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prairie dog shooting and lead

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/26/2007 at 11:02
anweis View Drop Down
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Journal of Wildlife Management

Article: pp. 103–108 | Full Text | PDF (143K)

Recreational Shooting of Prairie Dogs: A Portal for Lead Entering Wildlife Food Chains

JONATHAN N. PAULI1,a, STEVEN W. BUSKIRKb

a Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA
b Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071, USA

Although lead shot has been banned for waterfowl hunting in North America, some predators continue to exhibit elevated lead burdens, which has been attributed to ingesting metallic lead from other projectiles. Few studies have investigated residual lead fragments in hunted upland animals. Therefore, specific portals for lead entering wildlife food chains remain largely unknown. Prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) are shot for recreation with minimal regulation in western North America. Because recreational shooters mostly use expanding bullets and rarely remove or bury carcasses, shot prairie dogs could make lead accessible to predators and scavengers. To determine whether and to what degree shot prairie dogs carry lead fragments, we analyzed carcasses shot by recreational shooters with 2 bullet types. Bullet type influenced the probability of bullet fragments being retained in carcasses; 87% of prairie dogs shot with expanding bullets contained bullet fragments, whereas 7% of carcasses shot with non-expanding bullets did. The amount of bullet fragments per carcass also differed between bullet types; carcasses shot with expanding bullets contained a mean of 228.4 mg of the lead-containing bullet core and 74.4 mg of the copper-alloy jacket, whereas carcasses shot with non-expanding bullets averaged only 19.8 mg of the core and 23.2 mg of the jacket. Lead fragments in carcasses shot with expanding bullets were small in size; 73% of all lead mass in each carcass was from fragments that weighed <25 mg each, small enough to be easily ingested and absorbed by secondary consumers. The amount of lead in a single prairie dog carcass shot with an expanding bullet is potentially sufficient to acutely poison scavengers or predators. Therefore, shot prairie dogs may provide an important portal for lead entering wildlife food chains and may pose risks to raptors and carnivores. Managers should consider measures, such as using non-expanding or lead-free ammunition, to reduce the likelihood of lead consumption and poisoning in upland wildlife.

Keywords: Cynomys, ecotoxicology, environmental toxicology, hunting, lead, poisoning, prairie dog, predators, shooting

DOI: 10.2193/2005-620

1 E-mail: jpauli@uwyo.edu

 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/26/2007 at 11:12
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Like they could enforce it-----
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/26/2007 at 18:16
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you know being that i was born and lived most of my life in the great state of wyoming this really pisses me off that they would even consider such a retarded idea, they need to spend more time and money on things that matter like elk and mule population and killing off the whitetaile deer that spread cwd to mule deer. the most outdoor sports friendly state in the usa and they wanna do prairie dogs a favor come on.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/26/2007 at 19:05
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The animals that get intoxicated by feeding on lead poisoned prairie dogs also matter.

Elk hunters are not the only users of natural resources in this country. In fact, they are a small proportion. So are the people shooting prairie dogs for "sport".

I don't see how the authors of the paper wanted to do prairie dogs a favor. The prairie dogs get shot no matter what, expanding bullets or else.

I assure you that state wildlife agencies study and mange CWD. Wyoming State, Texas A&M, Texas Tech, and many other schools have researchers studying CWD and the westward expansion of the white tailed deer. 

Your future as a hunter is in good hands. That as a white/rural/hunting/outdoors enjoying/hunting fishing dude, however, is not. By 2040 or 2050, 50% of Americans will be non-white, 95% or so will be urban, and these people will not care much about passing legislation and funding for wildlife and natural resources.

So, next time you go elk hunting, do yourself a favor, or rather, do your sons a favor, and take Carlos and Jamal with you to the outdoors. It'll pay off on the long run.



Edited by anweis
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/26/2007 at 22:49
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I have been PD Hunting for years in Kansas & Colorado and have not notice any decline in Coyotes and Hawks that frequent the PD towns. As a matter of fact on one trip two years ago in 3 days we counted 275 hawks around the PD towns and yes they will eat dead PD"S I've see it. But I have never seen dead prediators laying around anywhere, well I guess if Mr Yote eats a PD that I shot and he dies then thats a two for one. The locals that I have talk too over the years tell me that the coyote population is very strong, but Jack rabbits have been spotty lately, so do Jack rabbits eat dead PD's? Sounds like a Job for The University of Wyoming.....
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/27/2007 at 06:05
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rabbit run in 7 years cycles, 7 growth incline populations years and then 7decline popultion years which affects the coyote numbers as well, i saw this a couple of times out there, one year the jack rabbits would be all over the place and so too would the coyotes then the next year you couldnt buy a coyote.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/27/2007 at 18:31
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hmm wonder how fast I could push an all rubber ballistic tip?

 

or how would it be to be re-incarnated as a jack rabbit in mud lake idaho-- for those of you who have been on a rabbit drive.



Edited by Dale Clifford
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/27/2007 at 19:44
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Since a bunch of landowners poison their PD populations, is the presence of poison in dead PDs any less harmful to predators than lead?  If I eat a dove I shot with lead shot, do I have the same risks of trace amts of lead in my body as in the predator example above?  What about big game animals I shoot with lead core bullets -- is there enough lead separating from the jacket to get in the meat that I then ingest?  What about other meat from meat processors who also process wild game -- is it possible that lead particles from many animal carcasses brought in by hunters can congregate on their equipment and be spread into other meat sold?

 

I just never know what to think about any "study," as it's become so difficult to separate the truth from all the junk science, often motivated by political agendas.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/27/2007 at 20:15
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Energy weapons anyone?  They're the only way to be truly "environmentally friendly"....even burns up the carcass (I think the term is cauterize) to limit the threat of disease....say a phased plasma rifle with a 40-watt range?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/28/2007 at 10:15
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Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

it's become so difficult to separate the truth from all the junk science, often motivated by political agendas.

 

The wildlife biologists, members of The Wildlife Society, have some of the strictest moral, ethical, and professional standards. You will find junk science with the appointed committees, but not with the wildlife professors in the nation's schools. Besides, the papers that are published go through a strict peer review. If it looks like junk, smells like junk, or sounds like junk, it gets tossed.

 

Going back to eating game, i've switched to steel shot and copper bullets long ago, for real reasons. The threat of lead ingestion and intoxication is real. With google, you can find how much lead it takes to produce serious consequences. 



Edited by anweis
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/28/2007 at 12:37
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yeah, i am on the fence here. Lead is very desctructive. 

 

Look at the roman empire - they all went insane because of lead poisoning.

 

long story short - they had lead containers for wine - the acid in the wine produced a sweet white powder in the bottom -

they started mass producing this 'powder' to add to wine - early port wine.

 

they drank a ton of it and poisoned themselves. went crazy.

 

if enough bullets enter the foodchain, it could be a problem.  BUT, we are talking about varmints eating varmints.......

for the most part.  We could see a problem as popularity rises.

 

my 2 cents.

 

J

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/30/2007 at 19:51
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the problem i see here is if they get rid of lead tips that means a company like barnes will own the market, i dont see an issue with using lead to me its no different than rancher/farmer poisoning the pdogs, the poison could kill predators as well
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/07/2007 at 17:54
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Those figures sound like the military was shooting pdogs with cannon, 228 mg lead and 75 of copper that is a little over 6oz of lead and 2 oz of copper in a pdog!!!!!!!  A target the size of a beer can with a total of 8 oz of bullet in it sounds a little far out to me

 

Duce   

 

                             

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/07/2007 at 18:58
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I hate being a stickler to number here, but your numbers are a little off, Duce.

228 mg (which denotes milligrams) is 3.518 grains or 0.008 oz.
75 mg is 1.157 grains or 0.0026 oz.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/08/2007 at 06:45
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Last time I checked ( a long time ago) 1000 mg = 1Kg = 2.2 .lbs

I may have to try to find the math book or the converson table on line or was it micrograms.

 

Duce

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/08/2007 at 07:05
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Looks like you like Barnes bullets too....Interesting.

 

"Curiouser and curiouser" cried Alice.

 

 



Edited by cyborg - August/28/2008 at 23:14
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/08/2007 at 08:43
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OOps you are right it is 1000 grams = 1kg

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/08/2007 at 09:19
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Sorry for my reference to Alice in Wonderland.

Would you prefer something from The Wizard of Oz??

 

 

 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/08/2007 at 12:14
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Originally posted by Duce Duce wrote:

OOps you are right it is 1000 grams = 1kg

 

Duce



Yep.  That's correct.  1kg (kilogram)  = 1000g (grams) = 1000000mg (milligrams) = 1000000000 ug (micrograms)

However, micrograms are almost never used, but grams and milligrams are pretty common.

ILya
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/09/2007 at 07:40
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No. It is a plot by Senator Diane Feinstein of California to stick it up to Pierre Botox-face, the NRA guy. And the money comes from President Mahmoud Ahmandinejad of Iran, channelled via North Korea into off-shore accounts owned by Dora, NM, Chapter of the Audoughnut Society (1.6 members). The Audoughnut Society members (all 1.6 of them) deliver the funds to UoW anonimously in suitcases clearly marked and labeled with their names, SSN, mother's maiden name, and Aunt Gemina's blood sugar levels. That's because Pierre Botox-face (NRA) has a lead mine in Chile and refused to make campaign contributions to Senator Feinstein.



Edited by cyborg - August/29/2008 at 01:28
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/09/2007 at 14:17
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 Cheaptrick is quite perspicacious.  I think the Root of what he was trying to say is that the all-copper Barnes bullets are frequently and erroneously cited as being a viable prairie dog bullet, when in fact a bullet design with a Slim, highly frangible jacket is more effective on the little critters.  Those of us who've spend a lot of time exploding prairie poodles have found bullet designs like the Nosler Ballistic Tip Varmint, Speer TNT, Sierra Blitzking, Berger MEF, Hornady V-Max & SP, etc. do a much better job of kicking rodent Asp!  As for lead and the environment, I'm all for protecting the environment as much as possible, if indeed the small amount of lead in jacketed bullets really does present problems to the degree cited.  However, too often those who get up in arms about lead are hiding their real anti-gun agenda, and they are often the same busybodies who complain about the use of ATVs on public forest service roads.



Edited by cyborg - August/28/2008 at 23:16
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/09/2007 at 14:39
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I vote for the Hornaday V-Max , it my experence to works very well and it cost about half what the Corbon DPX with the Barnes bullets. Looking at the two cartrages in my pistol the Hornady 240 gr. xtp/mag looks just like the Corbon with the Barnes excedpt the cuts in the bullet appear to be deeper and cleaner cut. My point the Barnes are good but just don`t seem to justify the price.

 

Duce 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/09/2007 at 16:08
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Let loose the hounds!!!!!!!

Talley Ho!!!!

 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/09/2007 at 16:42
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Larryeee....Come out to playeeee....Larryeee....come out to playeeeee!

 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/09/2007 at 16:45
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Hey, CT, based on your new avatar and the use of the term "Talley Ho," are you a former fighter pilot?  If so, what bird did you fly?

 

The reference to combat pilots reminds me of the many stories my neighbor (Larry Asproot, call sign "Slim") used to tell me about his 3 tours flying Thuds over the Red River and the buddies "on the wall" he lost "over there."

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