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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/13/2012 at 14:13
rtrg View Drop Down
Optics GrassHopper
Optics GrassHopper


Joined: April/13/2012
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I am looking for an inexpensive binocs with a combination of CLOSE FOCUS AND WIDE ANGLE. These specs need to be 8 FEET (1.5 to 2 meters), and 9.5 to 11 degrees or more. The shorther the focal length and the wider the angle the better. Zoom would be a nice addition but not absolutely needed. Quality is not important, nor is a high magnification. A 7x35 with these specs will probably work. Center wheel focusing is a must. Names. models, specs, and prices needed. How is CLOSE FOCUS determined? How is it stated? In what terms? It is rarely marked on the packaging. Any recommendations welcome. reeltoreelguy@gmail.com.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/13/2012 at 17:08
Klamath View Drop Down
Optics Master
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Originally posted by rtrg rtrg wrote:

I am looking for an inexpensive binocs with a combination of CLOSE FOCUS AND WIDE ANGLE. These specs need to be 8 FEET (1.5 to 2 meters), and 9.5 to 11 degrees or more. The shorther the focal length and the wider the angle the better. Zoom would be a nice addition but not absolutely needed. Quality is not important, nor is a high magnification. A 7x35 with these specs will probably work. Center wheel focusing is a must. Names. models, specs, and prices needed. How is CLOSE FOCUS determined? How is it stated? In what terms? It is rarely marked on the packaging. Any recommendations welcome. reeltoreelguy@gmail.com.
Good luck.  That is kind of an oxymoron as it may not exist, especially with the angles you list.  First we kind of need your definition of inexpensive for one thing.  What do you expect from wide angle?  Industry standards typically define wide angle as a minimum of 60* apparent field of view.  This is most simply done by taking the angular fov in degrees and multiplying it by the magnification.  The angular fov is not always given, but you can get it by dividing the total listed foeld of view (listed as x many feet at 1,000 yards) and divide by 52.5, which is the feet per degree/1,000 yards.  SO if a 10x binocular is listed as having a 315' fov (pretty common) that gives an angular fov of 6*.  Multiply by the 10x magnification and the afov is 60*, or typically considered wide angle.
 
Your listed specs are Ultra Wide angle and probably can be found only in older UWA porros, which won't focus much closer than 25 feet or so.  That is 75-85* afov and that is not made anymore.
 
Close focus distance is just about always listed in a binoculars specification sheet.  It will say the close focus distance is down to so many feet.  That differs with binoculars and with different eyes.  Roof prism binoculars will focus closer than porros.  Back the wheel all the way toward the close side of focus and see for yourself how far away it will focus an object, then measure that distance.  The closer the focus, the greater the likelihood the image will separate and the binocular may need to be used with only one eye.  The closest focusing thing there is ,is the Pentax Papillio, which will come down to 18 inches.  It is a small glass and fairly inexpensive, comes in 6.5 and 8.5x, but I'd not call it wide angle., and for sure is not in your spec range.
 
Forget zoom binoculars.  They are the most fragile and most prone to break thing there is.  They also are contra indicated in your wish for wide angle, zooms are also the narrowest views you can get, in some cases less than half of what you want.
 
The Kruger Caldera 8x42 is the closest thing that pops to mind.  It is 8.4* (438').  This is the widest fov you can get in a good modern roof prism binocular.  It figures to about 67* afov.  It will almost focus on your toes while standing up, has terrific optics and may be above your inexpensive range at $379.  But for what it is it is a bargain.
 
Now I wonder if I just fed a troll...Excellent


Edited by Klamath - April/13/2012 at 20:36
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/16/2012 at 17:10
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Optics GrassHopper
Optics GrassHopper


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I bought a pair of VIVITAR noc set, 1 4x30, 1 10x50. I had an unknown brand 7x35 that allowed me to see my 26 inch tv from across the room. Unfortunately they fogged up inside and were useless. I figured a 4x30 might be good enough. We will see. Quality is not the issue nor is long distance or magnification. I also had a CARSON 7x18 monocular that focused to 18 inches. Until it was lost. If I stand at the set from a couple of feet away the small info is clear enough to read. I am hoping the 4x30s will do the same thing. If not I will look again. With all due respect the CLOSE FOCUS number is RARELY given on most of the pairs I have looked at at least in my price range and for my use. Even a plastic kids pair would probably work. I am using these in the opposite way that most were designed for. I can even use my old video camera if it weren't so heavy! In the past I have even taken the lens assembly from an old camera to use as a monoc. Sometimes yes, sometimes no. All trial and error. Mostly error. But I keep trying.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/16/2012 at 20:11
Klamath View Drop Down
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I assume you must mean the 4x30 CS, that's the only one listed as a Vivitar product.  Oddly, enough, in what has to be a misprint  that has only a 2*, yeah only two measly degrees,  that is not as wide as a TV screen across the room.  Let us know how those work or if the Vivitar site is wrong.  Usually the websites of dealers or optics companies have a close focus distance listed in their technical specifications, but not so with Vivitar.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/17/2012 at 10:20
Bird Watcher View Drop Down
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Originally posted by rtrg rtrg wrote:

I had an unknown brand 7x35 that allowed me to see my 26 inch tv from across the room. 
I am using these in the opposite way that most were designed for.
I can even use my old video camera if it weren't so heavy!
In the past I have even taken the lens assembly from an old camera to use as a monoc.

What exactly is the purpose in all of this experimentation?

Stan
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