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Grilled Venison Back Strap Roll

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/26/2009 at 17:57
RifleDude View Drop Down
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Here is a delicious way to prepare venison back strap that a hunting buddy of mine taught me, and we've tweaked it to it's current version, below...

Ingredients:
1 venison back strap 8 - 12 inches long, split in half lengthwise, like a hotdog bun
1 - 1-1/2 lb of thick sliced bacon
3/4 lb. of your favorite sausage
(if they are in links, remove casings.  I've been using bulk Italian sausage without casings).
3/4 cup of Pace picante sauce or similar salsa
(I use medium, but you can use mild or hot, depending on your preference)
Salt
Coarse ground or cracked black pepper
Garlic powder
Olive Oil
Box of sturdy wooden toothpicks

1.  Start a bed of coals going on a grill.  I DO NOT use a gas grill.  I prefer the flavor a wood/charcoal grill gives to meat.

2.  On a flat surface, lay enough bacon slices side by side to equal the length of the back strap.

3.  Place 1 of the back strap halves across (perpendicular) to the bacon slices, with equal amount of bacon on each side.  This will make wrapping the bacon around the back strap easier later.

4.  Mix the sausage and salsa together thoroughly.

5.  Season with salt, pepper, and garlic powder to suit, inside and outside the back strap halves.

6.  Spread the sausage / salsa mixture evenly between the back strap halves and fold the two back strap halves together.

7.  Being careful not to squeeze the back strap too much to keep the sausage in place, wrap the bacon around the back strap and pin each slice in place with toothpicks.

8.  When all the strips are in place and pinned, wrap a few bacon strips lengthwise around each end and pin in place with toothpicks to keep the sausage/ salsa mix from running out the sides during cooking.

9.  Brush the entire outside of the roll lightly with olive oil, then sprinkle with garlic and cracked black pepper.

10.  Let the roll sit in the fridge for awhile to let the flavors mellow while you break open a few beers.

11.  After you have finished off a couple beers, check your coals and make sure they are uniformly white hot.  Place some hardwood chunks on one side of your coals to get some good wood smoke going. 

12.  Once your grill is nice and hot and you have some good wood smoke going, place the roll on the grill and cover.  Pop open a beer.

13.  Grill for 12-15 min for each side.  When the heat is right, the bacon will be crisp, but not quite "burned."  After grilling the 1st side, rotate the roll 180 degrees to grill the 2nd side.  Open another beer.   Then, rotate 90 degrees and repeat.  Time for another beer.  Then, rotate 180 degrees to grill the 4th and final side.  Total grill time should be 48 - 60 min.

14.  Remove from grill, slice in 1/4" - 1/2" slices and serve as main course.  Red wine goes very well with this!

ENJOY!!!




Edited by RifleDude - July/26/2009 at 18:01
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/26/2009 at 18:17
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X = 180 Y = 90 (X+Pyro)+(Y-Pyro) = ?

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Nice recipe! Unfortunately I'd be too drunk to eat by the time it was done.Bucky
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/26/2009 at 21:15
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Wish I had seen this earlier... had back straps for dinner.  Wrapped in applewood bacon, after marinating for a week, smoked with hickory.  
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/26/2009 at 21:22
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OT TITAN

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so we are talking like a case of beer?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/26/2009 at 21:26
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Over to Ted... I didn't use any...
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/27/2009 at 09:33
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The recipe sounds good, but after so many beers how do you know the Venison is any good? 
or is it after so many beers it doesn't matter what it taste like. Roll on Floor Laughing 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/27/2009 at 11:40
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show me your sheep!!

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MMMmmm......Tastes like Beer!
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/27/2009 at 20:46
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I'm glad I ain't the only one who picked up on the drinkin'....but that sounds good  Merry Christmas
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/27/2009 at 21:03
RifleDude View Drop Down
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Just joking on the copius beer-itude... sort of.  I do advocate enjoying a crisp, cold brewsky anytime a man does cooking the way God intended... with fire... outdoors.  The journey toward the finished product is part of the culinary enjoyment!

...but maybe I got carried away on the frequency.Wink
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/27/2009 at 21:13
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Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

Just joking on the copius beer-itude... sort of.  I do advocate enjoying a crisp, cold brewsky anytime a man does cooking the way God intended... with fire... outdoors.  The journey toward the finished product is part of the culinary enjoyment!

...but maybe I got carried away on the frequency.Wink
 
No, you're good....as long as everyone can walk/stagger/crawl home Big Grin
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/27/2009 at 21:20
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show me your sheep!!

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MMmmm still tastes like Beer
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/31/2009 at 20:51
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It seems obvious, but recipes like this one are a standard in cooking venison.  Fat, pork, lots of flavor and grilled, how can that be anything but delicious?  A couple of years ago I did a Successful Hunter column on a variation of this: with fresh salsa instead of bottled, but otherwise, very close. 
The other recipe I've run into a lot is a triple play of Lipton onion soup mix, jelly and dressing.   In UP Michigan it was the onion soup mix with an 8 ounce bottle of Catalina dressing and a 16 ounce can of whole cranberry sauce.  In my hometown, it's the soup mix with apricot jelly and a fairly local dressing--I believe called Marie's or something like that.  It's basically a Thousand Island dressing.  
I liked the cranberry sauce variation on white meated birds like ruffed grouse.  The sweeter apricot jelly version worked really well on dabbler ducks and geese.   (The cranberry, in fact ended up in my Upland Game Bird Cookbook.   (Mix the three ingredients, pour over whole or parted out birds and bake at 350 until done.)  Still have to watch out that you don't overcook the birds.   One camp cook I knew used to bake this until overdone, and it made even ruffed grouse gamy.  That's gotta be a sin.
Eileen
 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/02/2009 at 12:14
RifleDude View Drop Down
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Originally posted by Eileen Clarke Eileen Clarke wrote:

A couple of years ago I did a Successful Hunter column on a variation of this: with fresh salsa instead of bottled, but otherwise, very close.   
 
Welcome, Eileen; we're glad you're here!  I look forward to learning some new ways to cook game from you! 
 
My buddy said he got the original version of the above from a hunting magazine, so it may very well have come from you.  If it did, YOU ARE MY HERO, because we've really enjoyed this recipe!
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/20/2009 at 20:29
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Hey, RifleDude, I have to admit I got the 'original' recipe from a fan.  (Thanked him in the column).  Wonder who DID invent the first red meat stuffed with pork fat???   Whoever it was was probably pretty popular around the cave. 
Eileen
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/20/2009 at 21:50
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Eileen, I asked my buddy where he found the recipe, and he told me he didn't remember the magazine, but he tore it out of a magazine in a doctor's office waiting room.  LOL!

Nothing provides flavor and moistness to meat like good, ole fashioned FAT!!!Bandito

When I'm cooking steaks, I try to select those with the most marbling, and in the final stages of cooking, I slather on a bit of seasoned butter.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/21/2009 at 20:56
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RifleDude, when we were in New Zealand, the guys put me on the spot.  Dinner was fallow deer steaks, and I was 'invited' to fix them.   Long story short, I grilled them.  And slathered on a garlic butter--with a bit of salt and  pepper--on all of them just before we took them off the grill.   The tray was swimming in garlic butter sauce when it came to the table.   Delicious.
John kind of had the same thing happen in caribou camp.  Someone had shot a couple of snow geese, and the rest of the guys in camp said, "Hey your wife's a cook.  Let's see what you can do with them."   Now, John's challenge was a bit tougher;  I mean I had an entire kitchen to drum something up.  He had a drop camp.  On the other hand he's the more adventurous of us, as an eater.  He's eaten blubber, and caribou eyeball, fresh, a real delicacy, or so they told him.  The wildest I ever got was Blood Pudding, in Ireland.  (the taste was good, but the texture was gritty.  Ireland?  Oatmeal?)
Anyway, he wandered into the cook's tent, and came back out with some a quart of reconstituted Crystal Light (ascorbic acid) and a chopped onion.  Boiled it a bit, then cooled it and marinated the boned breasts for an hour.   And to make sure they didn't get ruined after that, he grilled them himself, to medium rare. 
John tells me they were all surprised.  The actually liked it.  Ate it all up.   
Eileen
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/22/2009 at 08:58
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Originally posted by Eileen Clarke Eileen Clarke wrote:

RifleDude, when we were in New Zealand, the guys put me on the spot.  Dinner was fallow deer steaks, and I was 'invited' to fix them.   Long story short, I grilled them.  And slathered on a garlic butter--with a bit of salt and  pepper--on all of them just before we took them off the grill.   The tray was swimming in garlic butter sauce when it came to the table.   Delicious.
John kind of had the same thing happen in caribou camp.  Someone had shot a couple of snow geese, and the rest of the guys in camp said, "Hey your wife's a cook.  Let's see what you can do with them."   Now, John's challenge was a bit tougher;  I mean I had an entire kitchen to drum something up.  He had a drop camp.  On the other hand he's the more adventurous of us, as an eater.  He's eaten blubber, and caribou eyeball, fresh, a real delicacy, or so they told him.  The wildest I ever got was Blood Pudding, in Ireland.  (the taste was good, but the texture was gritty.  Ireland?  Oatmeal?)
Anyway, he wandered into the cook's tent, and came back out with some a quart of reconstituted Crystal Light (ascorbic acid) and a chopped onion.  Boiled it a bit, then cooled it and marinated the boned breasts for an hour.   And to make sure they didn't get ruined after that, he grilled them himself, to medium rare. 
John tells me they were all surprised.  The actually liked it.  Ate it all up.   
Eileen


Crystal Light... interesting!  When you think about it, why not?  In a pinch, the lemonade and orange flavors could substitute for lemon and orange juice to add sweetness and acidity.

In our hunting camp, we like to make what we call "Whatchagot Stew."   The ingredients?  You guessed it -- "whatever ya got!"  It's a permanent camp at our deer hunting lease, with all the conveniences of home, so we always keep a good supply of canned goods there year-round.

Basically, in a large covered pot sufficient to hold enough stew to feed 4-5 guys, we start out by browning any ground meat with some chopped onions and, when available, large sliced mushrooms.  Then, we add either beef broth (if the ground meat is a red meat) or chicken broth (if we are using chicken or other fowl), then throw in stewed tomatoes, whatever combination of fresh or canned vegetables we can round up from our camp stores, and occasionally some shape of pasta (elbow, bowtie, whatever).  We often pour in a beer or a little wine if we have it available (it is a hunting camp, after all).  Season with either garlic, salt, red and black pepper and/or Tony Cacherie's Creole Seasoning and/or Cavendar's Greek Seasoning and/or whatever your favorite seasoning blend is, add water if needed, and simmer the concoction for a couple hours.  It never turns out the same, because we almost never have the same ingredients available, but it is almost always surprisingly good!  I especially like using 2 lb. of bulk hot Italian sausage as my meat, because it supplies a good amount of grease and a nice combination of sweet/hot/savory flavors to the stew.

Of course we don't keep many of the ingredients at the camp that we often use, which technically violates the rules of "Whatchagot Stew," which were that you can only use ingredients that you can find in the camp food pantry.  But, as with everything a group of guys do, it became a competition, so we now frequently bring ingredients with us beforehand.


Edited by RifleDude - August/22/2009 at 09:14
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/22/2009 at 09:07
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Originally posted by Eileen Clarke Eileen Clarke wrote:

On the other hand he's the more adventurous of us, as an eater.  He's eaten blubber, and caribou eyeball, fresh, a real delicacy, or so they told him.


Ever watch that show "Man Vs. Wild?"  Bear Grylls would give John a run for his money for the "adventurous eater" title!Wink
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/22/2009 at 22:46
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Okay, but he's getting paid to do it.  John does it for free. 
Eileen
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/23/2009 at 09:32
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I once got paid $20.00 to eat a cockroach...
Not sure it was worth it.  Nasty tasting thing...
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/23/2009 at 11:37
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little tabasco will help.
 
From that statement I am going to assume you used to drink heavily! Cool


Edited by budperm - August/23/2009 at 11:40
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/24/2009 at 09:00
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I just needed the money...
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/24/2009 at 13:03
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Get Your Popcorn Ready   Sooo many opinions.... Im gonna try the recipe with the fat and without the
roaches....   Cheers
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/24/2009 at 13:15
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Looks exactly like the one I ate...


OK, I'll quit.  The memory is repulsive...
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/25/2009 at 21:03
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I hear grasshhoppers are really good deep fried and dipped in chocolate. I got a lot of the raw matierial in my garden.  Not my cup of tea.  Shall I send you some?
Eileen
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