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Ballistic program differences

Printed From: OpticsTalk by SWFA, Inc.
Category: Firearms, Bows, and Ammunition
Forum Name: Reloading & Ballistics
Forum Description: Anything to do with ammunition
URL: http://www.opticstalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=44466
Printed Date: November/22/2017 at 19:23


Topic: Ballistic program differences
Posted By: tucansam
Subject: Ballistic program differences
Date Posted: November/04/2017 at 22:02
I have a conundrum brewing.

I am using Shooter, Strelok Pro, JBM, and Hornady's calculator from its website.

Using the *exact* same input data, all four calculators are giving me different output, and some of it is off by as much as a full mil at distance (700y)

Based on real-world testing, Strelok appears to be the closest so far, but I have a lot more testing to do.

I'm confused.  While I accept that each program may use slightly different formulas, or apply atmospherics slightly differently, or flat out contain errors, I'm shocked that all four well-known calculators would be so far out of agreement.  This is especially troublesome given the magnitude of popularity of these programs over the last ten years or so -- I assume each one would be fully mature and tested by now, given various user reviews of each.

Does anyone have any comment?

Thanks.



Replies:
Posted By: cstumpf750
Date Posted: November/04/2017 at 23:11
I’d suggest taking a look at this system.

https://ballisticxlr.com/

The author is very knowledgeable and helpful. He’ll be able to explain the discrepancies you are seeing better than I can. But it really comes down to GIGO (garbage in garbage out) and bad assumptions.


Posted By: tucansam
Date Posted: November/04/2017 at 23:50
Thanks, I have been looking at his software for a while and may drop the hammer on it.

GIGO I understand, what I am confused about is four different outcomes using the exact same data (even if it is garbage)


Posted By: Rancid Coolaid
Date Posted: November/05/2017 at 08:26
I’ve used a few calculators in my time, and none are dead on at anything beyond 500-600 yards. This can be attributed to many factors,all of which lead to the same conclusion: Dope is specific to your gun, your ammo, your conditions, your eye, and your trigger pull.

Calculators are all about convenience. When used properly, they are a framework on which you build your data table.

Much like the guy that thought his rifle was zeroed because his scope was bolted to the gun, there is work to be done after most people call it “good.”

A rifle data book is infinitely more valuable to me than is a ballistic calculator. You should be logging every possible variable with every squeeze of the trigger. If yoi’re really serious about it.

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The plural of "anecdote" is not "data."



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