New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Collimation
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Check GunBroker.com for SWFA's No Reserve and No Minimum bid firearm auctions.

Collimation

 Post Reply Post Reply   Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/08/2015 at 14:12
holy joe View Drop Down
Optics GrassHopper
Optics GrassHopper


Joined: November/08/2015
Location: uk
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Hi, Hello to all. I have just received a pair of 7x50 OPTICAL & FILM supply co NY USA
binoculars  that are making me cross eyed because the collination  is out.Does  any body know this paticular  make and if so how do I collinate them and where are the collination screws.(I hope I am spelling collination correct.The lenses are superb so I hope  for a reply
                                                    holy joe  
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/08/2015 at 15:13
RifleDude View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar

Joined: October/13/2006
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 14313
Hi, Joe. You're close. The word you're looking for is "collimation."

I'm not familiar with those binoculars and wouldn't know who to recommend you send them to for collimation adjustment. I've never had any of my binos get out of alignment before. One of our members might be able to help you with this, though.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/20/2015 at 06:08
trancework View Drop Down
Optics GrassHopper
Optics GrassHopper


Joined: November/20/2015
Status: Offline
Points: 3
Hey Joe,
I don't know this brand, but you could check with a magnifying glass around the objective lens prism plate for a tiny screw, some are hidden beneath the cover.
Or check the objective lens for an adjustment, some have an elongated recess that the lens sits in that you can turn to collimate, you made need a lens tool to loosen the retaining lens holder.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/21/2015 at 07:03
holy joe View Drop Down
Optics GrassHopper
Optics GrassHopper


Joined: November/08/2015
Location: uk
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Hi Trancework,   Thanks for your reply I will check what you have suggested,Joe
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/23/2015 at 09:56
Klamath View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: May/20/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1267
The best you can expect from self collimation, is conditional collimation at the very best.  True collimation requires somebody who knows what they are doing and a collimation stand.  The stand projects a crosshair reticle for each of the two tubes.  The binocular tubes are then adjusted until they are as close to perfect intersection (or superimposition) as they can be gotten.

When you attempt self collimation (it is possible, but realize it is likely only possible for your eyes and at your IPD setting) you have to assume that one side if the binocular is OK, or is better than the other side.  You then have to adjust the bad side to the good side as best you can.  It is a time consuming, frustrating experience.  I know this from experience.  I will only do it on a binocular where I have no choice or that is not too valuable.

Typically collimation is done with eccentric rings which move the position of the objective lenses.  Unscrew the objective covers and you will see two rings with a notch 90* apart from each other.  The outer ring is a lock, the inner ring is for lens movement.  You will ABSOLUTELY NEED a spanner wrench which can be adjusted to the span of the collimation and lock rings.  Loosen the lock ring, or remove it, and you can then attempt collimation movement with the inner ring.  Very carefully note where you start from.  Make a movement and look to see if you moved it the correct direction.  You should use a tripod an choose something quite distant.  With some diligence you can usually figure out which is the bad side.  Make note of the image position, either high right, or low left, or whatever.  You will need to use a tripod mount to figure the initial degree of displacement.  You will need to go off the tripod to make your movement, then back on the tripod.  Repeat until you are satisfied.  Movement of the objective is usually opposite from the image displacement.  In other words to move left the lens needs to go right.

Be careful.  Rings may be sealed in place or locked in place from the passage of time.  A slip may well ruin the lens.

Note you may well also need a strap wrench to loosen the objective ring screw on cover.  A decent set of jewelers screwdrivers is a good thing too.  Google around for some repair guides, there are some out there.

A few good photos of the binocular will help.


Edited by Klamath - November/23/2015 at 10:05
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: November/23/2015 at 13:37
holy joe View Drop Down
Optics GrassHopper
Optics GrassHopper


Joined: November/08/2015
Location: uk
Status: Offline
Points: 4
Hi Klamath, After reading your write up on  Collimation I have decided  that as you say it's best left up to the experts. The 7x50 binoculars  were given to me for free so  I think I will just use them as they are.I have 2 other pairs a  pair of Pentax I bought in Canada and  my other pair I bought second hand in  my local town in the UK.
Thanks for taking the time out to reply
                                       kind regards 
                                              Joe
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Similar Threads: "Collimation"
Subject Author Forum Replies Last Post
There are no similar posts.


This page was generated in 0.500 seconds.