New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Everything ultra-light... with in a budget
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Check GunBroker.com for SWFA's No Reserve and No Minimum bid firearm auctions.

Everything ultra-light... with in a budget

 Post Reply Post Reply   Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options Page  1 2 3 5>
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/07/2012 at 15:58
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
With the new year starting the manufacturers are going to start releasing "new gear". The new gear is worthless if it is a hassle to use it. A big part of that is fatigue and a big part that is caused by inadequate gear that is - to heavy, non-breathable, overkill, wrong minded, what have ya.
BASE LAYER
I guess the first place to start is base layers. I hunt year around and am not made of money. So I think of all conditions gear. I used to race mountain bike and still backpack(bighorns,absaroka mountains in Wyoming) and dayhike(the Colorado "14er's" several each year) year around. And instructed cold/hot weather training in the guard up in North Dakota. Alot of trial and error used.
 
"Hunting Gear" clothing is way behind the times and overpriced. So I look to mountaineering/biking/hiking/climbing clothing instead.
 
REI and sierra trading post are two of my go too places for clothing but any mountaineering/backpacking/biking/climbing store with good deals will of course work. They have brands that have up to date "clothing tech" like windstopper, truely breathable fabric, real water resistant(no such thing as "waterproof" in clothing i.e. zippers, buttons, seams, etc.). Not glorified overpriced overwieght "cabelas" cotton duck and so on. Fancy names like scentlok - which by the they make a person sweat so much it has to "LOK" in the scent. The key is not to over overexert(because of the wrong gear) in the first place to cut down on things that give your position away like - sweating,labored breathing,etc. with these things going against you one can use all of the scentlok and cover scent/killer they want... it will not make any difference. That is like putting a band aid on a broken arm sure it may look like your fixing the problem area but all you have to do ask the arm if it is working.
 
Controlling the bodys core in the cold/mild/heat with right type and amount of layering and the most important part is the base layer. Please take the quote "Cotton Kills" seriously number one killer of pioneering antarctic/arctic/mountaineering explorers. Now that might necessarily not be the case hunting very few people die from the heat/cold hunting but, cotton is not helping in any way. Cotton - being overweight - does NOT pack small - does NOT breathe - and is very poor at insulating in cold or hot conditions.
 
This brand seems a little pricey but, in the long run it will save on mid/outer layer cost. Plus it can be used on other than hunting activitys.  I have used this in conjunction with a light windstopper softshell outer layer(jacket/pants) in around zero degree temps being just fine. Being many times lighter and more mobile than any cotton gear plus being infinitely more breathable therefore less scent to deal with. Cost depending on the deals being found I have found being at or even less than the "old fashioned gear".
 
On the next posts I will go over some of my findings boots/mid/outer layering then after that packs, slings, knives, electronics, and so on.
 
I am always looking for new ways/things to improve my hunting experience so any input would be most welcome. That is why I started this thread.
 
Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile


Edited by rustic - January/11/2012 at 21:33
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 17:18
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
Boots - unless it is around zero or below. I like to use an uninsulated boot with a shank for reducing foot fatigue I learded this from backpacking. In the past I have used bulky heavy(cabelas or whatever) but, doing any hiking while hunting putting extra Oz's on your feet = to pounds in your pack.
I also prefer non-goretex foot wear because it really does not breathe anywhere near as well as leather/nylon/etc. with water-resistant applications.
 
Socks I like as thin as I can get by with because less material means less perspiration to deal with. I like thicker socks with gore-tex though.
 http://www.feeturesbrand.com/

Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile


Edited by rustic - January/11/2012 at 21:33
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 17:25
cheaptrick View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar

Joined: September/27/2004
Location: South Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 20478
I've recently started wearing Under Armour cold weather gear on a job site in N Ohio this year. Outstanding gear! Light weight and it works as advertised. 


I have the base layer "3", but I'm sure the "4" would be that much better. 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 20:04
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
The better the base layer the more forgiving the of the choice outer layers have to be.

Edited by rustic - January/08/2012 at 20:56
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 20:24
Bitterroot Bulls View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: May/07/2009
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 3382
This a topic I am passionate about. I will post a lot, I am sure, but I am really interested in hearing about others' kit.

Base layers are a great place to start. I have used Patagonia Capilene for years. I still think it is the best poly available. Lately I have been supplementing my Capilene with high quality merino wool base layers from Patagonia, First Light, and Kuiu. Merino has all the best attributes of poly, but also has the added benefit of resisting stink much better. This is an important feature four days in the backcountry.

If you haven't heard of Kuiu, you should check it out. Ultralight hunting is what they are about.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 21:36
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
Mid layer - Unlike base layer I like loose fitting.  Some people like vests as mid, I Do not whether it is hot or cold conditions the wicking of sweat and body heat is best served by as many square inchs of clothing as possible. I also like it thinner/lighter than the base layer because it is always should be the first the "shed". That way it will take up the least space and the least weight to your pack plus it will dry out fast if your trying to dry it out to later in your hunt. All the companys listed so far have at least base and mid layers available.
Outer layer - I like a thinner lighter jacket because base and mid layers listed above are already doing the bulk of the work with out being heavy and bulky. Water will take heat from the human body 25 times faster than air. You don't need bulk at all if you cut the wind down first. Effective smart layering can easily cut weight in half and provide the right type of warmth and just the same cut bulk into a third. While in some cases(deals,etc.) costing you less $'s. Therefore making you a much happier hunter. Here is of what I have used.
This not camo but the tech fit price is very good. I don't use camo when I deer hunt anyways.

Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile
 
 


Edited by rustic - January/11/2012 at 21:34
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 22:14
Bitterroot Bulls View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: May/07/2009
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 3382
Midlayers:
 
My go to piece for insulating midlayer is the Patagonia R1 pullover.
 
 
This midlayer has the highest heat-to-weight ratio of any piece I have tried.  It breathes super well, and dries quickly when wet.  I have three of them.
 
I include softshells in this category.  Softshells serve as an outerlayer as well, and are waterproof in anything but a sustained downpour.  I have a Patagonia Guide jacket for general use, but prefer my Sitka 90% jacket for hunting.  Softshells breath much better than any waterproof hardshell.  Softshells also add insulating value, and even in extreme cold I rarely need more than the R1 and softshell under a hardshell.  Kuiu has a softshell available that I think I will try if I need to replace the Sitka.
 
 
For outerlayers I stay away from Gore Tex.  Gore Tex is extremely waterproof, but it is barely breathable.  I have swamped out with sweat in every Gore Tex jacket I have tried.  I recently picked up an REI Kimtah jacket with eVent fabric.  The eVent is also absolutely waterproof, but actually breathes!  I mean it.  I have worked hard in the jacket, and have never built up any signifcant moisture.  It doesn't even have pit zips, because it doesn't need them.  I have learned that the fabric in Kuiu's waterproof jacket may well be eVent, although they don't advertize it.  Again, Kuiu is on the short list for my next waterproof jacket.
 
 
I use various pants including Sitka and Cabelas, but I am looking to go to Kuiu for the breathability.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 23:13
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
Originally posted by Bitterroot Bulls Bitterroot Bulls wrote:

Midlayers:
 
My go to piece for insulating midlayer is the Patagonia R1 pullover.
 
 
This midlayer has the highest heat-to-weight ratio of any piece I have tried.  It breathes super well, and dries quickly when wet.  I have three of them.
 
I include softshells in this category.  Softshells serve as an outerlayer as well, and are waterproof in anything but a sustained downpour.  I have a Patagonia Guide jacket for general use, but prefer my Sitka 90% jacket for hunting.  Softshells breath much better than any waterproof hardshell.  Softshells also add insulating value, and even in extreme cold I rarely need more than the R1 and softshell under a hardshell.  Kuiu has a softshell available that I think I will try if I need to replace the Sitka.
 
 
For outerlayers I stay away from Gore Tex.  Gore Tex is extremely waterproof, but it is barely breathable.  I have swamped out with sweat in every Gore Tex jacket I have tried.  I recently picked up an REI Kimtah jacket with eVent fabric.  The eVent is also absolutely waterproof, but actually breathes!  I mean it.  I have worked hard in the jacket, and have never built up any signifcant moisture.  It doesn't even have pit zips, because it doesn't need them.  I have learned that the fabric in Kuiu's waterproof jacket may well be eVent, although they don't advertize it.  Again, Kuiu is on the short list for my next waterproof jacket.
 
 
I use various pants including Sitka and Cabelas, but I am looking to go to Kuiu for the breathability.
 
I am going to have to look at kuiu for outer shell. I to am not a fan of Gore Tex I much prefer gore wind stopper with water resistant spay. I also like core zips over pit zips. Did you pay full price for your sitka gear? They seem a bit high priced to me a least on the suggested retail price. I have heard good reviews on eVent especially with sleeping bag shells.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 23:22
helo18 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight
Avatar

Joined: December/02/2006
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 5431
Originally posted by cheaptrick cheaptrick wrote:

I've recently started wearing Under Armour cold weather gear on a job site in N Ohio this year. Outstanding gear! Light weight and it works as advertised. 


I have the base layer "3", but I'm sure the "4" would be that much better. 

I wear base layer 3 as well with a tshirt and long sleeve on top where I am working, and so far I have been good down to -10 as long as I am moving.  Gets too warm for me at temps above 30 though.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 23:26
helo18 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight
Avatar

Joined: December/02/2006
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 5431
Originally posted by rustic rustic wrote:

Boots - unless it is around zero or below. I like to use an uninsulated boot with a shank for reducing foot fatigue I learded this from backpacking. In the past I have used bulky heavy(cabelas or whatever) but, doing any hiking while hunting putting extra Oz's on your feet = to pounds in your pack.
I also prefer non-goretex foot wear because it really does not breathe anywhere near as well as leather/nylon/etc. with water-resistant applications.
 
Socks I like as thin as I can get by with because less material means less perspiration to deal with. I like thicker socks with gore-tex though.

wouldn't having gore-tex socks defeat the purpose of non-goretex boots?

Personally for hunting, hiking, firefighting, and out here in the oil field, I prefer smartwool.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 23:30
Bitterroot Bulls View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: May/07/2009
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 3382
Originally posted by helo18 helo18 wrote:

wouldn't having gore-tex socks defeat the purpose of non-goretex boots?

Personally for hunting, hiking, firefighting, and out here in the oil field, I prefer smartwool.


I prefer maximum breathability for my feet, so it is Smartwool for me also.

My boots use eVent. They are Kayland Vertigo Highs.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/08/2012 at 23:35
helo18 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight
Avatar

Joined: December/02/2006
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 5431
I have to have maximum breathability or my feet sweat too bad.  I won't wear insulated boots unless I am forced to sit in a stand somewhere.  I like smartwool because it lets my feet breathe, wicks the sweat away, and still keeps my feet warm even after they sweat.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/09/2012 at 00:16
Bitterroot Bulls View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: May/07/2009
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 3382
Originally posted by rustic rustic wrote:

I am going to have to look at kuiu for outer shell. I to am not a fan of Gore Tex I much prefer gore wind stopper with water resistant spay. I also like core zips over pit zips. Did you pay full price for your sitka gear? They seem a bit high priced to me a least on the suggested retail price. I have heard good reviews on eVent especially with sleeping bag shells.


eVent is awesome. I rarely pay retail for anything, and scored most of my Sitka on camofire.com. It is expensive, but no more so than similar mountaineering gear.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/09/2012 at 11:05
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
Originally posted by helo18 helo18 wrote:

Originally posted by rustic rustic wrote:

Boots - unless it is around zero or below. I like to use an uninsulated boot with a shank for reducing foot fatigue I learded this from backpacking. In the past I have used bulky heavy(cabelas or whatever) but, doing any hiking while hunting putting extra Oz's on your feet = to pounds in your pack.
I also prefer non-goretex foot wear because it really does not breathe anywhere near as well as leather/nylon/etc. with water-resistant applications.
 
Socks I like as thin as I can get by with because less material means less perspiration to deal with. I like thicker socks with gore-tex though.

wouldn't having gore-tex socks defeat the purpose of non-goretex boots?

Personally for hunting, hiking, firefighting, and out here in the oil field, I prefer smartwool.
 
Smartwool are great socks.
 
What meant was thicker socks if using gore-tex footwear.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/09/2012 at 16:39
cheaptrick View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar

Joined: September/27/2004
Location: South Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 20478
Ya'll know WAY TOO much about cold weather gear for this Southerner.....Wink

Ever consider moving...South? Big Grin


Edited by cheaptrick - January/09/2012 at 16:40
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/09/2012 at 20:34
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
Gloves - I like thin windstopper gloves in all but the most chilly conditions. These I have used down to single digits with no discomfort. http://www.manzella.com/index.php/products/detail/mz-142         There are several other good brands like(the north face, marmont,etc.) Most cases a person can find gloves cheaper at mountaineer/backpacking stores cheaper and in many cases better quality than at store like cabelas. 
On well below zero conditions I like thin breathable nylon/poly gloves under flip-over mittens with a magnetic closure. 
http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/shop/home____
 
 
Packs - I have a eberlestock backpacks they are relatively light considering how heavy of loads they are able plus the ones I have built-in scabbards. I have one pack that has a built-in scabbard and a add-on scabbard for carrying a shot gun for both antelope and upland bird hunting. These packs are made just for hunting by that I mean to pack out the meat cape and head of the animal plus gear and rifle all in the pack. I have weighed in my pack at as high just south of 110 pounds. I am sure there are other good brands out there. A good hunting pack should have internal light weight stay/stays just as all the best mountaineering/backpacking packs have. In this way I find internal framed packs far far superior to external frame packs.  http://www.eberlestock.com/

Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile


Edited by rustic - January/11/2012 at 21:34
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/09/2012 at 21:37
tahqua View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar
Have You Driven A Ford Lately?

Joined: March/27/2006
Location: Michigan, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 8047
  I have had success with capilene and the REI house brand for base layers. Mid layers; North Face, Eddie Bauer, Columbia, Cabelas and Browning have all worked just fine. I would call my King of the Mountain pants and shirt mid, but they are borderline outer. Outer layers I have tried a bunch. The most success has been with Sleeping Indian, Columbia, Filson and several sets of Cabelas. Until I get to my outer layers weight is no problem. My Sleeping Indian Anorak is outstanding, but heavy. I have Cabelas bibs, pants and parkas in both waterfowl and deer hunting versions, based on quietness. They work pretty good with a few minor complaints here or there. They are very cost effective when on sale. Same with Columbia.
 I have checked out quite a bit of the equipment mentioned and see the utility of it when on the move. I liked the Sitka quite a bit. I don't need to have the lightest weight for my type of hunting anymore. But, if I get out west again, I will update boots first. I have light weight waterproof bird hunting boots, or heavy insulated rubber and pac boots for deer and late/early season fishing. The Irish Setters would work on a mule deer hunt as well as Danners I had in the past. Forget the water and scent proof boots in the mountains. I can walk the big northern forests all day in them. In the mountains they would be a drag.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/09/2012 at 22:15
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
GPS - I have tried several GPS's but the one I settled on is http://www.garmindakota20.net/ .
It is small enough to fit in any pocket and is light as any out there. I have used it in bright sunlight and in the dark no problems what so ever. Battery life is much better than my smart phone even with rechargable AA batterys I use(eneloop http://www.eneloop.info/home/the-new-improved-eneloop.html)  Energizer Ultimate Lithium last the longest and are the lightest but, are pricey. http://www.energizer.com/batteries/ultimate-lithium/Pages/default.aspx 
 The touch screen works fine with gloves on and worked fine in the snow, rain, bitter cold and heat. It is a snap to upload GF&P's maps of huntable land I have 7 states on mine and plenty of room for more.

Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile 


Edited by rustic - January/11/2012 at 21:34
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/09/2012 at 22:23
tahqua View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar
Have You Driven A Ford Lately?

Joined: March/27/2006
Location: Michigan, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 8047
Garmin Dakota is wonderful. It has good memory and a micro card slot. It also has a USB port and touch screen. Definitley the wave of the future for hand held GPS.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/09/2012 at 23:23
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
Range finders - I have a leupold http://www.leupold.com/hunting-and-shooting/products/rangefinders/rx-1000i-with-dna-rangefinders/rx-1000i-tbr-with-dna-digital-laser-rangefinder/I  have ranged deer over six hundred yards and have not touched the battery for over a year. But this one is light, compact and super easy to use and will not bust the budget. I have not compared it to any upper end ones(Swarovski,Leica) but those are budget busters. I have used a couple nikons which were not as easy to use and the display was not as easy to read all of which were not any cheaper. Then I added this http://swfa.com/S4Gear-SideWinder-EVO-C3821.aspx so I can range let go and shot not worrying about my rangefinder it works great, the least amount time and motion possible. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pK8IGY_7Jfs 

 
Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile                         

Edited by rustic - January/11/2012 at 21:35
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/10/2012 at 01:10
Bitterroot Bulls View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: May/07/2009
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 3382
I have put some heavy loads in my Eberlestock J104. See my backpack mulie hunt video here for a pic of it loaded up:

MT Velvet Mulie

I am certain I was over 110 pounds with that load I now have a Kuiu 6000, and it has a much superior suspension to the Eberlestock. I think it will be my primary backpacking pack.

I have Sitka gloves. I have a Bushnell Elite 1500 rangefinder and have ranged elk (on the hair) over 1000 yards. I have had terrible luck with Leupold rangefinders. I have narrowed my next GPS down to the Montana or Oregon. Right now I have a Magellan, but it is not HuntingGPSmaps compatible.



Edited by Bitterroot Bulls - January/10/2012 at 01:16
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/10/2012 at 05:37
tahqua View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar
Have You Driven A Ford Lately?

Joined: March/27/2006
Location: Michigan, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 8047

I don't know how I missed that one Matt, great job.

 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/10/2012 at 11:09
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
Originally posted by Bitterroot Bulls Bitterroot Bulls wrote:

I have put some heavy loads in my Eberlestock J104. See my backpack mulie hunt video here for a pic of it loaded up:

MT Velvet Mulie

I am certain I was over 110 pounds with that load I now have a Kuiu 6000, and it has a much superior suspension to the Eberlestock. I think it will be my primary backpacking pack.

I have Sitka gloves. I have a Bushnell Elite 1500 rangefinder and have ranged elk (on the hair) over 1000 yards. I have had terrible luck with Leupold rangefinders. I have narrowed my next GPS down to the Montana or Oregon. Right now I have a Magellan, but it is not HuntingGPSmaps compatible.

 
Nice buck! Does your Kuiu 6000 have a scabbard? My brother has a Megellen and has the same problem(not HuntingGPSmaps compatible). I went with the dakota because of the compact size.
 
 
 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/10/2012 at 14:52
Bitterroot Bulls View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: May/07/2009
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 3382
My Kuiu pack does not have a scabbard, but it is pretty easy to secure a rifle with the strap system. Not as convenient as the back scabbard feature, but worth it for the better suspension, and the Kuiu saves me almost three pounds over the Eberlestock.

I do love the back scabbard, but three pounds of weight savings is more than significant.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/10/2012 at 15:20
rustic View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/30/2011
Status: Offline
Points: 1461
Originally posted by Bitterroot Bulls Bitterroot Bulls wrote:

My Kuiu pack does not have a scabbard, but it is pretty easy to secure a rifle with the strap system. Not as convenient as the back scabbard feature, but worth it for the better suspension, and the Kuiu saves me almost three pounds over the Eberlestock.

I do love the back scabbard, but three pounds of weight savings is more than significant.
 
They look like very well made packs? The loss of three pounds is very attractive for sure.
I really like not having to take my pack off to to put my rifle in and out of my scabbard though.
How is the the Kuiu for securing the animals head/cape to the pack --- easy??
Can you get to the hydration without taking everthing out of the pack?


Edited by rustic - January/10/2012 at 20:18
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  1 2 3 5>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Similar Threads: "Everything ultra-light... with in a budget"
Subject Author Forum Replies Last Post
Leupold 2.5-20 Ultra Light Magnumdood Rifle Scopes 5
Ultra Light Arms rustic Firearms 98
Leupold ultra light Muddy Buck Rifle Scopes 2
brightest low light scope!!!no budget!!! gregester Rifle Scopes 12 9/8/2007 11:56:41 PM
Lown light / low budget - possible? rapsy Rifle Scopes 8
Leupold 2x7x28mm Ultralight - Thoughts? gjw Rifle Scopes 6
Leupold Ultralights - Questions gjw Rifle Scopes 7
Only one rifle for everything??? LongShotz Rifle Scopes 7 12/17/2004 8:43:39 PM
Leupold Ultralight or Standard VXII Ruahine Rifle Scopes 1 4/11/2006 9:06:58 AM
Phase coating not everything Tero Binoculars 34 2/6/2007 10:38:12 AM


This page was generated in 0.281 seconds.