New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Low light Binoculars
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Check GunBroker.com for SWFA's No Reserve and No Minimum bid firearm auctions.

Low light Binoculars

 Post Reply Post Reply   Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/24/2016 at 11:01
bhaven View Drop Down
Optics GrassHopper
Optics GrassHopper
Avatar

Joined: December/08/2005
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 17
Looking for opinions on these two. Which one would be the best low light.
1) Meopta B1 8x56
2) Steiner Nighthunter xp 8x56

They are both in the same price range.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/25/2016 at 14:11
tahqua View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar
Have You Driven A Ford Lately?

Joined: March/27/2006
Location: Michigan, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 8182
I don't have the particular models in question. I do use both Steiner Military and Marine and Meopta B1 binoculars a lot. They both do a very good job.
The nice thing about an 8x56 in quality glass like Steiner and Meopta is they have 7mm of exit pupil and are very forgiving of eye position behind them.
Can you get a look through both to compare?

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/26/2016 at 18:25
bhaven View Drop Down
Optics GrassHopper
Optics GrassHopper
Avatar

Joined: December/08/2005
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 17
It will not be easy locally.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/13/2016 at 13:22
Bird Watcher View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: August/30/2006
Status: Offline
Points: 1522
Originally posted by bhaven bhaven wrote:

It will not be easy locally.


You can always order both from SWFA and return the one that you like the least. Wink
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/13/2016 at 15:14
WJC View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: May/28/2014
Location: Twin Falls, ID
Status: Offline
Points: 138
56mm is 56mm and the differences in transmission some people SAY they can see the in coatings of one good manufacturer over another is a pipe dream because the difference—owing to coatings alone—is below the observer's threshold of recognition. And, while I'm shot down a lot for saying so, I stand by the comment. It's like the fellow who says his binocular is "perfectly aligned" when the collimator shows it to be severely misaligned.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/13/2016 at 18:18
Bird Watcher View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: August/30/2006
Status: Offline
Points: 1522
Originally posted by WJC WJC wrote:

56mm is 56mm and the differences in transmission some people SAY they can see the in coatings of one good manufacturer over another is a pipe dream because the difference—owing to coatings alone—is below the observer's threshold of recognition.


Here's some good reading from www.cloudynights.com

We see this question all the time. "They look exactly the same on the outside. Why would anyone pay more if you can get the same thing for less"? Usually, it's because they are much different on the inside.

One of the things we've been trying to teach people for years is there are a list of some of the differences you CAN'T see. Some are highlighted here:

Contrary to what you might read elsewhere, any shortcuts that can be allowed in the manufacturing process will result in a less expensive product that can be distrubuted for lower cost. Considerable savings in time and process results in a less expensive product, a much bigger savings than a few $$, but one that will not perform as well.

Probably the most important differences in any two binoculars that look the same but sell for much different prices is (A)the mechanical construction, workings and range of adjustment, and (B)(likely more important) the degree to which all the optical surfaces have been figured, polished and coated. There are other things that make a difference in the quality and most of them are not visible on the outside.

If one dealer orders all his binoculars without coated prisms, the manufacturer can simply take the prisms off the shelf and install them directly without putting the prisms through the 3 hour process of the coating machine and then inspection.

It is not the cost of the automated polishing machine that adds to your cost, it is the cost of an individual testing and inspecting each piece of glass before it passes the level of QC demanded by the distributor.

Uncoated or single coated lenses or prisms will considerably increase the amount of light that gets reflected around the inside of the binocular, causing ghost images and reducing image contrast. A fully multi coated binocular requires multi-coating on ALL surfaces. It was discovered several years ago that that the factory claim of fully multicoated was being applied to binoculars that had some multi-coated components and some single coated components. This type of factory claim is still passed on by some importers.

You could be getting lenses that have passed a specific selection criteria for the objectives in one binocular. For another brand binocular, you could get lenses that have not passed the test for brand A, so you take your chances. For a third brand, you may be getting the lenses that did not pass any inspection criteria used to get the lenses in the first two brands noted above. You don't honestly think they throw away all the lenses that do not meet a specified test criteria, do you? Just because they don't meet the criteria for brand A or B doesn't mean they can't be used for brand C. More on this below.

The same binocular body could be fitted out with very different eyepieces and still look exactly the same. I once tested 3 different 20mm plossl eyepieces. They ranged in price from $29 to $89. With minor modifications they could all be fit into the same eyepiece housing. The difference in performance between the three was like night and day. The lowest cost 20mm eyepiece had severe distortion in the outer 40-50% of the field of view and beyond 60% out from center lost a full magnitude to the best eyepiece. The best 20mm eyepiece could still see not only the faintest stars but also very fine resolution at the extreme edge of the field stop.

Sometimes we have binoculars that appear exactly the same, but one model has a much wider field of view than the other. This can be accomplished by simply eliminating the field stop from the eyepiece housing. Of course, what you end up with is a wider fov, but it is not a sharply defined field stop and is generally mush towards the outer edges. Also, this may allow undesirable stray light to enter the fov. Neither the removal of the field stop for the wider soft field nor the stray light improves the image, but it is cheaper to make the eyepieces without the field stop.

The eyepiece lens edges could be blackened or not.
The objective lens edges could be blackened or not.

Shiny or bright metal exposed surfaces on inside of barrels will diminish contrast. Not all binoculars are fully blackened at all internal surfaces.

If a lens has several layers of MgF, then it is multicoated. If so, it may likely not have the characteristic blue color of a single MgF coated lens. A properly multicoated lens surface may reflect only 0.2% to 0.5% of the entering light. A properly single-coated lens surface may reflect only 1.5% of the light. An uncoated lens surface may reflect 4% of the light. Considering a binocular might have 12 to 18 surfaces, the importance of multicoating soon becomes evident.

Probably just as important is simply having multicaotings is the precise control of the thickness of the coating process. An improperly controlled multi-coating process can produce a lens coating that reflects more light than a single coating. Although you can't truely determine anything about the precision of the coating application by the color of the coating, in general, poorly coated lenses tend to look bright green. The bright green color could result from coatings being applied too thick. Improper coating thickness will reflect more light than it should, reduce the light transmission of the optics and if bad enough may cause internal reflections.

Lenses that fail the extremely tight tollerances required in the coating process should not be categorized as premium multicoated lenses. But they are still multi-coated lenses and will be used in the manufacture of some brand of binocular (same as objectives mentioned above that don't pass QC criteria). So you could be buying a fully multi-coated binocular that has lenses that don't meet stringent coating thickness criteria.

Here is a quote from a highly respected individual that has been associated with the optics industry. His comments below pertain also to my comments above re: QC of lenses and coatings.

EdZ said

I've worked in the optical industry a bit, so I have a fair idea what the limiting factor in the quality of binoculars made for the mass market is.

Prisms aren't particularly easy to fabricate to really high levels of quality. The "quality sieve" method may help keep costs down, but they're still not cheap to make. (The "quality sieve" method of production was described to me by a fellow who had worked with the Japanese exporter of fine optics many years ago. A fabricator would make, say 1000 prisms, lens sets, whatever. Only the ones which met the higherst standards would be shipped to the most discriminating customer, say the best 200. The next 200 would be shipped to a customer who had high standards, but not so high as the "top dog", and so on, until the glass is all gone. The prisms that make it into the "no-name" binocs you buy at K-Mart for $19.95 likely came from the "bottom 200"!)

Rick Shaffer


So there you have it. They may look exactly the same on the outside, but Oh, there are so many possiblities for differences.

edz


These Look The Same, are they?
This post summarizes a lot of the quality differences that might exist be between various brands and price levels of binoculars, most of which would never be evident by looking at the outside of the binocular.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/13/2016 at 18:58
WJC View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: May/28/2014
Location: Twin Falls, ID
Status: Offline
Points: 138
Yes, but some people never look beyond a price point. That's why we see a myriad of posts wanting to know which is better, a ZEISS_______ or a XXXXXXXXXX__________ that has been on the market for 14 whole months!

It can be easy for us to think: "Has this guy been living under a rock?" But, I was once talking about Paul McCartney with a navy buddy when another asked: "WHO'S THAT?" It happens.
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Similar Threads: "Low light Binoculars"
Subject Author Forum Replies Last Post
Geographic latitute and low light binoculars anweis Binoculars 5
Need good low light binoculars for less than $500 BigDad Binoculars 1
Low light Binoculars bhaven Binoculars 19
Binoculars vs Rifle scope--low light viewing? ceylonc Binoculars 12
Need low light, light weight rifle scope ElkMan Rifle Scopes 1 4/29/2004 3:26:17 AM
Schmidt Bender low light ? cbm Rifle Scopes 10
Low light comparrison of Swaro models R H Clark Rifle Scopes 3
Fixed vs Variable in Low Light gpshumway Rifle Scopes 30
Good low-light Hunting Scope? luke_duke Rifle Scopes 34
Low Light Scope Advice davisj3537 Rifle Scopes 24


This page was generated in 0.313 seconds.