New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - New brass - full resize or neck only?
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Check GunBroker.com for SWFA's No Reserve and No Minimum bid firearm auctions.

New brass - full resize or neck only?

 Post Reply Post Reply   Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options Page  1 2>
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/16/2009 at 19:04
tpcollins View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: January/12/2009
Status: Offline
Points: 325

I'm just getting into reloading and have a bunch of stuff on order. I've been reading a lot of online articles and there's a bit of conflicting data - go figure.

On new brass cases it was suggested to size the neck only to get upwards of 10 cycles per case. And if the rounds are shot from the same firearm, future resizing can be limited to just the neck as well. Then my brother-in-law who's been reloading for 30 years says he lubes and does a full resize every time, trimming to length, and getting only a couple rounds per each case. He gave me a reloading book to read that's also 30 years old and he probably has never been on an internet forum.

Is the best procedure to fully resize and trim every case? Seems like if you start trimming case and removing brass, something's getting pretty thin somewhere - probably why he throws them away after 2 rounds. The article I read about sizing the neck only says you can get 10 pounds per cases this way. Any help in pointing me to the correct direction would be appreciated. Thanks.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/16/2009 at 19:12
rifle looney View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: November/21/2008
Status: Offline
Points: 2553
Full length sizing you should get up to 12/20 reloads and will be more reliable cycling.. neck sizing should only be used if you only shoot this ammo in your own gun! and you can see a prolonged case life..I would full size always.

PS....get new reloading manuals?


Edited by rifle looney - February/16/2009 at 19:13
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/16/2009 at 19:14
Roy Finn View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar
Steiner Junkie

Joined: April/05/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 4856
On brand new virgin brass, I fully resize on the first loading and for my rifles, I neck size from then on. Not sure why your brother in law is only getting two cycles on brass. Depending on the chambering and how hot you are loading, trimming shouldn't be necessary all that often. What I do on new brass, is to trim back about 5 thousands. Trimming also squares up the neck on virgin brass and once that is done you are good to go.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/16/2009 at 19:24
Steelbenz View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar
ROLL TIDE ROLL

Joined: January/03/2006
Location: Heart of Dixie
Status: Offline
Points: 4899
New brass needs to be full length resized!!! I don't care who makes it. I just did some Lapua new brass in .308.  Brass is excellent, but I still ran them though a FL die and checked, trimmed and cleaned the inside of the neck to prep for loading.  The brass now will be only neck sized and trimmed when needed due to shooting this ammo ONLY out of MY bolt gun.
If your shooting this stuff out of an Auto loader like an AR you will have to Full length resize ever time.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/16/2009 at 19:44
ckk1106 View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: December/14/2007
Location: Arizona
Status: Offline
Points: 1435
I've just neck size new brass.  I've never had a problem doing that.  The mouths of the new brass that I get always are dented somewhat.  I used to just run the expander ball through the neck to straighten out the mouths of the cases and not even neck size.  I never had a problem there either.  I FL resize everything after it's been shot, though.  I've tried neck sizing a few and some I've had difficulty chambering the round even though it was shot in the same gun.  I'm somewhat new to this reloading thing as well.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/16/2009 at 20:00
sakomato View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: February/28/2008
Location: Houston
Status: Offline
Points: 1084
tpcollins, one of the problems is that there is no set of definitions for the types of reloading, at least that I have seen.  So someone may say they are Full Length Resizing (FLR) when in fact they may be Neck Sizing (NS).  After several years and different forums the most common understanding of the different types of reloading are:
 
Neck Sizing (NS) - sizing all or part of the neck without sizing the shoulder or case body
 
Partial Full Length Resizing (PFLR) - sizing all the neck and all of the case body and leaving a slight contact at the shoulder
 
Full Length Resizing (FLR) - sizing all the neck and all the case body and pushing the shoulder back to where there is no contact at the shoulder
 
New cases are substantially smaller than most chambers and the shoulder has a long way to go to expand to fit the chamber.  I could give many example but let's just take a typical one, a factory 30-06.  These are measurements taken with a Hornady Headspace Gauge http://www.competitor.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=479704 which take a measurement from the case head to the datum point on the shoulder
 
New case shoulder position - 2.040"
Once fired shoulder position - 2.0485"
 
Now the brass has so much springback when it is new that a once fired case is still not tight in the chamber.  If you neck size you can get additional loadings while the brass is growing work hardened so that it will not springback enough, then it will become hard to chamber.  So neck sized you will get the following measurements
 
Twice fired shoulder position - 2.050"
Three times fired shoulder position - 2.0510" (slight crush fit)
Four times fired shoulder position - 2.0515" (crush fit)
 
When you get a crush fit then it is time to push the shoulder back.  You can then push it back far enough so there is no contact at the shoulder and that would be FLR, or you can push the shoulder back a minimal amount, say .001" or so, so that there is a slight contact at the shoulder and that would be PFLR.
 
On the smaller calibers it is possible to neck size forever since the leverage you have when closing the bolt just overpowers that small case, but on the larger calibers it can be very hard to close the bolt on a several times fired and only neck sized case.
 
So when you talk about a new case where the shoulder is set back from .005" to as much as .030" on belted magnums and the case body is also much smaller than chamber or die size, then you can set your die to FLR but your die will not do anything except contact the neck.  So to say you FLR new cases is not true, you would accomplish the same thing by taking a neck sizing die and truing up the necks with that.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/16/2009 at 21:32
tpcollins View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: January/12/2009
Status: Offline
Points: 325
Now that's what I call an answer - too bad the link didn't work.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/16/2009 at 22:32
sakomato View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: February/28/2008
Location: Houston
Status: Offline
Points: 1084
Yeah, I forgot about that competitor thing here.  Anyway it is a link to M-I-D-W-A-Y for reloading equipment (not really something they sell here).  It is a red holder that attaches to your caliper and has a collet that your case fits into that hits on the shoulder shown here taking a reading on a new case
 
 
and a once fired case
 
 
Anyway, you have the most control over your case dimensions when you have reached the PFLR stage and can set your neck size, shoulder dimension and case dimension to the exact same size everytime with PFLR.  If you are neck sizing for the first few loadings then your shoulder is in flux and expanding a little more each time and if you are FLR then you have are not holding the case in stasis against your chamber, which will subject you more to the effects of runout.  When you are repeatedly PFLR'ing your case then you are containing case movement by binding it in the chamber between your bolt face and chamber shoulder and you are doing it exactly the same way everytime.
 
Consistancy is one of the most important factors in accuracy.
 


Edited by sakomato - February/16/2009 at 22:43
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/17/2009 at 02:20
Longhunter View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman
Avatar

Joined: February/02/2006
Status: Offline
Points: 421
"... a couple of rounds for each case..." is a pretty serious indication that he is doing something wrong.
 
I use the Lee Collet dies for reloading.  They've worked just fine with both new and used cases when fired from only one rifle.  And yes, you can expect a shorter case life from a large magnum with full-house loads than from a regular .30-06.
 
 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/17/2009 at 08:40
lucytuma View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight
Avatar

Joined: November/25/2007
Location: Wisconsin
Status: Offline
Points: 5389
I always full length size all of my brass, but I also am a hunter and don't require the precission that many target/bench shooters require.  I also have rifles of the same caliber and want to make sure that they will cycle in all of my rifles.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/17/2009 at 10:56
Sgt. D View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: February/20/2008
Location: North Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 3639
Quote    Consistancy is one of the most important factors in accuracy.
 
 
I've been loading for three yrs and still feel like a novice. That said, I offer this as testiment of where I am and for scrutiny for my learning sake. I mark my brass on the third load so I know not to use them for future accuracy rounds. I started doing that because once in a while out of the blue I would throw a round out of the group. I have a custom shooting bench that give great consistancy so when a round goes out side I know wether it was me or not. All that to say that when I started leaving those marked rounds in the box I have alot fewer throws. I'm now to the point that for the sake of consistant clover leafs or better I plan to start weighing each piece of brass before loading and picking some common standard to see if there is any noticable value. This is probably old news for some of you, but as stated I'm still learning. Now I'll kick myself in the shin, because buying the high dollar brass makes me sick I have resolved to what I like and that is Winchester brass. It is not beautiful brass but I can get consistant accuracy most of the time. Another reason I plan to check weight before loading.
 
So let the knowledge flow. Can anyone save me some time and back ache?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/17/2009 at 16:13
Longhunter View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman
Avatar

Joined: February/02/2006
Status: Offline
Points: 421
Weighng and segregating brass can certainly help accuracy. 
 
However, the quality standard for brass is a lot higher now than when I started reloading in the sixties.  Then, you could find a variance of up to 12 grains in the weight of .30-06 brass when comparing different boxes of ammo from the same manufacturer.
 
The latest brass I've purchased has usually varied no more than a couple of grains.
 
 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/17/2009 at 19:37
sakomato View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: February/28/2008
Location: Houston
Status: Offline
Points: 1084
If you FLR all the time then you are much more subject to case head separations
 
 
When the firing pin slams into the back of the case it pushes the case forward till the case shoulder stops on the chamber shoulder (except belted magnums and we'll go into that in a minute).  The pressure then expands the case body to the chamber walls where it binds, then the pressure forces the case head back to the bolt face.  The case body thins at the pressure ring which is where the case body is still thin before it becomes solid at the case head
 
 
If you PFLR or NS fired cases and headspace on the shoulder it mitigates the thinning because the brass is in stasis with the case head against the bolt face since it can not be moved forward by the firing pin.  If you repeatedly create headspace by FLR then you are repeatedly thinning the case at the pressure ring and greatly increasing your chances of a case head separation and you are reducing your potential case life.  Also sizing more than absolutely necessary is working your case and will increase work hardening of your brass.
 
Sgt. D, do you anneal or check for runout?  Single flyers can be because of inconsistant bullet grip which annealing will help.  Also inconsistant seating depth will lead to a flyer and the easiest way to get inconsistant seating depth is because of different seating force needed to seat the bullet.  A seating depth change of as little as .003" can make a difference in POI especially if you are seating close to the lands.
 
I forgot about belted magnums.  The belt actually defines the headspace on belted magnums because the forward movement of the case in the chamber is stopped by the belt.  I have measured the forward movement permitted by the belt a couple of times (it is involved and more difficult than measuring gap at the shoulder) and even though there may be .020" to .030" gap at the shoulder on new cases, the belt only allows the case to move forward between .003" to .007" (on the 2 I measured).  So the forward movement is stopped by the belt and the pressure still pushes the shoulder forward to contact at the shoulder before the case body expands to grip the walls.  Then the thinning at the pressure ring happens anyway.


Edited by sakomato - February/17/2009 at 19:44
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/18/2009 at 18:41
Sgt. D View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: February/20/2008
Location: North Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 3639
Quote
Sgt. D, do you anneal or check for runout?  Single flyers can be because of inconsistant bullet grip which annealing will help.  Also inconsistant seating depth will lead to a flyer and the easiest way to get inconsistant seating depth is because of different seating force needed to seat the bullet.  A seating depth change of as little as .003" can make a difference in POI especially if you are seating close to the lands.
Quote
 
No I haven't been because early on I was checking for runout (if runout means case strecth/thinning) and other variables that my mentor suggested I look for. After a number of checks, that was one of the factors that made me start marking the 3rd load. However I was not looking for excessive runout. Because in my limited experience I considered deburring a remedy. When loading the 4th and 5th time I run them thru the trim for good measure. I do not load more that 5 times. I am very particular about seating depth and I neck size new brass because I expect the first load to be premium. What indicator would I have of varying seating force if any? If OCL is consistant isn't that the final indicator?
I do seat just off the lands.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/18/2009 at 20:03
sakomato View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: February/28/2008
Location: Houston
Status: Offline
Points: 1084
Hey Sgt D, no, runout is the amount the case or bullet on a loaded round is out of round from the true axis of the case.  It is measured with a concentricity gauge such as the RCBS Casemaster
 
 
or the Sinclair version
 
 
there are other versions like NECO and Hornady is coming out with a new one this year where you can actually measure concentricity (runout) and fix it right there sorta like I do with my Bersin tool
 
 
If you have decent runout on your loaded cases in the <.003" range and you then have one that runs out to .008" or .010" then you will have a flyer.
 
Yes OCL or OAL is the final indicator but distance to the lands and seating depth is much more indicative of variances if measured on the ogive with a comparator, not on the bullet tip.  Next time you are seating and you seat one that seems to have greater resistance compare the seating depth and see if it changed.  If I feel the resistance I will check and usually the depth has backed out a few thousandths.  If one slides in a little easier then it will be seated a few thousandths deeper.
 
A few thousandths is not as critical if you are seating .020" off the lands or more.  The farther away the less critical complete 100% consistant seating depth becomes.  If you are trying to seat .005" off then you need to be 100%.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/18/2009 at 20:50
John Barsness View Drop Down
Optics Optimist
Optics Optimist


Joined: January/27/2009
Status: Offline
Points: 785

It depends on what you are loading for. If it's a big rifle, there's usual no reason to full-length size new brass, even in a very accurate varmint rifle. In fact, with standard dies you may just pull the neck out of alignment with the body of the case, which means the seated bullet will almost surely be out of alignment.

New brass has the same dimensions as the brass in factory ammo. It will fit a little more losely in the chamber than fired and properly resized brass, but not much. In addition, ythe forming of new brass leaves the necks in very good alignment with the case body. The neck mouth may be out of round, due to bouncing around against other cases, but the basic alignment will be good.

This is why I normally just run new brass necks over the expander ball, instead of running them all the way into the die, whether a neck-sizing die or full-length die. This normally leaves them in much better alignment with the case body than running them all the way into a FL die.
 
How to size cases after the first firing is another question, and depends on the intended use (big game, varmints, targets, etc.)
 
Getting only two firings out of brass means something is seriously wrong. It casn be any number of things, including over-resizing or too-hot loads or not knowing how to set up the die properly. But even without annealing any centerfire rifle case should last at least 5 firings without problems.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/24/2009 at 10:55
jonoMT View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: November/13/2008
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 4612
First of all, sakomoto has some really good advice in this posting (not the only one, but my experience jibes with his). I use the Hornady comparator as well and PFLR, but only after the first firing for my .308. I just don't think it's necessary with brand new Lapua brass and haven't noticed much difference in accuracy. The nice thing using the comparator is that you can keep your resizing to the minimum and avoid working the brass.

Things are totally different for my M1 rifle. That requires FL resizing every time. However, at this time I just save the brass for down the road and rarely reload it. I stocked up on HXP .30-06 from CMP and just can't reload for .25/rd. Nor is it worth it to me. I have a great barrel on that rifle but it will never be sub-MOA.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/24/2009 at 16:30
Sgt. D View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: February/20/2008
Location: North Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 3639
Originally posted by sakomato sakomato wrote:

Hey Sgt D, no, runout is the amount the case or bullet on a loaded round is out of round from the true axis of the case.  It is measured with a concentricity gauge such as the RCBS Casemaster
 
 
or the Sinclair version
 
If you have decent runout on your loaded cases in the <.003" range and you then have one that runs out to .008" or .010" then you will have a flyer.
 
 
 
I find this alarming! If a fired case is out of round, doesn't that suggest that the chamber is causing it? I had always expected that a fired round would to some point become custom fit to the chamber. I was thinking that the sizing die was primarily for correcting neck deformation and brass nearing the end of its usefulness. If the chamber is a presicion bore how can this happen?
 
John added this, and makes me wonder now how far I am from where I want to be.
 
"How to size cases after the first firing is another question, and depends on the intended use" (big game, varmints, targets, etc.)
 
If you load for targets, wouldn't that cover all bases?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/24/2009 at 16:35
supertool73 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Master
Optics Jedi Master
Avatar
Superstool

Joined: January/03/2008
Location: Utah
Status: Offline
Points: 9509
I recently watch a video called "High power rifle reloading with David Tubbs"  IT was fantastic.  He goes through every step of making precision ammo and uses many different tools and explains the pros and cons of them all.  He spends a lot of time talking about these concentricity gauges and explains how brass curves and how to correct it. 

I would recommend it for anyone who wants to learn a few tricks.  http://gunvideo.com/pgroup_descrip/114/5519/
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/24/2009 at 19:55
Dave Wilson View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice


Joined: January/29/2009
Status: Offline
Points: 88
[QUOTE=John Barsness]
This is why I normally just run new brass necks over the expander ball, instead of running them all the way into the die, whether a neck-sizing die or full-length die. This normally leaves them in much better alignment with the case body than running them all the way into a FL die.
 
i don't know how to address this statement other than to say it is very incorrect. the expander ball is by far and away the worst culpurt for making ammo that's not straight. just running over the neck and not completely into the die would be the best way to make the necks crooked with the case body. personnally, i remove the expanders from my dies. you will make much straighter ammo. use an expander made for making the necks round, and then run them through a full length die. set the die so it only bumps the shoulder about .001 or so you can just feel a little resistance at the end of bolt travel when closing. now you have sized brass that will sit straight in the chamber but not be tight when closing the bolt.
 
someone mentioned weight sorting brass. it is a waste of time. it will do nothing to improve accuracy. it's a feel good thing.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/24/2009 at 20:15
sakomato View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: February/28/2008
Location: Houston
Status: Offline
Points: 1084
Originally posted by Sgt. D Sgt. D wrote:

 
 
I find this alarming! If a fired case is out of round, doesn't that suggest that the chamber is causing it? I had always expected that a fired round would to some point become custom fit to the chamber. I was thinking that the sizing die was primarily for correcting neck deformation and brass nearing the end of its usefulness. If the chamber is a presicion bore how can this happen?
 
 
Hey Sgt D, the fired case will not be out of round or have runout (chambers are almost always concentric or close to it).  When you fire the case the brass will iron itself to the chamber walls and will be very concentric on the outside.  Any variances in neck thickness will migrate to the inside of the neck.  Where it becomes out of round with runout is when you start resizing it.
 
Like Dave Wilson said, the expander ball is usually the culprit and it will jerk the shoulder and neck around.  If you size with the expander then that will size the inside of the neck brass and push variances in neck thickness back to the outside of the neck which will show up as runout but is really not.  If you size without the expander in a FL die then you would need to neck turn so as not to get too heavy a bullet grip but that would reduce runout since most dies are also very concentric.
 
If you use a Lee Collet then you will have less runout because the Lee Collet has a floating mandrel which will center before the collet is squeezed onto the neck.
 
With a bushing type neck sizer most of us remove the expander ball because you might as well be using a FL die if you use a bushing die with an expander.  Without the expander you can buy a bushing to fit the size you want on the outside of the neck.  But again, you need to turn to get the best results because the bushing will size the outside of the neck and push all the neck thickness variations to the inside, that will lead to good runout on the case neck before seating the bullet, but bad runout after seating the bullet since the bullet will push the inconsistencies back to the outside and push the bullet one way or the other.
 
Lot to think about.  Best course is to use a Lee Collet Neck Sizer and Redding Body Die and you have solved 95% of runout problems without a lot of hassle.


Edited by sakomato - February/24/2009 at 20:16
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/25/2009 at 09:44
supertool73 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Master
Optics Jedi Master
Avatar
Superstool

Joined: January/03/2008
Location: Utah
Status: Offline
Points: 9509
Originally posted by sakomato sakomato wrote:

 
Hey Sgt D, the fired case will not be out of round or have runout (chambers are almost always concentric or close to it).  When you fire the case the brass will iron itself to the chamber walls and will be very concentric on the outside.  Any variances in neck thickness will migrate to the inside of the neck.  Where it becomes out of round with runout is when you start resizing it.


Hope I can explain what I saw on the vid with this.

David tubbs said that based on the brass that the entire case can in fact become unstraight in a chamber upon firing and will stay that way. 
He said what causes this is if the case walls are not even from side to side or at lease very close that the thinner side will stretch and it will bend like a banana. (obciously not that much but that was just the example that he used)  He said it is more likely in a action like a Rem 700 because there are only the two locking lugs for it to push against when firing.  If you put the thin side so it is not pushing on the lug but so it is in position in front of nothing that the brass will actually stretch that way.  That is one reason why a lot of bench rest shooters put their brass in the exact same way every time, so they can line up the weak and strong side perfectly with the lugs on the bolt. 

He use a guage to measure the case walls of his brass and throws out anything that was over .003 variance from side to side.  He said using an action with more than two locking lugs definitely helps this problem.  But for extreme accuracy and consistancy we just need to be checking the case all thickness often and throw out the brass that is much out of spec. 

Obviously this is for the most extreme accuracy obtainable and will not apply to most of us, just thought it was some very interesting info.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/02/2009 at 08:59
cheaptrick View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar

Joined: September/27/2004
Location: South Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 20468
Originally posted by Roy Finn Roy Finn wrote:

On brand new virgin brass, I fully resize on the first loading and for my rifles, I neck size from then on. Not sure why your brother in law is only getting two cycles on brass. Depending on the chambering and how hot you are loading, trimming shouldn't be necessary all that often. What I do on new brass, is to trim back about 5 thousands. Trimming also squares up the neck on virgin brass and once that is done you are good to go.
 
What Roy said.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/02/2009 at 12:18
Sgt. D View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: February/20/2008
Location: North Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 3639
So when I am sizing the neck on new brass or pushing primers and sizing fired brass the resistance I am getting on the return stroke is "possibly" causing runout. Or maybe even pulling the neck and shoulder out of place. This is getting frustrating. I had wondered why the pull stroke was smooth and had almost no resistance, but the return is usually tight at the end. Is there an adjustment to reduce this or do I need different dies? I am using RCBS now.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: March/02/2009 at 12:35
supertool73 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Master
Optics Jedi Master
Avatar
Superstool

Joined: January/03/2008
Location: Utah
Status: Offline
Points: 9509
David Tubb recommends taking the expander ball that goes inside the case and sanding it down a little smaller.  That is what he did in the video.  He says they are to big to start with and will pull to much and cause run out.  He chucked the whole expander ball assembly in a drill and used sand paper and emery cloth to make it smaller.
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  1 2>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Similar Threads: "New brass - full resize or neck only?"
Subject Author Forum Replies Last Post
Resizing .284 Win. brass to 6.5x284 ceylonc Reloading & Ballistics 3 4/6/2007 10:25:51 PM
Neck turning and FL resizing Gil P. Reloading & Ballistics 2
Neck sizing or full lenght ??? shooter4 Reloading & Ballistics 52
Lee new brass trimmer B W M Reloading & Ballistics 6
Reloading new unfired brass little cleo Reloading & Ballistics 16
defective new brass pyro6999 Reloading & Ballistics 17 3/26/2007 9:22:08 PM
Resizing cpwomack Reloading & Ballistics 10
New member new scope questions P&Y Rifle Scopes 9
Gang of Five-members only Roy Finn Firearms 14 3/9/2007 6:41:31 PM
Only Thing Left to do on AR15 is Bipod macky Rifle Scopes 11 5/17/2006 3:29:56 PM


This page was generated in 0.828 seconds.