New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Reloading equipment & other related cost
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Check GunBroker.com for SWFA's No Reserve and No Minimum bid firearm auctions.

Reloading equipment & other related cost

 Post Reply Post Reply   Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 11:39
EAGLE View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: August/08/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 332
I find myself shooting more often and buying store bought ammo is getting expensive ( premium), especially when you have to try many just to find the one that works best in my rig.

Seems to me that I could be that much more ahead by just reloading.

Anyway, I plan on buying some reloading books such as Lyman & Hornady and reloading equipment.

I want to reload for the following: Pistols 9 & 40 ACP and Rifles .308, .243 and .223 for now.

So what equipment do I need to get started?

Any guidance or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Eagle
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 11:53
pyro6999 View Drop Down
Optics Retard
Optics Retard
Avatar
OT TITAN

Joined: December/22/2006
Location: North Dakota
Status: Offline
Points: 22024
if you shoot a lot, a dillon may be the way to go....
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 12:12
BeltFed View Drop Down
Optics God
Optics God
Avatar

Joined: February/12/2008
Location: Ky
Status: Online
Points: 16085
If you don't already reload, forget the Dillon, and get a basic kit from RCBS, Lyman, Hornady, etc..
Once you've learned the basics of reloading, you can decide how you want to go; more accuracy or more volume. Either way, you will still have a need for your basic press and equipment.
Safety is of the utmost importance in reloading, and it is easier to concentrate and understand one operation at a time on a single stage press, than it is to try and learn 4 or 5 operations at the same time on a progressive press.
I would recommend the RCBS Rockchucker kit to start out with. 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 12:32
SVT_Tactical View Drop Down
Optics Retard
Optics Retard
Avatar
Chief Sackscratch

Joined: December/17/2009
Location: NorthCackalacky
Status: Offline
Points: 28758
Lee makes a good deluxe kit that is inexpensive and will let you learn on. 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 12:50
tahqua View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar
Have You Driven A Ford Lately?

Joined: March/27/2006
Location: Michigan, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 8047
+1 on the Rockchucker kit. The press itself is as solid as any.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 13:09
Stevey Ducks View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: December/03/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 266
+2 on the Rockchucker kit (Rockchucker Supreme Master Kit)
This contains most essentials to begin reloading. It costs about $320.
It comes with a Speer manual but other manuals such as Sierra and Hornady should be considered also
The press if used correctly and given moderate care will last forever - mine is 36 years old.
Safety and ammo reliability is a primary consideration and the manuals have info on this.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 13:32
EAGLE View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: August/08/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 332
Is a tumbler a must ? Common sense tells me to keep powders seperate from primers ( keep heavy objects from above), but should special storage be considered ?

Sorry guys if the questions seem dumb but I want to be safe and as knowledgeable as possible.

Eagle
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 13:45
stickbow46 View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: January/07/2009
Location: Benton, Pa
Status: Offline
Points: 4673
Yes but good measuring  tools should come first,like a micrometer a good scale & wax to help resize the rifle bullets also don't cut corners on the dye sets.
 
& the list goes on & on & on..........
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 13:54
EAGLE View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: August/08/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 332
Names to consider on die sets or material used?

Eagle
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 14:00
SVT_Tactical View Drop Down
Optics Retard
Optics Retard
Avatar
Chief Sackscratch

Joined: December/17/2009
Location: NorthCackalacky
Status: Offline
Points: 28758
RCBS, Redding, hornady, most all are good.  I've standarized my collection on mainly redding, they have great CS and never had any issues. RCBS has excellent CS too, had to use them recently and they were very quick with replacement parts.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 14:04
Stevey Ducks View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: December/03/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 266
Everything must be stored in its original container.
 
Powder should be stored in an enclosed wooden box having sides of 1 inch thick. There are publications out there that have more info on powder storage. I don't like to store lots greater than 8 lbs in a single location.
 
Primers should be stored separate from powders. Don't know this for a fact, but I would not store primers near powerful radio transmitters. Take note that primers come in boxes having individual compartments for each single primer. Also take note that priming tools have barrier to separate the primer being seated into the brass case from the rest of the primers in the tray - this is to prevent a chain reaction should the primer being seated go off (explode).
 
Both should be stored in a cool dry place.
 
Both powders and primers should be treated with respect. When loading keep only one container of powder on the bench. Wear eye protection.
 
Clean shiny brass is nice but not essential but trimming it to length specifications is. Some folks clean brass by spinning their brass using a Lee shell holder and use steel wool. I guess I am fussy but I wear nitrile gloves while loading ammo.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 14:10
pyro6999 View Drop Down
Optics Retard
Optics Retard
Avatar
OT TITAN

Joined: December/22/2006
Location: North Dakota
Status: Offline
Points: 22024
i find a tumbler to be nice, sometimes after you tumble brass you find  signs of weakness or even failure in your cases.


ive always ran rcbs equipment.... i have a rock chucker press and its great. the cs dept at rcbs is top shelf. i will say on a side note that i dont think any of the major companies today make a bad press, and redding imo makes some of the best dies out there today....

if you have or have access to an old junk freezer or refrigerator, they make a great powder storage locker, especially a deep freeze with a lock on it.....
imo, a digital scale is an absolute must. it makes for more accurate loads and is faster than a balance beam style.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 14:34
Stevey Ducks View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: December/03/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 266
The info source for powder storage is the SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute) publication that can be had on line.
 
In that publication, in chapter 11, or section 11 3.7 it gets into the quantities and storage of powders.
 
Specifically, the residential amount is 20 lbs and the storage container is to be wood 1 inch thick sided.
 
Smokeless powder can deteriorate with age giving off gasses and strong air tight containers should not be used. In the event of ignition with or without deterioration, confinement of these gasses in a strong airtight container would result in an explosion.
 
No ammo loading police (yet?) but you gotta be protected in the event of an insurance claim.
 
Load ammo safely, many have been doing so for decades without mishaps. 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 14:47
pyro6999 View Drop Down
Optics Retard
Optics Retard
Avatar
OT TITAN

Joined: December/22/2006
Location: North Dakota
Status: Offline
Points: 22024
Originally posted by Stevey Ducks Stevey Ducks wrote:

The info source for powder storage is the SAAMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute) publication that can be had on line.
 
In that publication, in chapter 11, or section 11 3.7 it gets into the quantities and storage of powders.
 
Specifically, the residential amount is 20 lbs and the storage container is to be wood 1 inch thick sided.
 
Smokeless powder can deteriorate with age giving off gasses and strong air tight containers should not be used. In the event of ignition with or without deterioration, confinement of these gasses in a strong airtight container would result in an explosion.
 
No ammo loading police (yet?) but you gotta be protected in the event of an insurance claim.
 
Load ammo safely, many have been doing so for decades without mishaps. 

nfpa standard 495 is what most local municipalities reference. 50 pounds is the max.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 15:01
EAGLE View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: August/08/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 332
If I remember correctly, I believe there is limit on how many primers can be stored (residentially) and difer by state but for some reasons 10,000 comes to mind.

Can primer dust be a problem ?

Some good info and I appreciate it too.

Eagle
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 15:03
pyro6999 View Drop Down
Optics Retard
Optics Retard
Avatar
OT TITAN

Joined: December/22/2006
Location: North Dakota
Status: Offline
Points: 22024
10K is correct, im not sure what you mean by "primer dust" though??
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 18:51
MC Escher View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: September/25/2012
Location: Ohio
Status: Offline
Points: 121
Step 1: Buy a reloading manual, ANY reloading manual, and read through it. You'll find a lot more stuff than just loading tables. You'll also find advice about what equipment to buy.

Step 2: Buy a Forster Co-Ax and begin by reloading for your rifle rounds. Those are more involved than pistol rounds and you'll learn more. Plus, you'll tinker more with rifle rounds and a single stage manual like the Forster is better suiting to the slow, careful reloading that you tend to do with rifle cartridges.

Step 3:
One you know whether or not you think reloading is for you, if you want to start reloading in larger quantities for your pistol rounds, which you'll go through more of if you're like most people, then you can move up to a good progressive. As with scopes, it's cheaper to buy the good stuff first, meaning a Dillon 550 or 650, but before you do, trying it out on a less expensive press first is wise.



That's my opinion.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 18:59
Stevey Ducks View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: December/03/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 266
The SAAMI publication regarding primers probably is derived from NFPA codes and can be obtained on line.
 
The number is 10,000 stored in residences. Good for 2.8 years for my shooting.
 
Specifications for storage are wood containers (lumber) with walls 1 inch thick.
 
Primer dust or "dusting" is mentioned and the precautions for this are to clean any primer seating equipment after use such as primer tubes and trays to remove any dust (explosive). As mentioned before primers come in trays that hold each single primer in its own pocket.
 
Static electricity, shock, impact, and heat are mentioned as possible causes for explosion.
 
In addtion to my nitrile gloves and eye protection I maintain the relative humidity in my loading area at 35%, wipe down any powder or primer handling equipment with common laundry dryer sheets and have a wrist band ground to the nearest copper water pipe (without pex). I guess this is a carryover from my former life handling chemicals, toxic agents, and computers. These safety precautions are outlined on the Western Powder web site.
 
An interesting story that may or may not be true is that during WWII at one of our arsenals that produced millions of US .30 ammo rounds (probably .30-06, M2) is that one workers who was charged with cleaning up the primer production was carrying a bucket of cull primers when it went off. This destroyed his body and scattered body parts. Viewing the building where the ammo production took place is like being in a maze consisting of unconnected cubicles.
 
You, Eagle, as a fledgling handloader, are to be complimented on your common sense safety concerns and questions.
 
 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 21:35
EAGLE View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: August/08/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 332
Picked up a Lyman"49th Edition" and reading it.

It's a good read and even if someone wasn't interested in reloading, it's worth reading.

Eagle
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/31/2012 at 22:28
M1Thumb View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: December/27/2012
Location: Washington
Status: Offline
Points: 139
Originally posted by BeltFed BeltFed wrote:

If you don't already reload, forget the Dillon, and get a basic kit from RCBS, Lyman, Hornady, etc..
Once you've learned the basics of reloading, you can decide how you want to go; more accuracy or more volume. Either way, you will still have a need for your basic press and equipment.
Safety is of the utmost importance in reloading, and it is easier to concentrate and understand one operation at a time on a single stage press, than it is to try and learn 4 or 5 operations at the same time on a progressive press.
I would recommend the RCBS Rockchucker kit to start out with. 
 
Exactly SAFETY I for go the multi stage press and use a single stage till you are 100% comfortable with reloading - 1 process at a time reduces the chances of errors and not catching something that could be a safety issue.
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Similar Threads: "Reloading equipment & other related cost"
Subject Author Forum Replies Last Post
Buying Reloading Equipment, Maybe? JF4545 Reloading & Ballistics 32
reloading equipment Brad4213 Reloading & Ballistics 11
280 Rem & 25-06 -- 1st Reloads M7025-06 The Range Report 37
Scope cost vs. Gun cost tjones96761 Rifle Scopes 43
Reloading 40 S&W Bill Mayhugh Reloading & Ballistics 11
Gun cleaning equipment shooter4 Firearms 13
s&w m&p sights rustic Firearms 34
M&P15-22 & Weaver V3 sholling Rimfire / Airgun 4
so who has scopes costing more than your gun outlawskinnyd Rifle Scopes 29
Rainy Day Reloading... cheaptrick Reloading & Ballistics 8


This page was generated in 0.344 seconds.