New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Lapua bullets and Vihtavuori powder
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Check GunBroker.com for SWFA's No Reserve and No Minimum bid firearm auctions.

Lapua bullets and Vihtavuori powder

 Post Reply Post Reply   Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options Page  1 2 3>
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/16/2007 at 20:54
spreader View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice


Joined: July/31/2007
Status: Offline
Points: 77
It seems that very few people reload with Lapua bullets and Vihtavuori powder here in States, so information in languages other than Swedish and Finnish seems to be scarce.

So, I wonder, had anyone here had any experience reloading 308 Win with Lapua brass, Lapua 11gram (170grain) LockBase bullets AND Vihtavuori N550 powder?

N150 is single-base and it's all relatively simple(in terms of getting used to its behaviour/performance).

N550 is double-base and is supposedly designed to provide most consistent performance under varying environmental conditions (sort of like Hodgdon Extreme series of powders).
But interestingly enough, in 308 Win, Vihtavuori manual suggests that the accuracy load for 170 grain LockBase is the one with N150 - 45,5grain at 2734fps MV from 24" 1:12" twist barrel.

I have not tried the N550 yet, so does anyone have experience with N550 in 308 using 170gr LockBase?
What about N550 in 308 with 185grain Scenar or D46?

Thanks!

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/16/2007 at 21:51
Blackbird View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice


Joined: February/10/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 279
I use VV N540 in a 6BR, with 105-108 missles for 600 + yard shooting. I can get more fps than Varget. Lapua pills in 6 mm. are so consistant in weight, that I would venture to say the .30 cal's probably are. If you go to benchrest.com, you will probably get a lot of responses.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 05:55
cheaptrick View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar

Joined: September/27/2004
Location: South Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 20467

I have use .308 Lapua brass now as a SOP.

I load them for a Remington .308 w/ a 1 in 12 twist barrel, with either 168gr. SMK's or 155 Lapua Scenar's. Both bullets get loaded with Varget.

 

Both bullets are very accurate and will shoot sub moa.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 06:21
pyro6999 View Drop Down
Optics Retard
Optics Retard
Avatar
OT TITAN

Joined: December/22/2006
Location: North Dakota
Status: Offline
Points: 22024
im fairly certain you can still buy the vv reloading manual,i had one a few years ago and i lost it somewhere. it  wasnt much of anything it was free from the the company but it had enough info in english no less to do a lot of reloading.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 08:19
Mike McDonald View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: September/01/2004
Status: Offline
Points: 734

I've used 64 pounds each,of N150, N550, N160 and N560 powder since 2001.

 

I like the 550 series for 175 grain bullets in gas guns, the 150 series for 175 grain bullets in bolt guns, and the 160/560 series for heavy bullets in 22 cal and 30 cal in bolt rifles.

 

It's decent powder with a larger velocity swing than the Hodgdens stuff and a huge knee in the velocity curve below 50 cegrees F.  I do find the accuracy slightly better with VV powders but not enough to keep a data book with 10 degree temp swings when the H series powders offer an advantage.

 

Think of VV powders as teh EU equivilent of the IIMR series.

 

I have not had a need to invest in the Lapua bullets as yet.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 08:40
cheaptrick View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar

Joined: September/27/2004
Location: South Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 20467
Mr. Mike, what's your powder of choice for a 168gr. SMK in a .308 bolt gun?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 09:37
Mike McDonald View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: September/01/2004
Status: Offline
Points: 734

CT,

I never found a use for 168's in a 308 so I can't help on that account.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 10:03
Pooreyes-2 View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: September/02/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 79

 

    Now you all have me thinking about reloading.I have been looking for a round for my new 308. As of now I am shooting the Winchester ballistic silvertip 168gr.

   What do you all think about 150gr bullet for deer at long and short range? Or should I stay with the 168gr?

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 10:43
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight


Joined: July/04/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 5087

44 thru 45.5 grs. varget with 168s is a very popular load. around 2650

155 gr A-max work well and with 47 grs varget will get you into the 2900 fps 308 in 26 in barrels.

168's are best out to 500, and as load that will work well across a series of guns, (make one load that works well for 5-6 308's) it is good to standardize.

if you are limited to 308 past 600 yds, something in the 155,175 gr is the most popular.

LIke ballistic coefficients, most of the accuracy and velocity results are done with rifles having little resemblence to reality guns, and all figures should be taken with a grain of salt, and verified in the particularities of your gun.



Edited by Dale Clifford
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 10:52
Pooreyes-2 View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: September/02/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 79

 

 

    Thanks for the info Dale.

 Also I am sorry I high jacked this thread. Dale the 155 a-max is the Hornady bullet? I am looking at them now and a reloader. What do you think about this reloader

 

< =https://www.hornady.com/shop/ method=get>< = value=928b4b463d43fb1d0cce725cdbda8451 name=ps_session> < = value=shop/cart name=page> < = value=cartAdd name=func> < = value=1 name=quantity> < = value=499 name=product_id>
LOCK-N-LOAD AP NSP
Item No.
Price
< =image height=30 alt="Add to Cart" width=70 src="https://www.hornady.com/shop/shop_image/ad2cart.gif">
095100
$437.19
< =https://www.hornady.com/shop/ method=get>< = value=928b4b463d43fb1d0cce725cdbda8451 name=ps_session> < = value=shop/cart name=page> < = value=cartAdd name=func> < = value=1 name=quantity> < = value=1458 name=product_id>
LOCK-N-LOAD AP DUST COVER
Item No.
Price
< =image height=30 alt="Add to Cart" width=70 src="https://www.hornady.com/shop/shop_image/ad2cart.gif">
095200
$21.95
< =https://www.hornady.com/shop/ method=get>< = value=928b4b463d43fb1d0cce725cdbda8451 name=ps_session> < = value=shop/cart name=page> < = value=cartAdd name=func> < = value=1 name=quantity> < = value=1459 name=product_id>
LOCK-N-LOAD AP W/CASE FEEDER DUST COVER
Item No.
Price
< =image height=30 alt="Add to Cart" width=70 src="https://www.hornady.com/shop/shop_image/ad2cart.gif">
095203
$24.99

An automatic, five-station press, Hornady’s Lock-N-Load AP™ lets us switch dies, powder dies, check dies, bullet seaters or crimp dies without changing the whole die head. Change one die or all with one quick twist. The Lock-N-Load AP comes complete with everything listed here, as well as extra bushings.

FEATURES INCLUDE:

LOCK-N-LOAD POWDER MEASURE
The only system that uses a full size powder measure that can be reset to another charge or powder with the push of a button. The unique inserts can be preset to the charge you use with the caliber you are loading. The most flexible (and economical) powder system available for progressive presses.

PRIMING SYSTEM
The primer slide in the shell carrier receives a primer at the top of the stroke and inserts in the case at the bottom of the stroke. The slide stays in perfect alignment, and is easily changed from large to small. Use the included primer pick-up tubes (large and small) to fill the primer tube.

LOCK-N-LOAD BUSHING SYSTEM
Switch dies from one caliber to another or change out die stations and begin reloading again in seconds. Once set, dies never needs readjusting. Bushing locks standard 7/8"-14 dies rock-solid in perfect alignment.

CASE ACTIVATED POWDER DROP
Get a charge of powder only when a cartridge is in place. Works with any cartridge, pistol to magnum rifle. Can be manually operated to check powder charge. Install the optional Lock-N-Load powder die for the fastest changeover of all progressive presses. Also fits RCBS measurer.

FIVE-STATION DIE PLATFORM
Five stations allow for all the variables and still let you use your standard dies — most 7/8"-14 dies and 7/8"-14 powder measures will work.

UNIVERSAL EJECTOR
Cases are automatically ejected into the included case catcher.

AUTOMATIC INDEXING
This very important feature automatically advances shells to the next station with the smoothest indexing of any press in this price range, and rotates every half stroke to lessen the chance of powder spillage.

CASE RETAINER
Quickly and easily remove and/or replace a case from the shell plate at any point in the cycle without extra retaining buttons. Case retainer fits all calibers.

LARGE CARTRIDGE CATCHER
A large capacity catcher comes standard with the L-N-L AP Press. An extra large capacity catcher which holds up to 1/3 more completed cartridges is available as an option.

*Note: Some manufacturers taper crimp dies may interfere with the ejector wire when they are used in station 5. Hornady New Dimension Taper Crimp Dies are designed to work flawlessly in station 5. If you will be using dies other than Hornady, we suggest that you use our powder through expander and install the taper crimp die in the 4th station. Ejector wires are set at the factory and we DO NOT RECOMMEND adjustment.

*Note: Shell plates have been re-designed for case ejection. We added a chamfer that allows cases to move easily in and out of the shell plate.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 11:29
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight


Joined: July/04/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 5087

gonna take a lot for this, but-- anything other than dillon is erector sets, gadgets to fiddle with, things that are not timed right, inability to improvise within the reloading cycle,

155 are hornady-- lot of controversy on bullet performance here and elsewhere, especially using "target" bullets. Usually the need to go to a lighter wt. in order to maintain velocity with downrange energy retention, would indicate a "bigger" gun. but I get about 2850 out of the 155 in 308s 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 13:36
Mike McDonald View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: September/01/2004
Status: Offline
Points: 734

In the distance I can hear a virtual lynch mob forming.................................................

 

I own a pair of Dillon 550's and find them to be very good machines which have given me many years and countless thousands of rounds of good service.  On the advise of a good and trusted friend who developed precision ammunition for sale to the public, I bought a Projector press.  the dillon doesn't get much use any more.

 

On the 168 grain Winchester ballistic silverttips.  Tried a case of that stuff to see what it was capable of.  It's 1 moa accurate at 1000 yards, and better than that inside 500 yards.  Don't know what they did but they did it right.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 14:30
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight


Joined: July/04/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 5087
whats projectors going for these days, mike?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 16:24
pyro6999 View Drop Down
Optics Retard
Optics Retard
Avatar
OT TITAN

Joined: December/22/2006
Location: North Dakota
Status: Offline
Points: 22024
i still say its hard to be an rcbs for the money and the simple fact that you are the quality control when it comes to powder charges and for an amatuer its another fail safe.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 17:21
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight


Joined: July/04/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 5087
The rockchucker or rock chucker bullet swager (were rcbs name came from and really wasn't done by the current company)  isn't that bad, its the stuff the company did later,and after they become blount. you should have had the chance to play with some of their linear progressive metallic stuff about 15 or so years ago.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 18:43
Mike McDonald View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: September/01/2004
Status: Offline
Points: 734

Dale,

I have about $600.00 in this rig, but I bought about every concievable option and accessory they had when I got it.

And no.......my Dillons are not for sale!

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/17/2007 at 19:57
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight


Joined: July/04/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 5087
How did you know??? (I was gonna ask that)
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/18/2007 at 03:29
spreader View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice


Joined: July/31/2007
Status: Offline
Points: 77
Originally posted by Mike McDonald Mike McDonald wrote:

I've used 64 pounds each,of N150, N550, N160 and N560 powder since 2001.

 

I like the 550 series for 175 grain bullets in gas guns, the 150 series for 175 grain bullets in bolt guns, and the 160/560 series for heavy bullets in 22 cal and 30 cal in bolt rifles.

 

It's decent powder with a larger velocity swing than the Hodgdens stuff and a huge knee in the velocity curve below 50 cegrees F.  I do find the accuracy slightly better with VV powders but not enough to keep a data book with 10 degree temp swings when the H series powders offer an advantage.

 

Think of VV powders as teh EU equivilent of the IIMR series.

 

I have not had a need to invest in the Lapua bullets as yet.



Mike,

Just to clarify, when you say this powder has larger velocity swing due to temperature change, which one you're referring to, the 100-series or the 500-series? If that's what you see with 500-series, then it's discouraging, I'm better off with Hodgdon Extreme series then. Although I always have this thought at the back of my mind "Hm, Hodgdon is essentially a blend of powders, since they don't actually manufacture the powder itself, so how can I be sure that it will be consistent from lot to lot?"

I'm relatively new to reloading, so I actually quickly found out for myself that I don't really like the quality of Sierra bullets and cases made by Remington,  and Winchester - too many inconsistencies. Too much prep work needed before I can do anything. Lapua cases are very uniformly sized, primer holes are drilled, not punched (so no need for deburring) and necks are annealed - saves me a lot of time that I otherwise have to waste on preparation of Remington or Winchester cases. With Lapua bullets it's the same story essentially. While the Sierra MatchKing are overall high quality, consistency is still not as good as that of Lapua. But then again, maybe it's because I measure every case and bullet with my Etalon calipers and micrometer. On a less accurate calipers/micrometers the inconsistency may go unnoticed. I still intend to use both types of bullets, since the pricing difference makes it perfectly sensible to practice with Sierra at lower cost.

Combination of Vihtavuori + Lapua brass + Lapua bullets is appealing though, since it's the same company. It's under two different roofs, but under same management essentially, so they're in best position for synergy. In US bullet manufacturers don't make powder (and often don't make cases), and powder manufacturers definitely don't make either the bullets or the cases.

By the way, out of curiosity, do you use different primers for loads for your bolt guns vs. your M1A? I'm somewhat partial to CCI, they seem to be very consistent and I really like their "strip" system, makes it easy to prime many cases quickly.






Edited by spreader
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/18/2007 at 08:28
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight


Joined: July/04/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 5087
what gun you shootin the good stuff in spreader? most store boughts can't see the difference.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/18/2007 at 08:29
Mike McDonald View Drop Down
Optics Journeyman
Optics Journeyman


Joined: September/01/2004
Status: Offline
Points: 734

, the 100-series or the 500-series?

The 100 series swings less than the 500 series.  The 500 series is a double based blend of nitrogliceryn and nitrocellulose while the 100 series is a single based powder.  Both have a steep knee in the curve below 50 degrees F.

 

, Hodgdon is essentially a blend of powders

All cannister powders are a blend of powders to arrive at a specific burn rate.

When reloading, note lot numbers in your load book.  When changing lots always work back to your velocity or charge weight.

Found that VV, Hodgden, Alliant all have inconsistancies from lot to lot.  Had 4 lots of Re-15 that were exact to charge weight -vs- velocity then 2 lots that were not.

It's just something to account for in the process, and easily done.

 

. Too much prep work needed before I can do anything.

Now is where it really does become personal preference and individual technique.

One of the worlds top shooters switched from Lapua to Winchester as he found no signifigant gain in accuracy over standard Winchester brass.

If you are shooting benchrest, you'll only have 20 or so match cases to load, all carefully prepared and numbered.

If you're going to shoot anything else you may well find that case prep is a very fun thing, and relaxing, but past proper sizing to your rifles chamber and trimming to a uniform langth, all those things we all want to do yield almost no real world  gain for the effort.  New reloaders all want to be really anal about brass prep, we all did it, and then you find that the very simple things result in best performance.

For example, I have gone from owning and using every brass and bullet prep tool on earth to doing the following for loads I compete with;

Weigh brass and segregate into lots ( bought in lots of 1000 and separated)

After you go through 2-3000 rounds you have 4 usefull lots of brass.

F/L resize when new.

Trim to uniform length

Uniform primer pockets

Sierra bullets for comp get uniformed and weighed.  This gains just enough consistancy to be noticed past 600 yards.  I still use non-prepped bullets for practice, the gain is so slight.

All powder charges are weighed after a charge weight is deternined.

New powder lots are tested when purchased.

Purchase primers in bulk.  Buy 8,000 primers for your new barrel, all same lot.

That ends that hassle.  New barrel, new primers.

I use scale check weights.

 

.....use different primers for loads for your bolt guns vs. your M1A?

 

No, I use Federal 210 primers  ( not match) in all loads except ball powder, then I use WLR primers.  This has proven to be a consistant recipe for sucessfull load development that I've adhered to for 20 years.

 

The overall sumary is that I try to uncomplicate a process that can become overly complex just because we want it to.  Results show that less can really be more.

 

 

 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/18/2007 at 12:08
Blackbird View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice


Joined: February/10/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 279

spreader,

 

I use only Lapua brass these days, and you are correct, its the most consistant out there. But, the flash holes are punched not drilled, at least in the 6BR Norma, & .243Win. cases. Now, I know that Norma drills the flash holes in their brass. I haven't used any of todays Norma brass, I have heard that it is too soft, and it is more expensive than Lapua, so ain't no reason for me to change.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/19/2007 at 03:12
spreader View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice


Joined: July/31/2007
Status: Offline
Points: 77
Originally posted by Mike McDonald Mike McDonald wrote:

, the 100-series or the 500-series?

The 100 series swings less than the 500 series.  The 500 series is a double based blend of nitrogliceryn and nitrocellulose while the 100 series is a single based powder.  Both have a steep knee in the curve below 50 degrees F.

 

, Hodgdon is essentially a blend of powders

All cannister powders are a blend of powders to arrive at a specific burn rate.

When reloading, note lot numbers in your load book.  When changing lots always work back to your velocity or charge weight.

Found that VV, Hodgden, Alliant all have inconsistancies from lot to lot.  Had 4 lots of Re-15 that were exact to charge weight -vs- velocity then 2 lots that were not.

It's just something to account for in the process, and easily done.

 

. Too much prep work needed before I can do anything.

Now is where it really does become personal preference and individual technique.

One of the worlds top shooters switched from Lapua to Winchester as he found no signifigant gain in accuracy over standard Winchester brass.

If you are shooting benchrest, you'll only have 20 or so match cases to load, all carefully prepared and numbered.

If you're going to shoot anything else you may well find that case prep is a very fun thing, and relaxing, but past proper sizing to your rifles chamber and trimming to a uniform langth, all those things we all want to do yield almost no real world  gain for the effort.  New reloaders all want to be really anal about brass prep, we all did it, and then you find that the very simple things result in best performance.

For example, I have gone from owning and using every brass and bullet prep tool on earth to doing the following for loads I compete with;

Weigh brass and segregate into lots ( bought in lots of 1000 and separated)

After you go through 2-3000 rounds you have 4 usefull lots of brass.

F/L resize when new.

Trim to uniform length

Uniform primer pockets

Sierra bullets for comp get uniformed and weighed.  This gains just enough consistancy to be noticed past 600 yards.  I still use non-prepped bullets for practice, the gain is so slight.

All powder charges are weighed after a charge weight is deternined.

New powder lots are tested when purchased.

Purchase primers in bulk.  Buy 8,000 primers for your new barrel, all same lot.

That ends that hassle.  New barrel, new primers.

I use scale check weights.

 

.....use different primers for loads for your bolt guns vs. your M1A?

 

No, I use Federal 210 primers  ( not match) in all loads except ball powder, then I use WLR primers.  This has proven to be a consistant recipe for sucessfull load development that I've adhered to for 20 years.

 

The overall sumary is that I try to uncomplicate a process that can become overly complex just because we want it to.  Results show that less can really be more.



Mike,

Just realized that 64 pounds of powder, with average weight per load being 45 grains comes to nearly 10,000 rounds. That's quite a lot of shooting, and quite likely more than one barrel. Someone has a lot of free time on their hands

As far as VV powder goes - thanks, this is helpful information. That's actually very surprising, since usually double-base powder is supposed to be more stable in different environmental conditions.

I guess I will stick to Hodgdon for the time being. Any recommendations for use with 308 Win in Sako TRG-22? Varget or H4895?

By the way, somewhat unrelated question. I'm curious, what barrel twist would be sufficient to stabilize 185grain bullet in 308 Win?

When I mentioned that Hodgdon is blended powder, what I really meant is that they don't manufacture the powder itself. If I'm not mistaken, gun powder today is manufactured by only three companies in US - DuPont, Alliant as part of ATK and Olin Corporation. I might be wrong about Olin, but DuPont I'm certain about, unless ATK already bought their gunpowder making business too. If someone has more up-to-date information I would be glad to hear it.

Vihtavuori actually manufactures their powder, therefore giving them more control than what Hodgdon can have.

I thought about weighing all new brass, but then realized - if I later fully resize it and need to trim, it may very well turn out that 1 grain weight difference between the brand new cases disappears with removed material. And trying to make the process easier is what I'm after as well, that's why I personally prefer Lapua brass, because it seems that cases are far more consistent, therefore making my life easier.  May potentially move towards Lapua bullets as well, for anything beyond 500 meters. Time and practice will tell.

And I agree, no reason to sweat too much for making practice ammo up to say 500 meters. It's only what gets used beyond that, that has to  be done very very carefully. I don't compete in benchrest, don't find it personally interesting. Of all the current long-range civilian competitions F-Class probably appeals the most to me. It's somewhat irregular though, I guess in few years if it becomes much more popular it would be of more interest, since local competitions will hopefully happen more often. But even without competitions, shooting long-range was always most interesting to me - very challenging and thus very rewarding.

However, being very far from "nearest" 1000-yard range also makes a good argument for painstakingly making more than just 20 rounds to use at that distance. After all, traveling over 200 miles to such range with the goal of practicing at that distance with only 20 rounds makes little sense. So, naturally, I need to load more than 20 rounds at once, that's why I need simple, repeatable and consistent process.

In fact, I don't even try to do it all at once in the same day. One day I would prep the cases, another day select bullets, yet another day prime the cases. The only time I do two things in one day is powder charge and seat the bullet.

Then check the assembled cartridges, which now would include using the Bersin tool I recently bought.

I can seat the bullets and then make slight adjustments, making sure every cartridge has a bullet dead-center, once again improving consistency. Still getting used to it, and though it's one more tool to have (and mess up with), it should be helpful. Reloading for 1000-yard use is probably never about saving time and money Although calculated over 10+ year period it would probably save quite a lot.

I'm actually also at the stage where I'm trying to decide whether I should use traditional press (I have Forster Co-Ax) and dies or arbor press (like Haydon's) with L.E. Wilson dies. Arbor press with L.E. Wilson dies makes it all very easy and simple. At the same time, full-length resizing is easier with traditional press. I guess I will be keeping both for a while.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/19/2007 at 03:16
spreader View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice


Joined: July/31/2007
Status: Offline
Points: 77
Originally posted by Blackbird Blackbird wrote:

spreader,

 

I use only Lapua brass these days, and you are correct, its the most consistant out there. But, the flash holes are punched not drilled, at least in the 6BR Norma, & .243Win. cases. Now, I know that Norma drills the flash holes in their brass. I haven't used any of todays Norma brass, I have heard that it is too soft, and it is more expensive than Lapua, so ain't no reason for me to change.



Interesting. If Lapua punches the primer holes, these have to be the cleanest punched holes I have seen in cartridge brass. So, it's way better than Winchester and Remington anyway. I have bought 1000 cases of Lapua in 308 Win, after trying small batches from Winchester, Remington and Lapua. I haven't seen a single Lapua case with burrs in primer hole. And they're very consistent in terms of size and weight. And annealed necks are a big plus.


Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/19/2007 at 03:28
spreader View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice


Joined: July/31/2007
Status: Offline
Points: 77
Originally posted by Dale Clifford Dale Clifford wrote:

what gun you shootin the good stuff in spreader? most store boughts can't see the difference.


From now on it would be Sako TRG-22. Really like it. More so than any US-made "factory" rifle currently made in fact.

And you're probably right - most store-bought rifles would see no difference, but since most store-bought rifles probably can't shoot accurately beyond 500 meters, reloading for those rifles makes sense only if you practice a lot and already have a reloading gear.

Also, I bought some Black Hills match ammo once - out of 200 rounds I had to put aside about 20-25 rounds which I probably should return to Black Hills - they have necks that are almost collapsed. That's NEW ammo.

When I'm the "manufacturer", the "quality control manager" and the "consumer" - I have a better chance of producing something I could really use
And I actually find the process quite relaxing. Maybe it's just me
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/19/2007 at 11:03
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight


Joined: July/04/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 5087

JBM has a good "twist rate" calculator.  check out their site.

shoot long range couple of times a week, 500 to 2 miles, usually load 100 300 win. mag, 200  308, 100 6.5-284, usually 200  223 sometimes less (usually work in 400-600 IPSC practice rds, and some skeet on weekends for relaxation if no match) . my grandma can shoot 500 yds. who shoots it the fastest wins  (her arthritis acts up occasionally and hurts her times)

 disagree that practice loads require less attention than match rounds or loads for ranges less than 500 yds, if your practicing, especially for a match, and don't place importance on each and every shot, the only thing you've learned or practice is that the gun goes bam when you pull the trigger-- can't use the excuse you missed because of non-quality ammo. Dillons work great.

only real advantage I've found to Lap brass is "stiffer" primer pockets allowing more hot loads per reloading.

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  1 2 3>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Similar Threads: "Lapua bullets and Vihtavuori powder"
Subject Author Forum Replies Last Post
WTS: 6.5mm Lapua Scenar 139gr. bullets ceylonc Hunting and Shooting Gear For Sale 0
Lapua 6mm bullets jkll Reloading & Ballistics 5
VIHTAVUORI 650 338LAPUASLAP Reloading & Ballistics 4
6.5x47 Lapua hunterwingler Firearms 10
Scope for .338 Lapua???? sniper13 Tactical Scopes 17
.338 Win Mag vs..338 Lapua? drd34 Firearms 57
Will SS10x42 work for .338 Lapua? readusm Rifle Scopes 12
Bijou Creek Custom 338 Lapua Kickboxer The Range Report 12
338 Lapua koshkin Firearms 56
.338 LAPUA MAGNUM LOADS 338LAPUASLAP Reloading & Ballistics 10


This page was generated in 0.297 seconds.