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***THE OFFICIAL OT WHISK(E)Y DRINKERS THREAD***

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Printed Date: November/13/2018 at 12:48


Topic: ***THE OFFICIAL OT WHISK(E)Y DRINKERS THREAD***
Posted By: RifleDude
Subject: ***THE OFFICIAL OT WHISK(E)Y DRINKERS THREAD***
Date Posted: January/28/2018 at 14:47
I know many of you here enjoy a dram of fine distilled spirits on occasion, so this thread will be THE place to discuss all things pertaining to good whiskies and maybe the not-so-good whiskies.

First of all before we continue, a little clarification in order...
"Whiskey" and "whisky" are both proper spellings of the word, but they are used for whiskies made in different parts of the world.

"Whiskey" is made in the US and Ireland.
"Whisky" is made pretty much everywhere else.

My alcoholic drink of choice was beer until relatively recently. I still love a good cold beer, especially when unwinding on a hot day. However, beer was dethroned as my favorite adult beverage when one of my hunting buddies brought some Glenlivet 12 year old to hunting camp about 6 - 7 years ago. I liked it so much, I then embarked on a mission to try as many different Scotch Whiskies as I could. I always liked Bourbon as well, and enjoy a good Bourbon on occasion, but I still prefer a fine single malt Scotch whisky. My tastes have evolved a lot over the past 5-6 years such that I no longer rate Glenlivet 12 very highly, or even think it's all that good anymore compared to other options.

I've tried something like 40 different single malt Scotches and a few blends. Again, my tastes have evolved considerably. In general, I prefer the single malts matured in ex-sherry casks vs those matured in ex-bourbon casks. I initially didn't care for peated Scotch, but now like both peated and non-peated whiskies as long as the whisky in question has a nice balance of flavors with a great nose and a lingering, satisfying finish. As much as I hate to admit, I think I've become a Scotch snob.

In general, my favorite distilleries overall would have to be Macallan, Glenmorangie, and Highland Park. I've really liked everything I've tried from each of them.

My favorite single malt Scotch tried so far (I think) has been Macallan 18 (sherry cask version). However, given that prices on the stuff has climbed to $200 - $260 a bottle, I won't be buying it anytime soon. As such, I may be overrating it based on my memory of the occasions I've had some at restaurants. It's possible it may not remain my favorite if it were priced so I could taste it more often; I don't know.

So far, here are my top favorites, ranked roughly in order of preference:

1. Macallan 18 Sherry Cask
2. Glenmorangie Signet, Highland Park 18, and Old Pulteney 21 (3-way tie)
3. Talisker 18
4. Glencadam 15
5. Glenmorangie Nectar D'Or 12
6. Aberlour A'bunadh (Batch 60 is the only variation I've tried)
7. Glenmorangie Bacalta, Highland Park 12, Macallan 15 Fine Oak, Aberlour 18
8. Talisker 10
9. Ardbeg Uigeadail
10. Laphroaig Quarter Cask
11. Glenmorangie 18, Glenmorangie Astar, Lagavulin 16
12. Oban Distillers Edition, Oban 14, Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban 12

Beyond those, I also really like Dalwhinnie 15, Glen Moray 18, Aberlour 12, Springbank 15, Macallan 12, Highland Park Valkyrie, Dalmore 12, Glenmorangie Lasanta 12, Macallan Edition 2, Glenmorangie Original 10, and a few others. All of those are pretty equal to my taste, only different. Once I get past level 5 or 6 in the list above, they are all pretty close. My biggest surprise is how much my taste for peated Scotch has changed. When I originally tried Talisker and Lagavulin, I didn't care for them too much and now, I really enjoy both as well as some others that use peat fires to dry their malted barley. I don't know if it's just due to evolving taste or maybe I've gained a better ability to discern complex flavors, but it's been an interesting journey.

Others I liked but thought were just "ok:" Scapa Skiren, Bunnahabhain 12, Glenfiddich 15 Solera Reserve, Balvenie DoubleWood 12. Balvenie DoubleWood 12 is one I used to really like, but over time, it lost its luster for me. I don't think it's a bad whisky; I just think it's a bit too mild-mannered and lacks complexity.

I still don't "dislike" Glenlivet 12, the one that introduced me to Scotch in the first place. I just don't like it as well as the rest mentioned above. I think their new "Founder's Reserve" NAS that supposedly will be replacing their 12 YO is a total waste of money. It just had an "artificial sweetener" taste in the mix for me. I gave it away after the first "wee dram."

As far as value for the money, I think Glencadam 15, Talisker 10, the various Glenmo special "extra matured" 12 year olds, Glenmo Original, and Highland Park 12 get the nod for best "bang for the buck."

So, lets hear it folks -- what are your favorites and why?



Edit: Added new ones as I try them.


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.



Replies:
Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/28/2018 at 14:55
As I mentioned, I also like good Bourbons as well, just not quite as much as Scotch whisky.

My favorite bourbons so far are, in order:

1. Eagle Rare 10
2. Buffalo Trace
3. Basil Hayden's
4. Breckinridge
5. Bookers
6. Bulleit
7. Four Roses Small Batch
8. Templeton Rye
9. Maker's Mark


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: Peddler
Date Posted: January/28/2018 at 15:19
Don’t do much of the “brown” stuff any more with the exception of Jameson but the liquor cabinet still has the following in various amounts:

Scotch: Lagavulin 16, Speyburn 10 [no idea where that came from] and a Talisker 18.

Bourbon: Basil Hayden’s, Bookers and Blanton’s.

I just received a bottle of Jameson Black Barrel from our friend Scrummy of which I did a “ wee dram “ on Friday & Saturday night. It was my first Black Barrel and was thoroughly enjoyed and now resides in an old Irish Decanter. I’ll send pics of the Decanter.

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When you are dead, you don't know you are dead.It is difficult only for others.

It is the same when you are stupid.


Posted By: Urimaginaryfrnd
Date Posted: January/28/2018 at 17:41
Actually I don't drink much.  1554 New Belgium beer a couple times a month.  Jim Beam sometimes. Famous Grouse sometimes. Templeton Rye sometimes every few months or not.


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"Always do the right thing, just because it is the right thing to do".
Bobby Paul Doherty
Texas Ranger


Posted By: urbaneruralite
Date Posted: January/28/2018 at 20:39
I'll take Woodford Reserve in an Old Fashioned or Clyde Mays neat. If there's any heavy drinking to be done, I'll bring along a handle of Canadian Hunter. Those are not necessarily "good." They're just good enough and agree with me. 




Posted By: BeltFed
Date Posted: January/28/2018 at 20:42
I discovered a new bourbon Christmas day at my SIL's. It's called Blade and Bow. Very smooth, and my new favorite.

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Life's concerns should be about the 120lb pack your trying to get to the top of the mountain, and not the rock in your boot.


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 02:59
For choice I'm a Glenlivet man

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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 05:32
Down here in the Bowery I drink Cruzan rum mostly......I also like St Remy brandy......and sometimes a cheap Vodka from St Louis ( or somewhere ) with some orange juice....


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" Eduardo don't got no fancy decanters...."  












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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 05:33
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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: bugsNbows
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 11:05
As much as I like a good Bourbon, my stomach ulcers do not. Whatever

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If we're not suppose to eat animals...how come they're made of meat?
               Anomymous


Posted By: mike650
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 11:27
For the Irish out there, two very fine ones...






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Fish to Live, Live to Hunt


Posted By: Peddler
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 15:34
A friend just recommended Red Breast said he liked it better than Jameson.

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When you are dead, you don't know you are dead.It is difficult only for others.

It is the same when you are stupid.


Posted By: Rancid Coolaid
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 16:15
Still hooked on Michter's and Hudson Baby Bourbon.

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Freedom is something you take.
Respect is something you earn.
Equality is something you whine about not being given.


Posted By: mike650
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 16:27
Originally posted by Peddler Peddler wrote:

A friend just recommended Red Breast said he liked it better than Jameson.


Mucho better!  Wink


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Fish to Live, Live to Hunt


Posted By: Peddler
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 17:14
Originally posted by mike650 mike650 wrote:

Originally posted by Peddler Peddler wrote:

A friend just recommended Red Breast said he liked it better than Jameson.


Mucho better!  Wink



The Black Barrel Jameson that Scrummy sent me is definitely a step up from regular Jameson so after that is finished I’ll look for a “ Red Breast “ 😂

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When you are dead, you don't know you are dead.It is difficult only for others.

It is the same when you are stupid.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 17:28
Originally posted by Rancid Coolaid Rancid Coolaid wrote:

Still hooked on Michter's and Hudson Baby Bourbon.

Which version of Michter's?


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 17:29
Originally posted by mike650 mike650 wrote:

For the Irish out there, two very fine ones...

I'll give those a try. Thanks for the suggestions!


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 17:31
Originally posted by Peddler Peddler wrote:

...and now resides in an old Irish Decanter. I’ll send pics of the Decanter.

Post pics of the decanter in this thread!


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 17:36
Originally posted by urbaneruralite urbaneruralite wrote:

I'll take Woodford Reserve in an Old Fashioned 


I have some Woodford Reserve at home. I haven't tried it in an Old Fashioned, but so far drinking it neat and on the rocks, it just doesn't agree with my taste.


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 17:39
Ed, don't be bringing rum into a perfectly good discussion about whiskies!

-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: Peddler
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 17:56
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Originally posted by Peddler Peddler wrote:

...and now resides in an old Irish Decanter. I’ll send pics of the Decanter.


Post pics of the decanter in this thread!


Sorry Ted I’m not that good with the puter. Maybe one of you that I emailed the pic to can post it for me. I apologize for being old and having been dragged into the puter age.

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When you are dead, you don't know you are dead.It is difficult only for others.

It is the same when you are stupid.


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 18:20
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Ed, don't be bringing rum into a perfectly good discussion about whiskies!


Related image








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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 19:07
Originally posted by Peddler Peddler wrote:

 
Sorry Ted I’m not that good with the puter. Maybe one of you that I emailed the pic to can post it for me. I apologize for being old and having been dragged into the puter age.

It's time you learned.


See the little icon with the tree on it right above your post editor blank? Just put your cursor on the spot where you want the photo to be in your post, click on that tree icon, then click on "choose file" on the lower LH side of the next screen. Then navigate to the folder where the photo is on your 'puter, then click ok, and it posts in your thread.

If we can teach Ed how to post photos, we can teach anyone!



-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: January/29/2018 at 20:53
Image result

" The CURSOR is the little arrow thingee...." 






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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Kickboxer
Date Posted: January/30/2018 at 04:21

For Christmas, my Lady gave me a bottle of Ardbeg Corryvreckan.  It has been years since I tasted an Ardbeg.  If you are a fan of Laphroaig and Lagavulin, you will probably like it.  As a registered "Defender of The Malt", I can say that it is excellent.  The flavors are complex, a lot of smoky peat, chocolate, black currant, some spice, maybe a hint of vanilla in the finish.  It is not "light".  Not for the uninitiated.  You can see the fires burning at the first touch to the tongue. 

The first sip of scotch I ever had, in high school, I liked it... Grant's Scotch.  I still remember the "rush" of flavors and my first thought that "everybody said this stuff didn't taste good".  My taste was not "acquired", I've simply just always liked the stuff.



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Opinion,untempered by fact,is ignorance.

There are some who do not fear death... for they are more afraid of not really living


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: January/30/2018 at 04:26
Peddler's decanter...




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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: Peddler
Date Posted: January/30/2018 at 04:36
Thanks Scrummy.

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When you are dead, you don't know you are dead.It is difficult only for others.

It is the same when you are stupid.


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: January/30/2018 at 06:01
Originally posted by Peddler Peddler wrote:

Thanks Scrummy.

Welcome sir!


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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/30/2018 at 06:04
Nice decanter, Skip!

Now, your assignment for today is to post a photo. Give it a try; it’s not difficult.

-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/30/2018 at 06:15
Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:


As a registered "Defender of The Malt", I can say that it is excellent. 



Ok, I’ll bite. I’ve heard you mention this multiple times but don’t know what this means. Secret society? Do you pay dues? Is there a secret handshake? Have to pass a rigorous exam? How does one become registered? Are there good retirement benefits?

-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: urbaneruralite
Date Posted: January/30/2018 at 17:49
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Originally posted by urbaneruralite urbaneruralite wrote:

I'll take Woodford Reserve in an Old Fashioned 


I have some Woodford Reserve at home. I haven't tried it in an Old Fashioned, but so far drinking it neat and on the rocks, it just doesn't agree with my taste.



http://youtu.be/i415QwSj0Og - https://youtu.be/i415QwSj0Og


Posted By: anweis
Date Posted: January/30/2018 at 19:05
My favorite is some sort of whiskey, neat, chased by a strong copper/brown/double ale (Irish, Belgian style).
I have tasted enough ales and beers to know which ones  i like and which ones i don't, but i am learning about the whiskeys.
One thing is for sure: i don't like peaty  Scotch. I like some blended Scotch.
I absolutely loved Jefferson bourbon recently, as well as Woodford reserve double oaked.

Rifle dude, i believe i like a good bourbon more than scotch, but i would appreciate if you went over you list and made it again with a slight comment or grading in regard to the strength of  peaty flavor.  That wold save many novices a lot of grief and money.

Of course, being originally from Europe, i know a thing or two about our slibovitz, palinka, and the like.
I even have my own still and make a gallon or two of apple, pear, or peach palinka (84 proof, no additives, colors, flavors, or sugar added) sometimes. I can't find enough cheap plums anywhere, and failed to grow them myself (too many diseases and insects for the trees, plus common late frosts after they bloom). I did a batch of corn whiskey, too, but i did not like it. Even ordered a mulberry cask, to keep the good stuff and impart a nice mellow aged flavor and yellowish color.

I suppose that if i went into a bar that had all the drinks and i could order anything, it would be a
a) Calvados (French/Spanish apple schnaps) double shot and a mug of home made northern Spain apple cider
or b) a double shot of Hungarian quince palinka and a  mug of their coldest cheapest rough beer.
Both combinations remind me of friends and  dogs from times past, muddy boots, and roe and boar hunts.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/30/2018 at 20:56
Originally posted by anweis anweis wrote:



Rifle dude, i believe i like a good bourbon more than scotch, but i would appreciate if you went over you list and made it again with a slight comment or grading in regard to the strength of  peaty flavor.  That wold save many novices a lot of grief and money.


Sure thing, buddy. The only Scotches I mentioned in my OP that have any peaty flavor present at all are, (ranked from least to most peat):

- Highland Park 18 - just a hint of peat
- Highland Park 12 
- Oban Distiller's Edition, Oban 14
- Springbank 15
- Highland Park Valkyrie
- Talisker 18
- Talisker 10
- Lagavulin 16 - pretty heavy peat
- Lagavulin 12 (forgot to list in my OP) - cask strength, and heavier peat than the 16

When it comes to the peated whiskies, as a general rule, longer barrel maturation tends to subdue the peaty/smoky flavor, so the older versions of any given peaty whisky are typically more mellow and have less phenolic, "medicinal" taste. 

If you don't like peated Scotch, you should avoid all of the ones made on the island of Islay except for most versions of Bunnahabhain, which is the only Islay distillery that offers unpeated single malts. The remaining Islay distilleries include Lagavulin, Laphroaig, Ardbeg, Bruichladdich, Caol Ila, Kilchoman, Bowmore, Port Ellen, and Port Charlotte, all of which are heavily peated.

Elsewhere, Talisker, the only distillery on the island of Skye, is a little less peaty than the Islay whiskies, but still has pronounced peatiness.

Highland Park, made on Orkney Island north of the Scottish mainland, has a light peat flavor. The peat that is present is less pungent and more sweet than peated whiskies from other regions due to the fact the area where HP gets their peat on the island has a lack of woody plant matter and a high concentration of heather. If you want to ease into peatier whiskies to see if you might develop a taste for some peatiness, Highland Park's stuff is a good starting point. They have a little different flavor profile of other peated Scotches. Their stuff tends to be sweeter and have honeyed fruit notes to balance the smokiness.

The above isn't intended to be all-inclusive; there are many more examples of peated Scotches. All of the rest of the Scotches in my list in the OP have no detectable peat flavor. Actually the list of unpeated Scotches far outnumbers those that are peated.

Edit: left out a couple of the Islay distilleries



-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: anweis
Date Posted: January/30/2018 at 21:09
Thanks!!! That helps a lot. Will make and save your list and suggestions for my next visit to our only decent store and will see what they have. Will take it easy and will see what we learn.


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: January/31/2018 at 06:17
Originally posted by anweis anweis wrote:

Thanks!!! That helps a lot. Will make and save your list and suggestions for my next visit to our only decent store and will see what they have. Will take it easy and will see what we learn.

Anweis,

Generally the least peaty whisky is type is Speyside so good brands to start with (in my view) are Glenlivet, Glenfiddich, Glenmorganie

A 1/2 pint as an accompaniment is very nice. A good session bitter for choice.

Scrummy


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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: Kickboxer
Date Posted: January/31/2018 at 07:15
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:


As a registered "Defender of The Malt", I can say that it is excellent. 



Ok, I’ll bite. I’ve heard you mention this multiple times but don’t know what this means. Secret society? Do you pay dues? Is there a secret handshake? Have to pass a rigorous exam? How does one become registered? Are there good retirement benefits?

1) not secret, I became a member in the 80's.  Received a "formal invitation" from a member I met in London

2) did when it was active, but once a member always a Defender of the Malt... by charter

3) NO, merely a dedication to preservation of enjoyment and preservation of the "aqua vitae"... bourbons were considered "crass" and it is only in very recent times that I have given bourbons any consideration

4) Actually, it was expected that one would gain knowledge of and pass on the knowledge of whisky, try to expand the "circle".  When I traveled overseas more, met others who were "Defenders", shared time, a dram or two, and often a good cigar...  was introduced to some very fine whiskies and learned finer points of appreciation through association

5) Sadly, the organization no longer exists, the spirit will always exist

6) Only those benefits that one brings to oneself



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Opinion,untempered by fact,is ignorance.

There are some who do not fear death... for they are more afraid of not really living


Posted By: mike650
Date Posted: January/31/2018 at 10:05



-------------
Fish to Live, Live to Hunt


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/31/2018 at 10:42


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: January/31/2018 at 13:21
Related image













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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: January/31/2018 at 13:23
Image result for bob hope paleface saloon

" Gimme a Highland Park 18!   Pronto! Grrrrrr!!!! " 










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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: January/31/2018 at 16:04
Just picked up a bottle each of Laphroaig Quarter Cask and Ardbeg Uigeadail. Never tried whiskies from either distillery before. I'm going all-in on the peat monster experience tonight!

-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: Peddler
Date Posted: January/31/2018 at 16:52
A “ wee dram “ as my friend Scrummy says!

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When you are dead, you don't know you are dead.It is difficult only for others.

It is the same when you are stupid.


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: February/01/2018 at 03:09
Aye, a wee dram is welcome on a cold night!

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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/01/2018 at 14:29
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Just picked up a bottle each of Laphroaig Quarter Cask and Ardbeg Uigeadail. Never tried whiskies from either distillery before. I'm going all-in on the peat monster experience tonight!

Ok, as follow-up to this, I had a couple "wee drams" of each last night.

HOLY SMOKE SHOW, BATMAN!

Both of these malts are anything BUT delicate and timid! If one is new to single malt Scotch, I think it's a pretty safe bet these are probably not the first whiskies you'd want to try as your introduction. They're about as gentle as a freight train! The same can probably be said for most, if not all Islay region malts, though.

That being said, I LOVED both of them! I was surprised by how much I enjoyed them, in fact. My relationship with peated Scotch has been a very gradual development.

Until fairly recently in my Scotch adventure, the peat flavor and I just didn't get along, so I can understand why many people avoid and/or outright hate the heavily peated Scotches. It seems to be a polarizing flavor -- you either love it or hate it. My first introduction to peated Scotch was Lagavulin 12 5-6 years ago. I didn't pour it down the drain; I ended up drinking the whole bottle, but I didn't care for it too much, and until just a few months ago never bought another bottle after that first one. This is why until this week, I avoided trying brands like Ardbeg and Laphroaig. They had a reputation for being even more peaty and assertive than Lagavulin, so if Lagavulin and I didn't get along, why would I spend money for the other peat monster Islay malts?

Then, about 2 years ago, I began trying lightly peated malts like Oban, Springbank, and Highland Park and found I liked them. A lot. They had some other sweet, spicy, and citrusy notes to balance the bitterness of the peat. I still avoided Lagavulin for awhile, but given all the praise the Islay malts received, I figured I must be missing something and decided to give them another try now that I'd learned to appreciate a greater range of flavor profiles in Scotches from all regions besides Islay. Famous author Robert Louis Stevenson once famously declared Talisker "the king of all drinks," so I thought there must be some magic there I'm missing out on. So, I took the plunge into a bit more peat and tried Talisker 10. I confess, I still didn't care for the peat too much, but I was finally able to discern a bit more complexity of flavors behind the peat. The bottle of Talisker lingered untouched in the back of my liquor cabinet for awhile as many other single malts came and went. Then one day not too long ago, after I'd come to love the aforementioned lightly peated malts, I made a return trip to Talisker. Holy crap, this stuff was GREAT all of a sudden! It was the same bottle I'd once thought was "meh," so what had changed? Suddenly, I was tasting and appreciating notes of honey, smoked cherry, almonds, cream, oak, and chili spices in the background. Where did that come from all of a sudden? This experience caused me to buy another bottle of Talisker 10, and eventually Talisker 18. 

With my newfound appreciation for the peaty/smoky stuff, I thought maybe I should give Lagavulin one more chance and picked up a bottle of 16. Just as I suspected might happen, it now seemed much more complex and interesting than I'd remembered the 12 being. I not only liked it, I actually liked it really well! This lead to me taking a chance and going full tilt peat monster with the purchase of these two Islay malts this week.

It finally dawned on me what's going on here with my about-face on peat. With pretty much all other elements in the flavor profiles of whiskies, I can relate the notes back to familiar tastes in other foods and drinks. Not so with peat. When I first heard the "peaty" description in tasting notes, I had no idea what that meant. So, when I had that first taste of Lagavulin, the peat was such an unusual flavor that was unlike anything else I'd ever tasted, it was all I could taste. I was left with the impression that the peat overpowered everything else, rendering the whisky too one-dimensional. I didn't find it revolting; it's just that it was such an unfamiliar taste and it was so "front and center," I couldn't taste anything else initially, as my mind was centered on trying to decipher the peat. If I hadn't tried some other whiskies having less prominent peat so that I could discern other flavors complementing the bitter peat smoke, I may have never returned to the Islay malts again. I'm glad I gave it another chance.

Back to the two whiskies at hand...
Both have a very similar nose. Big smoke! I've decided heavy peat kinda reminds me of a combination of struck matches, imitation bacon bits, and the musty smell of a horse...in a good way, impossible as that may seem! I can discern some sweetness in the background, with maybe a little citrus.

The Ardbeg was first.
Taste-wise, the peaty smoke was immediate, but on the front of the tongue was an initial molasses or syrup-like sweetness. Maybe a slight barbecue flavor in there. On the back and sides of my tongue, I started getting notes of dark chocolate, roasted coffee, a bit of praline/pecan pie, cherries, and charred smoked meat.

It finished with sherry, some caramel cream, white pepper, and more peaty smoke. 

Fantastic!

Next, the Laphroaig...
Like the Ardbeg, it starts out with powerful smoke, but with a more immediate sweetness on the front of the tongue that reminded me of vanilla ice cream. This transformed into a white chocolate-like taste with oak and malt.

The finish was more nutmeg, chili pepper, and of course, more smoke.

I thought it was excellent too!

Both would go very well with smoked red meat, I think. Both would be excellent on a cold day in front of a warm fire.

It was close, but I think maybe I like the Ardbeg Uigeadail ever so slightly better. It was close enough that this is subject to change with repeated tastings.

I can't say I'd want to drink these often. I don't think I'd enjoy every dram of single malt I drink to blitzkrieg my mouth like these. It might render my taste buds jaded to more subtle whiskies. Variety is the spice of life. Nevertheless, these Islay malts will now have a permanent place in my single malt rotation.

I updated my OP and added them to my ranking.



-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: koshkin
Date Posted: February/01/2018 at 15:41
Very detailed notes.

Talisker is still my favorite overall. I like both 10 and 18, but you should really try the 25.

ILya

-------------
http://www.opticsthoughts.com - www.opticsthoughts.com
http://fb.me/DarkLordOfOptics - Facebook
The greatest obstacle to discovery is the illusion of knowledge


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/01/2018 at 16:26
Yeah, I do like Talisker 10 and 18 a little better than the Islay stuff...so far.

-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: mike650
Date Posted: February/01/2018 at 16:48


-------------
Fish to Live, Live to Hunt


Posted By: Peddler
Date Posted: February/01/2018 at 19:10
Talisker if I’m having a “ wee dram “.

Jameson cuz of my heritage but I’m thinkin´ there may be a “ Red Breast “ on the horizon! 😂👍🥃.

-------------
When you are dead, you don't know you are dead.It is difficult only for others.

It is the same when you are stupid.


Posted By: Kickboxer
Date Posted: February/02/2018 at 03:35

One of my very favorite "peaty" tastings was Macallan Rare Cask Black...one of the most amazing I have ever tasted.  I also keep a bottle of Macallan 21 and Macallan 18 for a completely different taste.  Some of the surprises I've found are Johnny Walker Blue and Johnny Walker Green.  The Blue is a little bit expensive in my book, but one of the SMOOTHEST and most flavorful scotches I've ever tasted.  I recently ran across a bottle of Johnny Walker Green Label aged in rye casks (said it was a limited edition)... I shared it with my crew out here.  It hit my "top 10 list".  Glenmorangie 18 is probably my favorite of all, but the Macallan 18 gives it a hard run. 

Let me recommend to you... when tasting a fine whisky, NEVER put ice in it.  It you want it chilled, refrigerate the bottle in a wine refrigerator.  Pour your whisky in a clean dry glass and add just a SPLASH of water (which will open up the flavors).  Then enjoy.  As ice melts, it dilutes the whisky and you lose the intricate, some almost hidden, flavors.  You will never get the full "taste" with ice. I have tried the stainless steel cubes a couple of times... jury is still out.  Probably won't use them with some of the better whiskies. 



-------------
Opinion,untempered by fact,is ignorance.

There are some who do not fear death... for they are more afraid of not really living


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: February/02/2018 at 04:00
Agree on the splash. Ideally water which isn't chlorinated and for personal preference 50/50 with your scotch.

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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: February/02/2018 at 05:57
Image result







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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/02/2018 at 06:21
I never put ice in Scotch. Not even the stainless steel cubes. I reserve ice for mixers, but never with Scotch. I do add a splash of water to a dram. It does help unlock flavors. For high ABV and cask strength Scotches, I add a bit larger splash, in stuff below 46% and in less assertive Scotches, just a few drops. Sometimes it does improve the nose and taste experience, sometimes not, but it never hurts.

As far as extra matured Scotch is concerned, 18 years is generally the cutoff point where I’m still willing to pay for it, with notable exceptions like Macallan 18, which has become too expensive in comparison to other quality 18s. I’m just not willing to spend upwards of $200 a bottle, no matter how good it is. The oldest age statement Scotch I did buy and still have some onhand is Old Pulteney 21. I think it’s fantastic whisky! It was at the upper limit, maybe even a bit beyond the upper limit of what I’m typically willing to spend, but I felt like splurging at the time.

-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: SVT_Tactical
Date Posted: February/02/2018 at 09:25

Love asking this from others - for a newb.... I.e. someone who hardly drinks liquors or any type......

What would be a recommended whiskey/scotch/ sipping drink that would not be to harsh?  

We've debated this often amongst some of my poker buddies at games..... I normally offer up some apple pie moonshine as its very mild however it will slip up on you if you sip to fast, but want to know what you'd take to a gathering where a few folks want to try stuff but you don't' want to give them a bad experience.

Beer is normally not allowed during games.



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"Most folks are about as happy as they make their minds up to be" - Abraham Lincoln


Posted By: mike650
Date Posted: February/02/2018 at 09:40
Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:



Glenmorangie 18 is probably my favorite of all, but the Macallan 18 gives it a hard run. 

Let me recommend to you... when tasting a fine whisky, NEVER put ice in it.  It you want it chilled, refrigerate the bottle in a wine refrigerator.  Pour your whisky in a clean dry glass and add just a SPLASH of water (which will open up the flavors).  Then enjoy.  As ice melts, it dilutes the whisky and you lose the intricate, some almost hidden, flavors.  You will never get the full "taste" with ice.



+1 on the Macallan 18

Going to have to try the splash of water technique. Thunbs Up


-------------
Fish to Live, Live to Hunt


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/02/2018 at 09:55
Originally posted by Scrumbag Scrumbag wrote:

...and for personal preference 50/50 with your scotch.

Oh wow, that's a lot of water! I never add more than a few drops, maybe a half teaspoon at the most, especially if it's a light, delicate single malt. The most I'll ever add to a dram is around a teaspoon or so to really bold flavored Scotch like Aberlour A'bunadh cask strength. I don't want to dilute the flavors, just use enough water to open up the flavors.


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/02/2018 at 10:01
Originally posted by SVT_Tactical SVT_Tactical wrote:

Love asking this from others - for a newb.... I.e. someone who hardly drinks liquors or any type......

What would be a recommended whiskey/scotch/ sipping drink that would not be to harsh?  


One very mild-mannered Scotch that I'd recommend as a good "intro" for people who have never tried Scotch before is Glenmorangie Original 10 year old. As a bonus, it's also very reasonably priced, yet is excellent for the price.



-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: koshkin
Date Posted: February/02/2018 at 10:48
Glenmorangie is a very good "introductory" Scotch.  Also, Glenrothes is surprisingly decent.  Another one that is not very common, but is, IMO, the best of the mild scotches is Cardhu.

Generally, for anyone who likes Speyside scotches, if you havn't tried Cardhu, you are missing out.

ILya


-------------
http://www.opticsthoughts.com - www.opticsthoughts.com
http://fb.me/DarkLordOfOptics - Facebook
The greatest obstacle to discovery is the illusion of knowledge


Posted By: Kickboxer
Date Posted: February/03/2018 at 04:43
Originally posted by SVT_Tactical SVT_Tactical wrote:

Love asking this from others - for a newb.... I.e. someone who hardly drinks liquors or any type......

What would be a recommended whiskey/scotch/ sipping drink that would not be to harsh?  

We've debated this often amongst some of my poker buddies at games..... I normally offer up some apple pie moonshine as its very mild however it will slip up on you if you sip to fast, but want to know what you'd take to a gathering where a few folks want to try stuff but you don't' want to give them a bad experience.

Beer is normally not allowed during games.

For a blended whisky, Famous Grouse is very, very hard to beat... especially at the price.

For a single malt Glenmorangie Lasanta... 12 year old aged in sherry casks.  It is the "newest" of the sherry cask aged Glenmorangie.  Is a bit higher alcohol content, but still VERY smooth and reasonably priced.  I still have some of the "old" stuff, but the Lasanta is excellent.



-------------
Opinion,untempered by fact,is ignorance.

There are some who do not fear death... for they are more afraid of not really living


Posted By: BeltFed
Date Posted: February/03/2018 at 11:47
Trying all these Scotches sounds like trying all the Bourbons; if you did it, there wouldn't be time to be sober, and you couldn't remember which one you liked best.

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Life's concerns should be about the 120lb pack your trying to get to the top of the mountain, and not the rock in your boot.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/03/2018 at 12:05
I think Glenmorangie as a whole brand is usually a good choice for "introductory" single malts. I say usually, because they keep coming up with so many designer variations on the same basic signature style with fancy-sounding sub-names that it's hard to keep up with them all. Their signature style is a more mellow, approachable flavored single malt than most. I recommended their 10 year old Original version as an intro Scotch as much because it is inexpensive as its mellow, non-harsh flavor profile. That way, if one doesn't like it, they aren't out much money, and if they do like it, it's a good intro to Glenmo's more expensive offerings.

For clarification on Lasanta, it is only "finished" in sherry casks for the last 2 years of its maturation, not entirely matured in sherry casks. The first 10 years, it's aged in ex-bourbon casks, the same as all Glenmorangie whiskies. I agree it's excellent, and also agree that it would be a good choice for someone interested in trying a single malt for the first time. I think the same can be said for their other two 12-year old single malts, Nectar D'Or and Quinta Ruban. These 4 make up Glenmo's so-called "core" group of whiskies, which is to say the 4 most commonly found in stores, and the 4 that are at least somewhat inexpensive (by single malt Scotch standards, that is). Lasanta, Nectar, and Quinta all start out as their same 10-year old Original, that then are "finish" matured for an extra 2 more years in different types of casks. Lasanta is finished in ex-sherry casks, Nectar D'Or is finished in ex-Sauternes wine casks, and Quinta Ruban is finished in ex-port wine casks. All 3 are outstanding IMO, only different. Of those 3, I like Nectar D'Or the best personally, followed by Quinta Ruban and Lasanta.


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/03/2018 at 12:29
On the subject of Glenmorangie, it is one of my favorite distilleries overall. If you want variety, Glenmo has it. They have something to offer in all price ranges and tastes it seems. It's tough to keep up with all their variants. 

I've liked everything I've tried so far from Glenmo, but I am annoyed by their tendency to come up with so many "no age statement" whiskies of late. This isn't unique to Glenmo, however; it seems most distilleries are increasingly omitting age statements. NAS Scotch in general kinda pisses me off. I think too often it's an example of marketing over substance. Badge whisky with less time (and with it, cost) involved in its production with pretentious-sounding marketing and fancy packaging, and sell it for more money. With the explosion of NAS whiskies, some of these distilleries seemingly put more effort into marketing hype and packaging artwork than into the actual whisky residing in the bottle. Age statements give the customer a better idea of the relative quality and care that went into its production. I believe the distilleries should be more transparent with the consumer on what they are buying, and single malt Scotch has always carried the reputation as a more premium product. 
 
Age statement or NAS, ultimately the proof of quality is in the tasting, and extra long maturation is no guarantee that any given whisky will be "better" than some other younger whisky. Your own taste buds provide the final verdict. But at least putting an age statement on the label gives the buyer a better idea of what they are getting for money spent as compared to a younger age whisky from the same distillery. 


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: sucker76
Date Posted: February/05/2018 at 17:42
I am very new to the whisky game. My first experience with scotch was sneaking a sip from dad's glass when I was maybe 9. It was horrible! I haven't liked it since. I started drinking bourbons and liked them a lot more. Well I didn't want a old memory of too young taste buds to tarnish a good scotch so I recently tried it again. I tried Johnny Walker Red Label. I couldn't overcome the sharp taste of the scotch. Is the red label a decent scotch or not? Will the Glemorangie be better for a newcomer?

On to the bourbons. I haven't had a whole lot or variety. I do like Makers Mark for sipping. Jack Daniels mixed with Sprite is surprisingly refreshing.


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Stamp collecting since 2015


Posted By: Peddler
Date Posted: February/05/2018 at 17:45
Originally posted by sucker76 sucker76 wrote:

I am very new to the whisky game. My first experience with scotch was sneaking a sip from dad's glass when I was maybe 9. It was horrible! I haven't liked it since. I started drinking bourbons and liked them a lot more. Well I didn't want a old memory of too young taste buds to tarnish a good scotch so I recently tried it again. I tried Johnny Walker Red Label. I couldn't overcome the sharp taste of the scotch. Is the red label a decent scotch or not? Will the Glemorangie be better for a newcomer?

On to the bourbons. I haven't had a whole lot or variety. I do like Makers Mark for sipping. Jack Daniels mixed with Sprite is surprisingly refreshing.


Try Blantons 👍🥃..   

No Sprite 😂😂😂😂😂!

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When you are dead, you don't know you are dead.It is difficult only for others.

It is the same when you are stupid.


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: February/05/2018 at 18:25
I once SAW a bottle of Red Breast!!!   Big Grin

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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Peddler
Date Posted: February/05/2018 at 19:22
😂🥃💥

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When you are dead, you don't know you are dead.It is difficult only for others.

It is the same when you are stupid.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/05/2018 at 19:33
Originally posted by sucker76 sucker76 wrote:

I am very new to the whisky game. My first experience with scotch was sneaking a sip from dad's glass when I was maybe 9. It was horrible! I haven't liked it since. I started drinking bourbons and liked them a lot more. Well I didn't want a old memory of too young taste buds to tarnish a good scotch so I recently tried it again. I tried Johnny Walker Red Label. I couldn't overcome the sharp taste of the scotch. Is the red label a decent scotch or not? Will the Glemorangie be better for a newcomer?

On to the bourbons. I haven't had a whole lot or variety. I do like Makers Mark for sipping. Jack Daniels mixed with Sprite is surprisingly refreshing.

The thing about Scotch is, there's such a huge variation in styles and flavor profiles that one brand and variation of Scotch can taste completely different from another made in a different distillery in a different region of Scotland...so much so that one might think they're from entirely different classification of spirits. So, whenever I hear someone say that they tried Scotch once and hated it but like other types of whiskies, I can't help but believe they simply tried one of a style that doesn't suit their taste. Or, they tried a cheap blend. Not all Scotch is created close to equal. The thing that makes Scotch "Scotch" is that is whisky distilled in Scotland out of malted barley then aged in oak barrels for no less than 3 years. Apart from that, there can be many differences in distillation and aging techniques that have a profoundly different effect on the end result. Some Scotch whiskies can be very smoky and therefore can taste harsh and bitter to someone trying it for the first time. Others have no smokiness whatsoever.

Even when taking account the differences in flavors between distilleries, on top that, there are 2 main classifications of Scotch whisky -- single malt Scotch and blended Scotch. Single malt Scotch is whisky made at a single distillery, and blended Scotch, as its name implies, is a blend of single malts from multiple distilleries. The Johnny Walker Red you tried is a blend, and is considered their "low end" blend. I haven't tried JW Red, so I can't identify its taste to compare to something else. I only have single malts in my booze cabinet and haven't had a blend in a long time. All those I mentioned in my OP are single malts.

Bourbon has many things in common with Scotch in its production, except instead of being distilled from malted barley, it's distilled from at least 51% corn (though may also contain rye or other grains in its mash bill, provided corn comprises at least 51%). Corn mash generally makes Bourbon a bit sweeter than Scotch on average.

If you like bourbon, I think Balvenie Doublewood 12 has close to a Bourbon flavor to my tastebuds. Glenmorangie Original 10 is not far off, as it is matured in ex-Bourbon barrels. Neither are quite as sweet as Bourbon. Both are good "introductory" Scotches to try. Another good intro single malt Scotch to try is Dalwhinnie 15. It doesn't taste anywhere close to Bourbon, but it is light and mellow, and has a honey-like sweetness to it.




-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: sucker76
Date Posted: February/05/2018 at 20:02
Thanks I'll give them a try. I know I haven't had enough variety to say I don't like scotch. I just know I didn't like the ones I've tried. I'm always open to try most anything.


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Stamp collecting since 2015


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/05/2018 at 20:12
Another thing to consider is the "younger" whiskies are generally harsher than older aged whiskies. Longer maturation in the oak barrel imparts more complex flavors and tends to round off the hard edges. On the negative side, longer maturation period also increases the price, sometimes considerably.

-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: Kickboxer
Date Posted: February/06/2018 at 07:11
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

I think Glenmorangie as a whole brand is usually a good choice for "introductory" single malts. I say usually, because they keep coming up with so many designer variations on the same basic signature style with fancy-sounding sub-names that it's hard to keep up with them all. Their signature style is a more mellow, approachable flavored single malt than most. I recommended their 10 year old Original version as an intro Scotch as much because it is inexpensive as its mellow, non-harsh flavor profile. That way, if one doesn't like it, they aren't out much money, and if they do like it, it's a good intro to Glenmo's more expensive offerings.

For clarification on Lasanta, it is only "finished" in sherry casks for the last 2 years of its maturation, not entirely matured in sherry casks. The first 10 years, it's aged in ex-bourbon casks, the same as all Glenmorangie whiskies. I agree it's excellent, and also agree that it would be a good choice for someone interested in trying a single malt for the first time. I think the same can be said for their other two 12-year old single malts, Nectar D'Or and Quinta Ruban. These 4 make up Glenmo's so-called "core" group of whiskies, which is to say the 4 most commonly found in stores, and the 4 that are at least somewhat inexpensive (by single malt Scotch standards, that is). Lasanta, Nectar, and Quinta all start out as their same 10-year old Original, that then are "finish" matured for an extra 2 more years in different types of casks. Lasanta is finished in ex-sherry casks, Nectar D'Or is finished in ex-Sauternes wine casks, and Quinta Ruban is finished in ex-port wine casks. All 3 are outstanding IMO, only different. Of those 3, I like Nectar D'Or the best personally, followed by Quinta Ruban and Lasanta.

For clarification on Lasanta, verbally, finishing and aging are the same thing... merely implies the movement of the product from one cask type to another... for extra "aging".  Sometimes called "maturing"...  merely taking on qualities imparted by the sherry to the wood of the cask. In most cases, it mellows the taste, adds new flavors the oak-bourbon casks are not capable of. 

I prefer the Lasanta of those mentioned, but overall, I prefer the original Glenmoranie Finished in Sherry Casks:

"A Glenmorangie finished in Sherry Casks that demonstrates clearly the effects finishing can have on a whisky. The distillery character is there but you can definitely taste the Oloroso. This is aged for a total of 12 years despite there being no age statement on the bottle."

At 19, in the US, one is considered "too young" to drink.  At 21 they are considered to have matured enough to drink.  In the whole process, they have still aged.



-------------
Opinion,untempered by fact,is ignorance.

There are some who do not fear death... for they are more afraid of not really living


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/06/2018 at 14:06
Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

For clarification on Lasanta, verbally, finishing and aging are the same thing... merely implies the movement of the product from one cask type to another... for extra "aging".  Sometimes called "maturing"...  merely taking on qualities imparted by the sherry to the wood of the cask. In most cases, it mellows the taste, adds new flavors the oak-bourbon casks are not capable of. 

I prefer the Lasanta of those mentioned, but overall, I prefer the original Glenmoranie Finished in Sherry Casks:

"A Glenmorangie finished in Sherry Casks that demonstrates clearly the effects finishing can have on a whisky. The distillery character is there but you can definitely taste the Oloroso. This is aged for a total of 12 years despite there being no age statement on the bottle."

At 19, in the US, one is considered "too young" to drink.  At 21 they are considered to have matured enough to drink.  In the whole process, they have still aged.


I'm not confused by the terms and didn't contradict any of that, Dan. I said it wasn't entirely matured in sherry, as your original statement about it would seem to imply. Of course finishing is aging, though the word "finishing," as per the meaning of the word, is a term used by the industry to mean a shorter duration of time in a specific cask type distinctly different from the original cask used for the majority of the aging, done at the end of the maturation period. I was merely pointing out that only 2 years of its 12 years of aging was spent in sherry casks; the remaining 10 in bourbon casks, that's all. This is important because it has a distinctly different taste than a whisky that has spent its entire maturation period in a sherry cask, as it still retains the characteristic vanilla notes that the bourbon casks impart to Glenmo Original.

The original Sherry Wood Finish Glenmo was discontinued and replaced by Lasanta sometime around 10 years ago as part of a rebranding campaign. Though some variation in taste over time isn't uncommon with most distilleries, Lasanta is supposedly the same thing as the old Glenmo Sherry Wood Finish, except with a different looking label, new sub-name, and an age statement added.


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/06/2018 at 15:13
I haven't tried Aberlour 16 Double Cask, but have tried their 12 and have some of their 18 at the house. Given I really like 12, and I love 18 and A'bunadh, I have no doubt I'd like the 16 too.

-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: mike650
Date Posted: February/06/2018 at 16:12


-------------
Fish to Live, Live to Hunt


Posted By: koshkin
Date Posted: February/06/2018 at 19:06
This is not going to be terribly popular, but while I generally like Glenmorangie whiskys, their Sherry finished stuff is just not great.

Try sherry finished Kilchoman and you will understand.  Ted, do you want me to bring you one when I come visit? (yes, folks, there are certain whisky benefits to being friendly with the Dark Lord...)

ILya



-------------
http://www.opticsthoughts.com - www.opticsthoughts.com
http://fb.me/DarkLordOfOptics - Facebook
The greatest obstacle to discovery is the illusion of knowledge


Posted By: Peddler
Date Posted: February/06/2018 at 19:38
Originally posted by tahqua tahqua wrote:

We aren't sure what Speyside we will have when we put my friends Gordon Setters ashes out in front of my beach on Gitchie Gumee. We are looking for the distillery closest to Gordon Castle.
One thing for sure, there will be Ugly Dog Vodka for Sadie's ashes at the same time.



👍🥃🐶. I’ve done it a number of times my friend.

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When you are dead, you don't know you are dead.It is difficult only for others.

It is the same when you are stupid.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/06/2018 at 21:39
Originally posted by koshkin koshkin wrote:

Try sherry finished Kilchoman and you will understand.  Ted, do you want me to bring you one when I come visit? (yes, folks, there are certain whisky benefits to being friendly with the Dark Lord...)

ILya


Yes sir! Thanks in advance!

Did you expect me to say something different? Ha!


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/06/2018 at 22:06
Originally posted by tahqua tahqua wrote:

We are looking for the distillery closest to Gordon Castle.


It looks to me like that may be Inchgower, which according to Google Maps, is located about 8 miles NE of Gordon Castle.


-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: February/07/2018 at 03:30
Some of the Sherry finishes can be a "little interesting". I suspect not the easiest thing to get right. Thought when it works is great

Scrummy


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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: Kickboxer
Date Posted: February/07/2018 at 03:59
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

For clarification on Lasanta, verbally, finishing and aging are the same thing... merely implies the movement of the product from one cask type to another... for extra "aging".  Sometimes called "maturing"...  merely taking on qualities imparted by the sherry to the wood of the cask. In most cases, it mellows the taste, adds new flavors the oak-bourbon casks are not capable of. 

I prefer the Lasanta of those mentioned, but overall, I prefer the original Glenmoranie Finished in Sherry Casks:

"A Glenmorangie finished in Sherry Casks that demonstrates clearly the effects finishing can have on a whisky. The distillery character is there but you can definitely taste the Oloroso. This is aged for a total of 12 years despite there being no age statement on the bottle."

At 19, in the US, one is considered "too young" to drink.  At 21 they are considered to have matured enough to drink.  In the whole process, they have still aged.


I'm not confused by the terms and didn't contradict any of that, Dan. I said it wasn't entirely matured in sherry, as your original statement about it would seem to imply. Of course finishing is aging, though the word "finishing," as per the meaning of the word, is a term used by the industry to mean a shorter duration of time in a specific cask type distinctly different from the original cask used for the majority of the aging, done at the end of the maturation period. I was merely pointing out that only 2 years of its 12 years of aging was spent in sherry casks; the remaining 10 in bourbon casks, that's all. This is important because it has a distinctly different taste than a whisky that has spent its entire maturation period in a sherry cask, as it still retains the characteristic vanilla notes that the bourbon casks impart to Glenmo Original.

The original Sherry Wood Finish Glenmo was discontinued and replaced by Lasanta sometime around 10 years ago as part of a rebranding campaign. Though some variation in taste over time isn't uncommon with most distilleries, Lasanta is supposedly the same thing as the old Glenmo Sherry Wood Finish, except with a different looking label, new sub-name, and an age statement added.

It is NOT the same...

Yes, if a scotch spends its entire aging process in sherry casks, it will be unique indeed, not common, generally above average... try Glenfarclas 17.  Then, if you feel really ambitious, try a 40 year old... it'll change your life.

So, Ted, in the last two years of your life... were you maturing or aging???



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Opinion,untempered by fact,is ignorance.

There are some who do not fear death... for they are more afraid of not really living


Posted By: bugsNbows
Date Posted: February/07/2018 at 05:42
Cheers

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If we're not suppose to eat animals...how come they're made of meat?
               Anomymous


Posted By: BeltFed
Date Posted: February/07/2018 at 09:11
Ted, Dan are yall gonna fight over scotch too? I suggest you two settle this like gentlemen and have a duel. Back to back armed with ten bottles of your favorite varieties of scotch, take ten paces, turn and match each other drink for drink. Last man standing wins.




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Life's concerns should be about the 120lb pack your trying to get to the top of the mountain, and not the rock in your boot.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/07/2018 at 09:20
Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

It is NOT the same...

OK, Dan, good to know. I'll take your word for it.

Perhaps you should take that up with Glenmorangie, as they disagree with you.


Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

Yes, if a scotch spends its entire aging process in sherry casks, it will be unique indeed, not common, generally above average... try Glenfarclas 17.  Then, if you feel really ambitious, try a 40 year old... it'll change your life.

Other examples that are entirely sherry cask aged include, but are in no way limited to:

Some releases from Macallan 

Most, if not all of Highland Park

Some Kilchoman

Some Aberlour (namely A'bunadh)

Some Dalmore

Some Ardbeg

Some Buhhahabhain

Lasanta is not intended to be like the so-called "sherry bombs." Aging in sherry casks can often produce a very strong flavor. The goal for Lasanta was to maintain the basic signature flavor of Glenmo's house style with the sherry adding an enhancement, not overpowering the basic house style. It is essentially a "designer" version of their Original with an added sherry influence. 


Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

So, Ted, in the last two years of your life... were you maturing or aging???


I'm not sure why a very benign comment of mine has triggered you to play the synonym game over minutiae. I thought I was very clear in what I said and why.

"Finishing" is indeed aging, albeit for an abbreviated period of time, and at the very end of the process. Aging isn't necessarily finishing, however. There is a very important distinction there. As the term is used in the whisky industry, they are most definitely not the same thing as you asserted. "Finishing" is a distinct term the industry uses, wholly separate from "aging" or "maturing." The Scotch whisky regulations are very specific in what terms the distilleries are allowed to use in their marketing for consumer protection. To be considered "aged in" or "matured in" whatever type of cask, legally, the whisky must reside in that cask for a minimum of 3 years. 

http://www.scotch-whisky.org.uk/understanding-scotch/faqs/ - http://www.scotch-whisky.org.uk/understanding-scotch/faqs/

https://flaviar.com/blog/whisky-ageing-maturation-and-finish-difference - https://flaviar.com/blog/whisky-ageing-maturation-and-finish-difference


https://www.whisky.com/information/knowledge/production/background-knowledge/types-of-whisky-casks/whisky-in-oloroso-sherry-casks.html - https://www.whisky.com/information/knowledge/production/background-knowledge/types-of-whisky-casks/whisky-in-oloroso-sherry-casks.html


 




-------------
Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: BeltFed
Date Posted: February/07/2018 at 09:38
I've lived in south Looneyville most of my life. There used to be a bunch of large distilleries in south Looneyville along with a cooperage that is still there. It was not uncommon back when I was a kid to get the smells of the mash from the different distilleries, as well as the smell of burning oak as they charred the barrels at the cooperage. I had an aunt that lived on Southern Parkway on the east side of Churchill Downs, and the distilleries were on 7th Street, just west of Churchill downs. There the aroma of the mash was very different, and very pleasing. I can still remember some of those smells, even though I haven't smelled them in decades. All of those distilleries are gone now; moved to other parts of the state, or closed. Old Forester and Seagrams Seven, and maybe Old Crow were a few that I remember on 7th St. The smell of mash and aging bourbon was a unique experience.

The other morning, one of my captains rolled in, and asked what was burning. I took a quick whiff of the air, and told him it was the cooperage on the other side of the airport charring barrels, don't get excited, nothing's burning down.


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Life's concerns should be about the 120lb pack your trying to get to the top of the mountain, and not the rock in your boot.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/07/2018 at 13:04
Interestingly, Lynn, the Scotch whisky industry has a cooperative relationship with the American bourbon industry. For example, Glenmorangie buys oak trees in the Ozarks and has them coopered into casks. They then lease the barrels to Jack Daniels for however many years is required for aging their various whiskies. Then, Jack Daniels ships the barrels to Glenmo in Scotland. This relationship is perfect for both parties, as Jack Daniels is aged in charred new (not previously containing other spirits) oak barrels, and Glenmo ages their whiskies in ex-bourbon barrels. Both companies get what they need and it is a more resource efficient, cost effective use of the oak. Even though Jack Daniels is not technically considered a bourbon because they deviate from the bourbon process somewhat with their charcoal filtering, they do adhere to the same requirement of bourbons to age in new oak barrels.

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Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: sucker76
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 01:11
Jack Daniels cant legaly be called bourbon. That is why it's called Kentucky straight whisky.


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Stamp collecting since 2015


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 03:26
Originally posted by sucker76 sucker76 wrote:

Jack Daniels cant legaly be called bourbon. That is why it's called Kentucky straight whisky.

And that's one of the politer things I've heard it called...


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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 04:51
I once knew a guy who drank Jack Daniels....you could smell it from 10 feet away!!     Big Grin

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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 04:57
Image result for hot glamour pussy with whisky




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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 05:06
Originally posted by Son of Ed Son of Ed wrote:

I once knew a guy who drank Jack Daniels....you could smell it from 10 feet away!!     Big Grin

*SHUDDERS*


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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: Kickboxer
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 05:16
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

It is NOT the same...

OK, Dan, good to know. I'll take your word for it.

Perhaps you should take that up with Glenmorangie, as they disagree with you.


Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

Yes, if a scotch spends its entire aging process in sherry casks, it will be unique indeed, not common, generally above average... try Glenfarclas 17.  Then, if you feel really ambitious, try a 40 year old... it'll change your life.

Other examples that are entirely sherry cask aged include, but are in no way limited to:

Some releases from Macallan 

Most, if not all of Highland Park

Some Kilchoman

Some Aberlour (namely A'bunadh)

Some Dalmore

Some Ardbeg

Some Buhhahabhain

Lasanta is not intended to be like the so-called "sherry bombs." Aging in sherry casks can often produce a very strong flavor. The goal for Lasanta was to maintain the basic signature flavor of Glenmo's house style with the sherry adding an enhancement, not overpowering the basic house style. It is essentially a "designer" version of their Original with an added sherry influence. 


Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

So, Ted, in the last two years of your life... were you maturing or aging???


I'm not sure why a very benign comment of mine has triggered you to play the synonym game over minutiae. I thought I was very clear in what I said and why.

"Finishing" is indeed aging, albeit for an abbreviated period of time, and at the very end of the process. Aging isn't necessarily finishing, however. There is a very important distinction there. As the term is used in the whisky industry, they are most definitely not the same thing as you asserted. "Finishing" is a distinct term the industry uses, wholly separate from "aging" or "maturing." The Scotch whisky regulations are very specific in what terms the distilleries are allowed to use in their marketing for consumer protection. To be considered "aged in" or "matured in" whatever type of cask, legally, the whisky must reside in that cask for a minimum of 3 years. 

http://www.scotch-whisky.org.uk/understanding-scotch/faqs/ - http://www.scotch-whisky.org.uk/understanding-scotch/faqs/

https://flaviar.com/blog/whisky-ageing-maturation-and-finish-difference - https://flaviar.com/blog/whisky-ageing-maturation-and-finish-difference


https://www.whisky.com/information/knowledge/production/background-knowledge/types-of-whisky-casks/whisky-in-oloroso-sherry-casks.html - https://www.whisky.com/information/knowledge/production/background-knowledge/types-of-whisky-casks/whisky-in-oloroso-sherry-casks.html


 



Why so serious???

(it was a joke, Ted)

It is ALL still aging...

The http://www.glenmorangie.com/ -

This is the bottle I have (that is not Lasanta)... no mention of Lasanta.  Purchased on a trip overseas and the lady who sold it said it was not exported.  But that was a while back... could be now.  There is no tannin taste, no alcohol "burn"... smooth, creamy, butterscotch, vanilla, juniper and honeysuckle.  A real treat.  It is not the same as the 46% or 43% Lasanta. 

Try the port wood finished, BTW. 



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Opinion,untempered by fact,is ignorance.

There are some who do not fear death... for they are more afraid of not really living


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 05:36
Image result for george burns

" If Eduardo gets an Income Tax refund he may buy a bottle...." 











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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: BeltFed
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 06:55
Jack Daniels is NOT Kentucky whiskey! It is made in Tennessee and does not even taste like bourbon. It is good whiskey, but it is not bourbon, it is a Tennessee whiskey.

Ted your right about the bourbon barrels. Most bourbon barrels go to Scotland after they have been used, since they can't be reused for bourbon.

Many years ago, the distilleries used to sell the used barrels to whoever would buy them. Many of the locals would buy the barrels and sweat them, and get a decent amount of straight whiskey from the barrel. Of course a little bootlegging went on, but that was before my time.


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Life's concerns should be about the 120lb pack your trying to get to the top of the mountain, and not the rock in your boot.


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 07:08
Yes lots of Bourbon barrels do get shipped to Scotland for Whisky making.

Speaking of wood finishes, one of my favourites is the 15 yo Glenlivet French Oak Reserve which is aged in Limousin white oak barrels. Tastes smooth, delicate and rather morish.

Scrummy


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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 09:08
Lynn, I always heard that to be considered a bourbon, it had to be made in Kentucky. Most bourbons are made in Kentucky. However despite commonly held belief, there is no legal requirement for a bourbon to be made in KY; they just have to be made in the US. Hudson Baby (NY) and Breckinridge (CO) are both classified as bourbons but aren’t made in KY.

According to Jack Daniels, it isn’t considered a bourbon because of their “special” charcoal filtering they do prior to filling into the barrels. There is nothing in the legal requirements for bourbon prohibiting this process, so technically, they could probably get away with calling their whiskey bourbon. Otherwise, they follow the “bourbon” making process verbatim. I suspect they’ve intentionally chosen to not use the bourbon label for marketing reasons so they can tout their unique charcoal filtering process, which they claim mellows their whiskey. In this way, they can claim they are unique among all other American whiskies.

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Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: BeltFed
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 11:33
Originally posted by RifleDude<b> RifleDude wrote:

Lynn, I always heard that to be considered a bourbon, it had to be made in Kentucky. Most bourbons are made in Kentucky. However despite commonly held belief, there is no legal requirement for a bourbon to be made in KY
; they just have to be made in the US. Hudson Baby (NY) and Breckinridge (CO) are both classified as bourbons but aren’t made in KY.

According to Jack Daniels, it isn’t considered a bourbon because of their “special” charcoal filtering they do prior to filling into the barrels. There is nothing in the legal requirements for bourbon prohibiting this process, so technically, they could probably get away with calling their whiskey bourbon. Otherwise, they follow the “bourbon” making process verbatim. I suspect they’ve intentionally chosen to not use the bourbon label for marketing reasons so they can tout their unique charcoal filtering process, which they claim mellows their whiskey. In this way, they can claim they are unique among all other American whiskies.

Alas, you are right Ted. Jim Beam has plants in both Kentucky and Ohio, and for that I will only drink their Knob Creek bourbon if I ever drink a Jim Beam brand. By the way, Knob Creek is rather harsh IMO, and it will knock your Johnson in the dirt. 


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Life's concerns should be about the 120lb pack your trying to get to the top of the mountain, and not the rock in your boot.


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 11:50
You ever tried Eagle Rare (10 yr old), Lynn? It’s made by Buffalo Trace. It’s basically the standard BT house sauce with extra time in the barrel. Very good bourbon IMO. So far, I think it’s my favorite bourbon, but I like Buffalo Trace, Angel’s Envy, Basil Hayden’s, Booker’s, and Breckinridge almost as much.

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Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: koshkin
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 12:27
Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

You ever tried Eagle Rare (10 yr old), Lynn? It’s made by Buffalo Trace. It’s basically the standard BT house sauce with extra time in the barrel. Very good bourbon IMO. So far, I think it’s my favorite bourbon, but I like Buffalo Trace, Angel’s Envy, Basil Hayden’s, Booker’s, and Breckinridge almost as much.


I really like Buffalo Trace and Breckenridge. Booker's almost as much. Angel's Envy did not write after with me for some reason when I tried it next to Buffalo Trace.

ILya

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http://www.opticsthoughts.com - www.opticsthoughts.com
http://fb.me/DarkLordOfOptics - Facebook
The greatest obstacle to discovery is the illusion of knowledge


Posted By: BeltFed
Date Posted: February/08/2018 at 12:59
Unfortunately no. However, Mrs. BF and I will be going to a nice steak house for our 30th, so I'll see if I can try a shot of the Rare Eagle.


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Life's concerns should be about the 120lb pack your trying to get to the top of the mountain, and not the rock in your boot.


Posted By: Scrumbag
Date Posted: February/09/2018 at 04:10
Happy Anniversary BF!

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Was sure I had a point when I started this post...


Posted By: RifleDude
Date Posted: February/09/2018 at 05:35
Yes indeed, happy anniversary Lynn!

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Ted


Money can't buy happiness... but it's much more comfortable to cry in a Porsche than on a bicycle.


Posted By: tahqua
Date Posted: February/09/2018 at 05:44
Happy Anniversary Lynn

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Doug



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