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65 or 80?

Printed From: OpticsTalk by SWFA, Inc.
Category: Other Optics
Forum Name: Spotting Scopes
Forum Description: Big Eye Optics
URL: http://www.opticstalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=15371
Printed Date: November/14/2018 at 20:08


Topic: 65 or 80?
Posted By: Mike VS
Subject: 65 or 80?
Date Posted: February/13/2009 at 05:25
I know the choice of spotter size is like many things in this world an individual preference.  I wanted to get some feedback on what the board uses regarding size based on:
1. a majority of the hours glassing would be for hunting.
2. range use less hours then hunting.
 
Do you bite the bullet and carry the extra weight hunting? Have many of you that use a 65mm hunting ever wish you had a 80mm during your hunt?



Replies:
Posted By: tpcollins
Date Posted: February/13/2009 at 08:20
I'm a newbie here and wound up getting a Stoke Sandpiper 65mm based on the recomendations from this forum, and it will work out great for my deer viewing this summer. Now I'm wanting to get a compact that I can carry in my backpack during deer/turkey hunting - such as a 20x50, 12-24x50, or a 15-30x50. If I'm not wanting to tote my 65mm around, I can't imagine what a 80mm would be like. I carry enough crap in my backpack already so another scope would have to be a compact model. Good luck.


Posted By: lucytuma
Date Posted: February/13/2009 at 09:03

Agreed, I see the 65/80mm scopes as range scopes and 50mm & less as hunting scopes, though you could use the larger scopes for stationary hunting ie: stand or blind.



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"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not." - Thomas Jefferson


Posted By: lucznik
Date Posted: February/13/2009 at 09:04
Originally posted by Mike VS Mike VS wrote:

I know the choice of spotter size is like many things in this world an individual preference.  I wanted to get some feedback on what the board uses regarding size based on:
1. a majority of the hours glassing would be for hunting.
2. range use less hours then hunting.
 
Do you bite the bullet and carry the extra weight hunting? Have many of you that use a 65mm hunting ever wish you had a 80mm during your hunt?
 
The answer to your question is going to be largely dependant on what kind of hunting you do. 
 
I know of only a very few people who will actually carry an 80mm scope hunting in the backcountry for mule deer and elk.  Aside from their weight, they (together with the necessarily-robust tripod that is required to keep the scope steady) take up too much critical space in one's backpack - space that is needed for things like food, water, a sleeping bag, tent, etc.
 
On the other hand, I know lots of people who have them for, say... hunting antelope.  Of course, this is done mostly from the comfort of a vehicle so; the extra weight and bulk is negligible.
 
I have a compact 50mm scope and an 80mm scope.  The big scope is used for most common uses and anytime I'm in/close to a base camp or vehicle.  The small scope is for hiking.  I have, in truth, on occasion found myself wishing I had the bigger scope when I was trying to look at something while deep in the backcountry. After all it is brighter and has much more magnification available.  However, that feeling is always fleeting and is certainly never strong enough to cause me to be truly tempted into ever actually packing that behemoth.
 
The 60-70mm class of scopes seem to be a sort of compromise option best suited to people who are only going to own one scope and/or who are not likely to ever need the extra performance of the bigger scopes (don't digiscope, don't do astronomy, don't go out in bad weather nor early or late in the day, etc.).  They are still big enough to offer very good, even excellent, image quality and yet also small enough that they can be packed around with less difficulty. 
 
If you are truly dedicated to both having the very best image quality you can get AND also to trudging around deep in the backcountry for multiple days at a time with only what you can carry on your back, then I suggest you buy the best combination of 80+mm and 50 (or less)mm scopes you can afford.


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What if the hokey pokey really is what it's all about?


Posted By: jwp475
Date Posted: February/13/2009 at 19:40
 
 To me a spotting scope is all about resolution and definition, so I opt for the larger objectives. Once I have identified what I am after I proceed to stalk with out the spotter. I currently use a Kowa TSN 883 and love it.


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range it,check the wind, dial in correction,aim,squezze and only one Shot......


Posted By: Roy Finn
Date Posted: February/13/2009 at 21:27
What..........an 80mm???? Easy for you to say, you got a horse to carry that thing around..............grin          


Posted By: jwp475
Date Posted: February/13/2009 at 21:36
Originally posted by Roy Finn Roy Finn wrote:

What..........an 80mm???? Easy for you to say, you got a horse to carry that thing around..............grin          
 
 
 
  Sure
 
 
 


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range it,check the wind, dial in correction,aim,squezze and only one Shot......


Posted By: Roy Finn
Date Posted: February/13/2009 at 21:51
yea rub it in with your fancy euro scopes and fancy euro bino's.........


Posted By: jwp475
Date Posted: February/13/2009 at 22:28
Originally posted by Roy Finn Roy Finn wrote:

yea rub it in with your fancy euro scopes and fancy euro bino's.........
 
 
  Sorry, how's this one?
 
 


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range it,check the wind, dial in correction,aim,squezze and only one Shot......



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