85, but have had some experience with the 75, albeit limited.  I have no problems with the safety on the Wby.  All I want in a safety personally, is it to be on or off and I do not mind if the bolt is locked in place.  In fact, in some cases that maybe a positive, if you are in the woods and do not want the bolt accidently bumped open.  But, again it is all personal preference.  You also have to consider the chamberings.  Both manufactures offer some cross over into standard chambering (Wby.) and Wby. calibers (Sako), at least the last time I checked for Sako.  Sako has a great reputation for accuracy with hammer forged barrels, while many Wby. barrels are button rifled.  I like the Wby. look, Rifledude does not, do you?  I wrote Ed Weatherby and e-mail about bringing out more different wood styles, such as matte, as they used to, as well as some benchrest actions.  My reply, was that was a possibility for the former, but they really wanted to remain a producer of hunting rifles.  Bottom line.  Both fine rifles.  Now you have to make a choice and you will not be wrong either way.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/12/2007 at 16:23
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I have 3 Mark V's  (  Deluxe, custom shop fluted barrel Sporter with satin stock, and stainless in a B&C stock ) and lovem'''     I don't have or have shot either Sako action, but know those that do and they lovem' also....I have to agree with Dolphin comments that ya can't go wrong either way

Edited by martin3175
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/12/2007 at 20:53
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i dont know jack about actions, but i will disagree with ted for once in my life and say i kinda like the way weatherby's stock looks, it fits me very nicely and i think the next time i buy a new rifle it will be a weatherby. i dont have any real experience with either actions, as i have never fired a rifle made by  either company, but i will offer this, i dont think either action is a piece of sh*t, face it these names have been in business for many years, and they both make a damn nice rifle either way you look at it, i would have to save my sheckels for many many months maybe even a year to afford a mkv or a sako85 actioned rifle, if i wasnt going to buy a  magnum caliber i would buy a sako 85 right now, but if i wanted a magnum i think i would buy a weatherby, my saying is this if you buy a weatherby dont waste you money by buying a non weatherby caliber.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/13/2007 at 00:18
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Thanks guys.  I'm going to try to put together a list of both rifles' features so we can objectively compare the two.  They really seem to be quite different in many respects.  To me Weatherby Magnums seem to favor ultra long shots and the newer Sako 85 feels more like a medium range rifle. For now I'd like to add a few thoughts to what has already been said. 

 

I'm paraphrasing but it's been said 'as long as you're comparing quality pieces the fit to the shooter may be the most important of all in choosing a rifle (shotgun, etc)'.  No doubt both Weatherby and Sako are very high 'quality'.  So in my opinion they are comparable and I like them both.  I don't mean to denigrate the Weatherby because I like a few things better about the Sako.

 

RifleDude said: The Mark V carries more weight than it really needs to for standard calibers, though that isn't necessarily a bad thing for the harder kicking chamberings.  I do like aspects of the Mark V action, namely the overall quality and smoothness of bolt operation. 

 

I like the added weight of the Weatherby magnums and think the lighter Sako 85 is not as suited for magnum calibers.  In fact my biggest criticisim of the new Sako is the trimmed down straight stock, especially the buttstock/recoil pad.  I like the look but you really feel the recoil.  I think others here have agreed with this sentiment.  If you're thinking about one handle it first - I didn't and although I would have probably bought it anyway it sure would have given me pause.  I think Weatherby's monte carlo stock is known for handling heavy recoil well.

 

RifleDude said:  From what I've seen, it appears to me that Sako wood quality has declined over the years for whatever reason, so I wouldn't buy one sight unseen, as I've seen many Sakos with extremely plain wood and yet some with really nice wood.

 

This may be true but I couldn't afford a Sako for a long time and didn't really follow them.  Mine is pretty nice for a production rifle but I really like the oil finish and I don't mean polyurethane.  Sako recommends 100% tung oil occasionally to 'refresh' the finish.  This is 'old school' and I love it.  In the hands it feels like real wood and should take on a patina with age.

 

RifleDude said:  I don't like the Sako tapered dovetail grooves because it limits your choices in scope mounts as well as mount positioning on the rifle.

 

Right on.  To me the worst aspect of the rifle by far.  I know all the arguments about how scope bases can't be shot loose because recoil actually 'tightens' the bases.  Still, they are a pain and really limit the choice of scope mounts.  If you're listening Sako, when you come out with the 95 someday, consider something like the Icon's integrated Weaver base.

 

Dolphin said:  I have no problems with the safety on the Wby.  All I want in a safety personally, is it to be on or off and I do not mind if the bolt is locked in place.  In fact, in some cases that maybe a positive, if you are in the woods and do not want the bolt accidently bumped open.

 

I said elsewhere this is my least favorite thing about the Weatherby and hope the scaled up magnum (9-lug) version is better than my standard (6-lug) action Weatherby safeties.  (I've never owned a magnum Weatherby).  I also screwed up by trying to lower the trigger pull weight of my standard actions too much.  This made the trigger trip (dry fire) when taking the safety off.  This only happened on one of my three Weatherbys and may have been an anomaly.  I shouldn't have made a blanket statement about these safeties/triggers.  I did call Weatherby and was told the mininum weight is about 3#'s.  This is really low enough for most people, especially considering Weatherby's are for the most part dedicated hunting pieces.  My preference for 2.5#'s is really splitting hairs here.

 

As to the locking bolt feature this is found on both Weatherby's and Sako's.  With Weatherby Mark V's, like the Browning A-Bolt, Tikka, and others, the safety must be off to load or unload the rifle.  Sako, the new Icon, Model 70's (and perhaps others) have the capability to load and unload with the safety on.  I really like this feature.

 

Edit: Forgot about the Model 70's wing safety so I added it.  Also, made a mistake about saying you can load a Sako and others with the safety on and bolt locked.  What was I thinking?

 

Dolphin said:  I like the Wby. look, Rifledude does not, do you?  I wrote Ed Weatherby and e-mail about bringing out more different wood styles, such as matte, as they used to, as well as some benchrest actions.  My reply, was that was a possibility for the former, but they really wanted to remain a producer of hunting rifles. 

 

You've done a lot of other shooters/hunters a favor by doing this and I totally agree.  A lot of folks hate the shiny look.  I do have to admit that it looks sexy on a wood Mark V.  Have you guys seen the picture on Weatherby's website of the Ultramark?  Wow!  But lets hope one day they'll do a Mark V in a straight stock and/or a matte finish, especially true oil.

 

pyro6999 said:   if i wasnt going to buy a  magnum caliber i would buy a sako 85 right now, but if i wanted a magnum i think i would buy a weatherby, my saying is this if you buy a weatherby dont waste you money by buying a non weatherby caliber.

 

Agreed as I said above.  Just my opinion but the new Sako 85 stock is too trim for a magnum caliber.  Others may disagree.  I am moderately sensitive to recoil.

 

Let me relate a short story about Weatherby that will really date me.  I've lived in the southern US most of my life.  When I was in high school a couple of my hunting buddies and I went out shooting one day.  A girlfriend of ours came along - what a cool chick - her father did the whole Africa bit.  We drove out in one of the guys VW vans.  After shooting a few rifles she pulls one of her father's rifles out of a leather case, a beautiful wood Weatherby Mark V 300.  It was as if she had pulled out the sword of Damocles, so scary, dangerous, deadly, and mesmerizing it was, gleaming in the sun.  In my circle of friends it was the ultimate hunting rifle.  It was my first time seeing a Weatherby let alone handling one, truly breathtaking to a small town boy like me.  I was transfixed and smitten.

 

One by one we preceded to fire the piece.  We had opened up the huge 'moon roof' and stood up inside the van so that we were about shoulder level with the opening.  One of the guys was shooting 3-400 yards across a huge flat open swamp at some large white birds that seemed oblivious to what he was doing.  I know I know, irresponsible.  Anyway, finally, after one of the guys had hit and partially damaged the base of a pine tree limb perhaps a couple of hundred yards away, he handed me the rifle.  So I laid it over the roof, took aim at the same tree limb, and placed my finger on the trigger.  I was surprised when it went off and was thrilled when the limb fell.  Okay, it wasn't a great shot, but the sheer energy of the bullet at the base of the tree limb did the job.  Everyone was congratulating me on a fantastic shot and I felt like a hero.  I had a

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/14/2007 at 18:11
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both are fine rifles, i work in a gun store (part time) and get to play with these things quite often. although in my opinion sako is a higher quality rifle, all internal parts are stainless the barrels are cold hammer forged 4groove rifling.

cold hammer forging produces a very uniform bore and actually hardens the bore surface it also reduces machining stress. sako also comes with a written guarantee to shoot 1 inch or less 5 shot groups at 100 yards. wertherby guarantees 1.5 three shot groups .three lugs are better as more of the lugs will be in contact with the reciever and therefor will be more true in the action also less dirt accumulation. there triggers are also much crisper and user adjustable.sako s free float the barrel weratheby does not .free floating helps with changes of point of impact due to heat and stock stresses due to weather changes. But what it really comes down to is what you want. if you want a lighter faster handling rifle in a standard or smaller magnum cartrage 300 wsm 300 win 7mm rm 270 wsm are anything smaller the sako will fit the bill. if you want a long range wander than get the weatherby but if you get the weatherby get it in a weatherby cal such as 30/378, 300 weatherby, 7mm weatherby ,338/378 . hell just go all out and get the 375 weatherby magnum. get what you feel fits you the best, if you like the gun you have and it fits you well and you are comfortable with it then, you will shoot that rifle the best

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/14/2007 at 20:38
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i own a 300wsm and i dont recommend a light weight rifle in that caliber, its a kicking sob!
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Originally posted by storm2844 storm2844 wrote:

cold hammer forging produces a very uniform bore and actually hardens the bore surface it also reduces machining stress. 

 

Storm,

Actually, Weatherby rifles have hammer forged barrels as well, except for the models with the Criterion barrels, which are button rifled.  Also, even though some very fine, good shooting barrels can be made from the hammer forging process, it actually imparts the most stress on barrel steel of all rifling methods.  Button rifling produces much less stress, and cut rifling the least amount of stress of all.  This all doesn't necessarily mean much depending on whether or not the barrel was stress relieved and or lapped afterward.

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one thing i have noticed about the whole buttoned vs hammered, browning abolts are buttoned and every browning i have owned has been exceptionaly accurate considering they were in the 300 mag class, my bro in law has a nasty ,270 in an abolt and its quite accurate as well, does the button have anything to do with this??
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I'm pretty sure Browning A-Bolts have hammer forged barrels as well.  A-Bolts are made by Miroku of Japan, who to the best of my knowledge use the hammer forging process.  Most of the majors except Savage and TC hammer forge their barrels, because it is more adaptable to high volume manufacturing. 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/14/2007 at 21:23
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i dont know what im think there cause i know i saw it somewhere i just cant find it anywhere, so i dont know who i am thinking of on that one cause browning web page doesnt say, and neither does savages at least that i could see.
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Nope pyro, you ain't loosing it. They are button rifled. I don't think Hart, Lilja or even Douglas for that matter are laying awake at night though.

 

http://www.browning.com/products/adsbroch/support/pdf/05_156 _bfa.pdf

 

 



Edited by Roy Finn
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/14/2007 at 22:17
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Good find, Roy!  I hadn't seen any mention of how their barrels were made, so I assumed they were like most of the high volume mfgs.
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I had no idea beforeI looked for it myself. I figured the same as you regarding hammer forged barrels.
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My Weatherby Mark V's:

 

     1) TRR 223rem - 5 shot groups attainable at 200 yards with a 20X scope - trigger is pretty good at slightly less than 3#'s with a small amount of creep - negligible recoil as the rifle weighs about 9.5#'s with scope - really fun too shoot

     2) Lightweight Sporter 30-06 with muzzle break (this one had the safety/trigger problem) - has very sharp recoil without break - worst trigger of the bunch at slightly more than 3#'s - wicked cool looks with the muzzle break and skinny #1 barrel

     3) SVM 7mm-08, singleshot - haven't scoped or shot this one yet - with it's weight, 8.5#'s sans scope, it should be a pussycat

 

     The SVM's trigger was replaced with a Timney Trigger because I really wanted a light trigger for this rifle.  I was unable to adjust the trigger pull weight below 3#'s and get it to pass the bolt slam and butt slam tests.  It also had a small but noticable amount of creep. 

 

     The Timney Trigger is advertised as being adjustable from 1.5 - 3.5#'s.  I had mine installed by an authorized Weatherby Service Center.  They were only able to get it down to 2.75#'s and pass both slam tests.  However, it doesn't have any creep.  It has a wider smooth surface but the edges are not radiused.

 

     I purchased it directly from Timney Triggers and had to wait 3 or 4 months for a production run.  It's about $130 (plus installation); you can see a picture of it on their website.  Had I known it wouldn't make it to 2#'s, my goal for this rifle, I would not have bought it.  As far as I know this trigger is the only aftermarket trigger made for Mark V's and fits both standard and magnum actions.

 

     I'd like to get a magnum Mark V just to experience the bigger action.  I've recently handled, but not shot, a 300 Weatherby and the action does feel slicker than the standard actions of my Weatherby Mark V's.  I guess it's because of the much larger bolt diameter. 

 

     It's weird but every time I pick up a Mark V magnum it feels a lot smaller in my hands than I would expect.  At 8.5#'s for a 257-340 they're heavier than a typical 700 but I actually like the extra heft.  I'm thinking the 257 at 8.5#'s would be fairly easy to shoot for a magnum, even for someone like me who likes a soft shooter.  I do wish there was more ammo choices for the 257 like what I've seen with the 270 and 7mm Weatherby. 

 

     I used to own a Tikka 270WSM Hunter (6#'s 13 oz.s without scope) that to me kicked pretty good with 150 grain rounds.  I've been told by others had I replaced the factory recoil pad with a Limbsaver it would have been tamed.  I sold it to a friend of mine, full disclosure of course.  He likes it factory stock but told me, seriously, it recoils more than his 700BDL 300win mag.  So that's another reason I'm thinking the 257 Weatherby Mark V should be okay for me. 

 

     Any recommendations? And FYI - I haven't shot a 300 since my school days and the funny thing is I don't remember it being a heavy kicker.  Of course I was pumped on adrenaline.

 

timber

 

 

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i put a limbsaver on my 300 wsm and it helped some but i would assume the 300 weatherby to be comparable to my 300 wsm my 300 win mag on the other hand is what you would call a pussy cat, and i dont know why because they are basicaly the same rifle except one is ss barrel the other is matte finished. the .257 is a very could candidate for a reloader, you can mix it up and really give yourself options like you say you want by doing so.
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Originally posted by Roy Finn Roy Finn wrote:

Nope pyro, you ain't loosing it. They are button rifled. I don't think Hart, Lilja or even Douglas for that matter are laying awake at night though.

 

http://www.browning.com/products/adsbroch/support/pdf/05_156 _bfa.pdf

 

 

 

thanks roy! i could swear it was true i just couldnt find it now i can sleep better knowing im not going

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browning a bolt barrels are button rifled. browning does a very good job on there barrels once they are rifled they check them for straightness and air gauged for uniformity. there tolerences may be lower than the high end manufactures like shilen and hart. but it is still a nice q.c step. browning b.a.r barrels are hammer forged in belgum.

pyro i to have a light rifle in 300 wsm its a sako 85 synthetic stainless, i find to that it kicks very hard ,it is more of a punch than a push like my 300 wm ,my wm is 2 pounds heaver though.

timber if you go online and google "big game info" that site has a good recoil calculator.

for a 7.5 pound tikka (scoped) 270 wsm recoil energy is around 25.9 flb

for a 9.5 pound 257 weatherby (scoped) recoil is only 16 flbs

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Originally posted by timber timber wrote:

My Weatherby Mark V's:

 

     1) TRR 223rem - 5 shot groups attainable at 200 yards with a 20X scope - trigger is pretty good at slightly less than 3#'s with a small amount of creep - negligible recoil as the rifle weighs about 9.5#'s with scope - really fun too shoot

     2) Lightweight Sporter 30-06 with muzzle break (this one had the safety/trigger problem) - has very sharp recoil without break - worst trigger of the bunch at slightly more than 3#'s - wicked cool looks with the muzzle break and skinny #1 barrel

     3) SVM 7mm-08, singleshot - haven't scoped or shot this one yet - with it's weight, 8.5#'s sans scope, it should be a pussycat

 

     The SVM's trigger was replaced with a Timney Trigger because I really wanted a light trigger for this rifle.  I was unable to adjust the trigger pull weight below 3#'s and get it to pass the bolt slam and butt slam tests.  It also had a small but noticable amount of creep. 

 

     The Timney Trigger is advertised as being adjustable from 1.5 - 3.5#'s.  I had mine installed by an authorized Weatherby Service Center.  They were only able to get it down to 2.75#'s and pass both slam tests.  However, it doesn't have any creep.  It has a wider smooth surface but the edges are not radiused.

 

     I purchased it directly from Timney Triggers and had to wait 3 or 4 months for a production run.  It's about $130 (plus installation); you can see a picture of it on their website.  Had I known it wouldn't make it to 2#'s, my goal for this rifle, I would not have bought it.  As far as I know this trigger is the only aftermarket trigger made for Mark V's and fits both standard and magnum actions.

 

     I'd like to get a magnum Mark V just to experience the bigger action.  I've recently handled, but not shot, a 300 Weatherby and the action does feel slicker than the standard actions of my Weatherby Mark V's.  I guess it's because of the much larger bolt diameter. 

 

     It's weird but every time I pick up a Mark V magnum it feels a lot smaller in my hands than I would expect.  At 8.5#'s for a 257-340 they're heavier than a typical 700 but I actually like the extra heft.  I'm thinking the 257 at 8.5#'s would be fairly easy to shoot for a magnum, even for someone like me who likes a soft shooter.  I do wish there was more ammo choices for the 257 like what I've seen with the 270 and 7mm Weatherby. 

 

     I used to own a Tikka 270WSM Hunter (6#'s 13 oz.s without scope) that to me kicked pretty good with 150 grain rounds.  I've been told by others had I replaced the factory recoil pad with a Limbsaver it would have been tamed.  I sold it to a friend of mine, full disclosure of course.  He likes it factory stock but told me, seriously, it recoils more than his 700BDL 300win mag.  So that's another reason I'm thinking the 257 Weatherby Mark V should be okay for me. 

 

     Any recommendations? And FYI - I haven't shot a 300 since my school days and the funny thing is I don't remember it being a heavy kicker.  Of course I was pumped on adrenaline.

 

timber

 

 

Timber, as the owner of multiple Mark Vs, the most recent purchase of which was a synthetic 270 Wby. with a SS action and barrel, used, minimally, looks brand new, as almost all of my Wby. purchases have been, I think I can lend some help.  The 300 that I own has a nice gloss wooden stock with a #1 contour barrel and does kick, but to me it is not bother me, or create any flinching.  Now, that might because I weigh about 235 and seem to be gaining all the time.  Believe it or not, my 7mmSTW with a 9 lug action, re-barreled from a 7Wby. in a matted Euromark stock, kicks much harder than the 300 and believe weighs more.  This is with similar weight bullets and factory (Wby.) ammo.  Personally, I would get the 300, just because you will have more versatility with respect to the game you will be able to take and take safely.  The 257 can easily down a black bear, but you are on the edge, easily on the edge and if shot placement is not just right, good luck finding the animal or even worse, if you do not get another shot off, getting away.  Just a few of my thoughts.  On the other hand, you have a 30-06, which can do about everything the 300 can do, so if you look at it that way, get the 257, which was Roy's favorite caliber.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/15/2007 at 18:41
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the .257wby would be my caliber of choice if i had the money to go buy a new rifle today,the only issue i have with the  caliber is i enjoy shooting and so one has to really be careful not to shoot the .257 while hot, but if you pay attention to the temp of the barrel its not an issue
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/15/2007 at 20:16
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if my 300wsm wasnt so accurate i think i would get rid of it cause the recoil is somewhat obnoxious from the bench
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/15/2007 at 23:03
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storm 2844 wrote:

 

timber if you go online and google "big game info" that site has a good recoil calculator.

 

Good info.  I don't handload.  How do I know what 'powder charge' to use for any given calculation?

 

pyro6999 wrote:

 

the .257wby would be my caliber of choice if i had the money to go buy a new rifle today,the only issue i have with the  caliber is i enjoy shooting and so one has to really be careful not to shoot the .257 while hot, but if you pay attention to the temp of the barrel its not an issue

 

I don't understand technically what damage can occur if a barrel is shot hot.  I've been told erosion of the throat.  Does this mean that the metal is literally burned away to the point where a cartridge won't seat properly and therefore affects accuracy?  Is this what is meant when the barrel is 'shot out'?  Can someone explain this?  Also, I've noticed faster copper build-up if a rifle is shot when hot.  Is this another by-product of shooting with a hot barrel? 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/16/2007 at 08:25
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Originally posted by timber timber wrote:

storm 2844 wrote:

 

timber if you go online and google "big game info" that site has a good recoil calculator.

 

Good info.  I don't handload.  How do I know what 'powder charge' to use for any given calculation?

 

pyro6999 wrote:

 

the .257wby would be my caliber of choice if i had the money to go buy a new rifle today,the only issue i have with the  caliber is i enjoy shooting and so one has to really be careful not to shoot the .257 while hot, but if you pay attention to the temp of the barrel its not an issue

 

I don't understand technically what damage can occur if a barrel is shot hot.  I've been told erosion of the throat.  Does this mean that the metal is literally burned away to the point where a cartridge won't seat properly and therefore affects accuracy?  Is this what is meant when the barrel is 'shot out'?  Can someone explain this?  Also, I've noticed faster copper build-up if a rifle is shot when hot.  Is this another by-product of shooting with a hot barrel? 

Without repeating a discussion of throat erosion, here is a link to one of my last opinions regarding the subject:

  http://www.opticstalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=7586&KW=th roat+erosion

Read my first post on that page.



Edited by Dolphin
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: October/16/2007 at 16:30
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Okay, so throat erosion is not something to be concerned about for most hunting rifles because, in most cases, they're not shot enough.  But just for arguments' sake is shooting a barrel while hot even something to be concerned about for the typical hunting rifle? 

 

Say you're at the range and you're trying to get in a lot of practice (with a hunting rifle) in a short amount of time.  So you fire away and the barrel starts getting hot, usually after only 6 or 7 rounds in something like a 30-06.  If you keep shooting are you damaging the barrel?  Or is the point that you are probably damaging the barrel some but it doesn't matter much because you may only shoot a box or two at a time and then only once or twice a year?  The point being that even doing this you'll never even get close to a 1000 rounds in a lifetime.

 

I will say that I am aware of course that accuracy drops off with a hot barrel.  And it seems to me that copper build-up occurs faster with a hot barrel.  And further this is not something I make a practice of but I have experimented with this in the past.  What I've found beyond the accuracy and copper issues stated above is that the next time I fired the rifle cold it appeared to be perfectly fine.  Once the copper was removed accuracy seemed to be back to normal.

 

If anyone has information on where to find typical powder charges for various calibers I'd most appreciate it.  I'd like to play around with some recoil calculations and need these figures.

 

timber

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