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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/06/2010 at 08:29
Bboy623 View Drop Down
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Continuing my education in reloading, what do I need to know about powders? I know that there are "FF" and "FFF"...but I don't know what they stand for or what powder you use in what cartridge. Do you use different powder for say .45ACP than .223? I would imagine it would have to do with the burn rate. Any info is appreciated---Bboy623
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/06/2010 at 08:42
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Get yourself a reloading manual or start looking on the web for reloading information. The powders they list for each cartridge usually is the ones that are best suited for the case capacity and velocities for that cartridge. But to answer your question, yes you use different powders for those 2 cartridges.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/06/2010 at 08:45
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/06/2010 at 08:52
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Thanks 308 Sav..I'll give it a look--Bboy623

Edited by Bboy623 - September/06/2010 at 08:52
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/06/2010 at 09:03
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http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp is a good example of a place to start. You will see a variety of powders that work well for the cartridge you select and the bullet weight. In general, for any given cartridge, faster powders are for lighter bullets and slower for heavier bullets. But I'd advise searching for things like ".223 loads" online. See what people are using. Start well below (5-10%) of whatever someone else says is a good load for them but if you see, for example, that Varget is used by a large number of .308 shooters, as is IMR 4064, Reloder 15, etc. it gives you a good idea of what's popular.

Sometimes a particular powder has characteristics that make it more desireable even if it isn't the most accurate powder. I have gotten the best accuracy out of one of my .308s with Reloder 15, but it is more temperature-sensitive than Varget and fouls the barrel sooner. Varget's flaw is that it varies from lot to lot. But not enough to matter to most shooters. I've found it shoots well from -10F to 95F (never have been out when it was colder or hotter).
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/06/2010 at 13:21
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Originally posted by Bboy623 Bboy623 wrote:

Continuing my education in reloading, what do I need to know about powders? I know that there are "FF" and "FFF"...but I don't know what they stand for or what powder you use in what cartridge. Do you use different powder for say .45ACP than .223? I would imagine it would have to do with the burn rate. Any info is appreciated---Bboy623
 
The ratings you mention, "FF and FFF" are for black powder cartridges and muzzlerloaders. The "F" ratings classify how fine the powder is. DO NOT USE that stuff in any of the rounds you have mentioned.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/06/2010 at 20:31
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Originally posted by Roy Finn Roy Finn wrote:

Originally posted by Bboy623 Bboy623 wrote:

Continuing my education in reloading, what do I need to know about powders? I know that there are "FF" and "FFF"...but I don't know what they stand for or what powder you use in what cartridge. Do you use different powder for say .45ACP than .223? I would imagine it would have to do with the burn rate. Any info is appreciated---Bboy623
 
The ratings you mention, "FF and FFF" are for black powder cartridges and muzzlerloaders. The "F" ratings classify how fine the powder is. DO NOT USE that stuff in any of the rounds you have mentioned.

Shockedum ok now im scared that this guy will kill himself and his family and neighbors.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/06/2010 at 20:35
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Not if he does the smart thing and actually first buys a reload manual and actually reads up on it before he loads. They are very picky about pointing out the dangers of reloading.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/06/2010 at 20:41
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Originally posted by 308 Sav 308 Sav wrote:

Not if he does the smart thing and actually first buys a reload manual and actually reads up on it before he loads. They are very picky about pointing out the dangers of reloading.

reallyRoll Eyes
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/06/2010 at 20:45
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Originally posted by pyro6999 pyro6999 wrote:

Originally posted by 308 Sav 308 Sav wrote:

Not if he does the smart thing and actually first buys a reload manual and actually reads up on it before he loads. They are very picky about pointing out the dangers of reloading.

reallyRoll Eyes
Wink
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/10/2010 at 08:04
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Bboy get lots of info before you start reloading & hurt yourself or someone else.Find someone to help you or go to a store that sells reloading equiptment & let them teach you the basics before you begin.
 
Another option is to get a DVD from a co like Sierra on the correct way to reload.Remember the eye's & fingers you save may be your own.........
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/10/2010 at 08:35
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Different powders have different burn rates. Mgnum rifles generally have slower burning powders. Then thereare ball powders and extruded powders etc. Ball powders are harder to ignite, and in many cases even if not using the powder in a magnum cartridge ball powders require magnum primers. Thats what a lot of people use when using H414. Read that on reloadersbench forum I think. The heavier the bullet the slower the powder burn rate you want as well. I dont know as much about reloading pistol calibers though I imagin they use more of the fast burn powders.  This is from my limited knowledge on the subject. I am just getting started myself.



Edited by saitotiktmdog - September/10/2010 at 14:42
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/10/2010 at 14:06
338LAPUASLAP View Drop Down
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This post is not funny...

Someone is going to get hurt possibly more than just the one reloading or shooting the reloads...
 
Reloading is very very very very dangerous if not properly done...
 
It has a lot more to do with burn rates...
 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/10/2010 at 14:45
saitotiktmdog View Drop Down
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Originally posted by 338LAPUASLAP 338LAPUASLAP wrote:

This post is not funny...

Someone is going to get hurt possibly more than just the one reloading or shooting the reloads...
 
Reloading is very very very very dangerous if not properly done...
 
It has a lot more to do with burn rates...
 
I have to agree. One of my friends recently told me that the gun club at his school was disbanded because the students were reloading their ammo too hot and in one case the bolt actually sheared and came out of the gun and hit the kid in the face.   Definitely not funny.

Edited by saitotiktmdog - September/10/2010 at 14:46
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/10/2010 at 16:11
jonoMT View Drop Down
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Did I miss something? Seems like all the info posted mentioned safety in some way or another. But it can't be said often enough. One more thing to add: I always wear polycarbonate eye protection when shooting...and that's with loads that have never shown any signs of over-pressure.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/11/2010 at 07:09
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they are burning indexs, not really rates, a rate is something per unit of time, problems will occur no matter how many books you have, or loads you make,(over a 1,000,000 rds here) shooting/safety glasses are the best insurance you can get. If something doesn't go wrong you don't reload very much.
Just a few of few -- both of these problems were caused by the advantage of multiple head replacement heads and too many powder dispensers in reloading bench at one time.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/11/2010 at 09:43
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how ugly was that to hold on to dale?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/11/2010 at 09:50
jonoMT View Drop Down
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Wow. I'm glad I keep it simple. I rarely reload for my Garand and otherwise load the same powder, same weight, same bullet, same primer, same brand of brass* for two .308s. All on a single-stage press and one powder measure - and both to the same seating depth. Still, after not touching the seating die for a couple months, I found it was 1/8 turn loose in the press. Probably nothing more than bad run-out would have occurred, yet it pays to double-check everything.

My balance scale sits on a rock-solid platform that is as level as I could make it. But I take it down to zero before every loading session and carefully add the powder weight back on. I always check that twice to make sure it really is back to where it should be.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/11/2010 at 10:13
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Hope your taking notes Bboy,lots of good SAFTEY info here.I also thank you,it's when I forget the basics that I will get into trouble!
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/11/2010 at 10:42
308 Sav View Drop Down
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Here is my big advice. Get a good manual, book, video, whatever, and learn how to reload. Keep it simple. Start slow and double check yourself all the time.

Do not get hung up on it needs to be faster and hit harder. I am lucky my rifle shoots best well under max loads. This gives me plenty of room for error. There are so many variables that can increase your pressures that staying below max is a good thing.

Looking at your other posts on here, I feel you are wanting to get into reloading and are asking questions off the top of your head before doing any research. That is why there have been some questions that have drawn so much attention.

Just remember learn as much about reloading and the dangers involved in it before you ever start. Follow all safety precautions every time. Never get so confident that you do not double check yourself. Reloading can be a wonderful thing. Good luck in your research.

Remember, the only dumb question is one unasked.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/18/2010 at 03:02
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SmileRead manuals (carefully) then ask questions (like Sierra 800 number), then use common sense, then carefully start with the suggested minimum loads, do not experiment, start with say common cartridges like .223, .22-250, .243, 25-06, .270, .30-06, use components common to the round you are working with like H335 powder with 50-55 grain bullets is common with the .223, R19-22, H4831 is common to the 25-06 and .270 with 100, 120, 130 grain bullets. Use the right amount of powder as specified in the manual (not to little or too much). Reloading accidents can be caused by many causes -- inspect your work frequently through each stage (like using a flash light to peer down each charged case to see if nothing is wrong). This is not rocket science but the rewards are great.
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