New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Is the doubler practicle to use?
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Check GunBroker.com for SWFA's No Reserve and No Minimum bid firearm auctions.

Is the doubler practicle to use?

 Post Reply Post Reply   Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2008 at 11:53
windstrings View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: October/19/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 81
I have a pair of Swarovski EL 8.5 X 42 and was considering the doubler.

Although I've seem pictures of it.. I've never seen pictures of it "installed".

Does it cause the side chosen to mount it on to stick out farther than the other?

I've read where some would put it on and use one eye to see the distance and the other for up close.

I would think that would be somewhat of a hassle to use unless both eye pieces were equal "standard non magnified vs. the doubler added".

Can anyone comment on their practical uses and would they recommend it?

I've also suspected its quality since they don't seem to offer a "tripler" like some of the other companies.... I didn't know if that was because of quality issues at the higher magnifications or whether they just chose to not offer it.


Edited by windstrings - February/08/2008 at 11:55
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2008 at 12:31
Bird Watcher View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: August/30/2006
Status: Offline
Points: 1490
Originally posted by windstrings windstrings wrote:


Does it cause the side chosen to mount it on to stick out farther than the other? I would think that would be somewhat of a hassle to use unless both eye pieces were equal "standard non magnified vs. the doubler added".

Yes, it sticks out.
Basically you are turning one side of the binocular into a monocular spotting scope.

Here's some spec.'s:
Doubler

Notice that the length is 4.53" long.



Edited by Bird Watcher - February/08/2008 at 12:35
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2008 at 13:58
lucznik View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master


Joined: November/27/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1436

Someone else asked me about the use of a doubler a few months ago.  Here is the (slightly updated) response I gave him. 

Originally posted by lucznik lucznik wrote:

I have the 2.5x "doubler" for my 10x43 Bushnell Elite.  It is a little different from the Zeiss tripler and Swarovski doubler in that it is a friction fit unit whereas the Zeiss and Swaro have screw-on attachments.  The Vortex and EO doublers also are of the friction-fit style.

Both types have their pros and cons.  Being a screw on unit the Zeiss and Swaro products will, in theory, be able to provide increased precision in the alignment and placement of the optics and therefore might (again in theory,) provide slightly better optical performance.   The downside to the Z and S products is that in order to mount them, you must remove the eyecup from the binocular to gain access to the threads.  This is both time consuming and requires disasembly - which means added wear and tear on the binocular.  It also is prone to cross threading if the individual is not careful about screwing them on (I know of at least one person who claims to have had this problem) and if the threads are not kept free of debris.  As a friction-fit unit, the Bushnell product has no chance of cross-threading and does not require the removal of anything from off the binocular.  I suppose that with time and frequent use the amount of friction could be reduced creating problems but, only time will tell  (and the warranty will "repair." )

I really like my doubler.  The image from it is not comparable to a full-size 60-80mm ED spotting scope but, it's not intended to be either.  I would say that the image quality is probably at least as good (if not better) than I've seen from a lot of budget-class (under $300) full-size spotters like those from Burris, Simmons, Tasco, Alpen, BSA, Yukon, and even Bushnell, etc. Having said that I should point out that I haven't yet had the chance to do an actual head-to-head comparison so; I'm only going off of memory. Regardless, when you couple this excellent image quality with the fact that it only weighs 4.5 ounces [6.17 oz. for the Swarovski]  and slips so easily and comfortably in a pocket or daypack, they definately qualify as a superior product in my book.

I still really like the doubler. It is a fairly specialized tool but, I sure did love having it last year during the deer hunt where a friend and I packed way into the backcountry. My full size spotting scope was simply out of the question and this little doubler performed yeoman's service.  I still think it is as good as, if not better than, most sub-$300 spotting scopes I've seen.


Edited by lucznik - February/08/2008 at 14:00
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2008 at 14:44
RifleDude View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar

Joined: October/13/2006
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 14313
Thanks for your post, lucznik; I never thought of it that way.  I always looked at those doublers as somewhat of a gimmick, but your explanation makes logical sense and I can see where even with its limitations, it would still be useful under the circumstances you describe. 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2008 at 14:52
windstrings View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: October/19/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 81
Although not as serious nor as nice as a full spotting scope... if the higher end units really give good optics, it could sure be a fun after thought to play with for astronomy while camping or actually when finding yourself in that unusual  pinch when you would have never dreamed you would need one.... and there you are, out in the middle of nowhere and would love to be able to see something really far off, just a little bit better.... but they are not cheap... unless they maintain the swarovski quality optics for final viewing, I think I would rather spend my money on a high powered monocular or similar and not be messing with my binoculars.

But the viewing ease must also be a consideration.... if when mounted I can simply shut one eye and choose which side to view from, then great, but If it renders the whole binocular useless for normal viewing until removed, then I don't think I would want it.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2008 at 17:10
lucznik View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master


Joined: November/27/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1436
When it is mounted it does extend the length of the effected optical barrel.  You can still look through the other optical barrel though, it is a little bit awkward.   Removing the doubler is very, very quick and easy - at least the friction fit ones are.  Of course, it should go without saying (though I still will say it) that to get the very best images, you should mount the whole thing on a tripod. 
 
I've not looked through the Swaro or Zeiss units so, I can't speak to their quality other than to make two points:
 
First, you're talking about Swarovski and Zeiss, two giants in the optical market.  How bad could the quality really be?
Second, I have a book called The Traditional Bowhunter's Handbook by T.J.Conrads.  In it he has a chapter on optics in which he speaks highly of his Zeiss binocular and the Zeiss tripler with it.  I've met T.J. and am confident that his assessment is honest.
 
The Bushnell unit I have offers, as I've already stated, views that I feel are at least comparable to that of the various sub-$300 spotters available.  It is very useable as a small fixed-power spotting scope. With it's 3-position eyecup I am easily able to see the full FoV, even though I wear glasses. In addition to the good optical performance, the doubler's meager 4.5 ounce weight puts it in an entirely different class than any high powered monocular you might slip into your pack.  I will concede that, if said monocular is of very high quality, the image might prove better but, you will pay for that in much increased bulk and weight.
 
The Bushnell Elite 2.5x "doubler" cost me $160. (The S & Z units are about twice that much - pretty much par for the course.)
 
For really serious, extended glassing you will want a larger, true spotting scope.  But, I'd rather spend $160 on a doubler than $300 on a budget-class scope.  And even if you have to spend the $350 or so for the Swaro or Zeiss, I'm certain you'll still get better performance than you would from a similarly priced spotting scope.
 
BTW, if you want to try the concept but, just can't justify spending the cash to get the Swaro or Zeiss, or if your binocular is not one of these brands, the lower cost Bushnell unit (because of it's friction fit style) will fit onto just about any full size (40mm+) and some mid size (30mm+) binocular, regardless of brand/model.  Either that or you can come to Wyoming and I'll let you take a look through mine!Bandito
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2008 at 17:29
windstrings View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: October/19/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 81
I think your right about rather having a doubler with a good quality glass than a spotting scope with lower.... although you get the added FOV etc, high quality glass is indeed intoxicating and hard to go back to less.
I would think the friction style would be real hit and miss as to achieving the  exact right focal length etc to achieve perfect results... I'm surprised it works as well as it does.

Maybe  I'm spoiled, but I just can't see the logic in buying too cheap for something that I will use for years and years.... its almost like a prolonged agony of buyers remorse.... I would rather go for the gusto or just wait till I can get what I really want... in the meantime buy "really budjet" just to get by for the immediate crisis.

I expect I will have to try out the doubler as its a nifty little add-on that has allot of potential.
If you look at my avatar, you will see I have one eye that sticks out farther than the other one anyway!  Whacko


Edited by windstrings - February/08/2008 at 17:33
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2008 at 18:02
lucznik View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master


Joined: November/27/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1436
Originally posted by windstrings windstrings wrote:

...you get the added FOV etc
It's difficult to comment about the FoV as I've been unable to pin down any exact figures as to the FoV for binoculars of various powers when using the doubler.  I can say that the FoV does not appear to be unusually narrow by any means.   If anyone can provide actual concrete values, I would be very grateful.
 
Originally posted by windstrings windstrings wrote:

...I would think the friction style would be real hit and miss as to achieving the  exact right focal length etc to achieve perfect results... I'm surprised it works as well as it does.
As I mentioned, only time will tell.  So far, I have had no difficulty with mine.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/08/2008 at 18:19
Bird Watcher View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: August/30/2006
Status: Offline
Points: 1490
Originally posted by lucznik lucznik wrote:

Of course, it should go without saying (though I still will say it) that to get the very best images, you should mount the whole thing on a tripod. 


Just a quick comment....

There are some really good monopods out there as well, my favorite is the Manfrotto 682B self-standing pro.

Here's a picture:

Manfrotto Monopod

Edited by Bird Watcher - February/08/2008 at 18:32
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Similar Threads: "Is the doubler practicle to use?"
Subject Author Forum Replies Last Post
2X or 3X "Doublers" Cocadori Binoculars 0
? re: doublers/triplers lucznik Binoculars 5 12/5/2006 11:21:05 AM
2X or 3X doublers ?’s for Swaro ro Zeiss GenauJager Binoculars 1 5/20/2007 10:21:01 PM
uso doubler??? gregester Rifle Scopes 0


This page was generated in 0.438 seconds.