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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/14/2007 at 11:08
ahuebel View Drop Down
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I have seen some cleaning kits online that state they are safe to use on multi-coated lenses. This to me implies there are other cleaning solutions that are not safe. You can buy a small eyeglasses cleaner at your local pharmacy etc.. Would this be harmful? Is there any real benefit to buying such a kit?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/14/2007 at 14:14
Bird Watcher View Drop Down
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The less cleaning and rubbing that you can possibly do, the better. (some scratches are invisible until you put a flashlight onto the lenses)

Here is a list of some of the items I use for cleaning optics:

LensPen:It has a soft brush on one end and a chamois cleaning tip on the other end. The inside of the cap covering the chamois tip has a "cleaning agent" in it. These come in two sizes, the larger tip for the front objective lenses, and a smaller version for the rear eyepiece lenses. These will normally handle the majority of your cleaning needs.

Different companies also sell "Canned Air" (compressed gas duster). I get a four-pack from Costco. This is high pressure air/gas in a can, and is even better for removing dust and lint, etc. from the entire binocular. (read the directions) Don't shake it, or turn it upside down, as it will expell the propellent onto glass surfaces and require additional cleanup.

Edmund Optics sells the very best optical cleaning solution on the planet. It is recommended by people who import and sell binoculars, etc.
http://www.edmundoptics.com/onlinecatalog/search/index.cfm

Or, just type in www.edmundoptics.com and type "lens cleaner" into their search engine. They also sell lens tissue that does not scratch optics.

Always brush off or blow off your lenses "before" cleaning and polishing them. Some dirt and grit is very small to the naked eye, but, not too small to leave scratches on all your optical glass and coatings.






Edited by Bird Watcher
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/14/2007 at 14:23
Roy Finn View Drop Down
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If your a person like myself and stay on top of your optics, a LensPen works great. I got some of the Zeiss cleaning wipes from Chris here at SWFA and they work great as well. I would not use any cleaner on multi-coated sport optics that was not clearly intended for that express purpose. I kid you not, I have heard people ask if it is OK to use Rain-X on their scopes and bino's. The fumes alone from Rain-X can remove nose hair. It makes absolutely no sense to me to purchase a good set of bino's or a fine riflescope and use an unknown product on them for cleaning.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/14/2007 at 14:34
lucznik View Drop Down
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Originally posted by Roy Finn Roy Finn wrote:

If your a person like myself

 

Boy, I sure hope he is as none of the alternatives seem very pleasant

 

Originally posted by Roy Finn Roy Finn wrote:

 The fumes alone from Rain-X can remove nose hair.

 

Seriously?!?  Hmmm... I just might have to go get me some Rain-X and give that a try. Nasal Forest beware, a new weapon comes to do battle!

 

Originally posted by Roy Finn Roy Finn wrote:

It makes absolutely no sense to me to purchase a good set of bino's or a fine riflescope and use an unknown product on them for cleaning.

 

O.K. seriosly now... this is excellent advice from Roy. 

 

I agree wholeheartedly that if you are willing to spend the $$$ to get quality optics then, you should be consiencious enough to use products specifically designed to clean and protect the lenses (and their coatings) rather than going for the cheap (read: "destructive") route.  However, the fact that you asked the question in the first place, rather than just going out and getting a bottle of whatever, suggests that you already knew that.



Edited by lucznik
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/14/2007 at 14:40
Roy Finn View Drop Down
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I'll give you three guess's where that question (Rain-X) was asked. Land of Leupold loving target turreted brain surgeons.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/14/2007 at 14:43
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Roy,

You have to give them credit.....
at least they asked "before" they destroyed their optics.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/14/2007 at 14:48
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That's true, unless they were just spitballing prior to sending their optics in to the repair center and trying to remove magnesium fluoride from their finger tips.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/14/2007 at 16:10
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I second Roy's recommendation of the Zeiss cleaning wipes.  I bought a Zeiss lens cleaning kit about a year ago, and that's what I've been using for all my optics.  The kit includes a fine bristle brush to remove grit prior to cleaning, several of the wipes, Zeiss lens cleaner in a small spray bottle, and a chamois cloth.  I believe the premoistened wipes contain the same cleaner as in the spray bottle.  Regardless, both work very well.  Most of the time, I try to resist the urge to clean lenses at all unless I can visually see contaminants.  For routine cleaning that doesn't involve removing grit, simply breathing on the lens to apply slight condensation, then following up with a chamois lens cloth works well.

 

I also use the various lens pens, and they work too; I just like the Zeiss wipes and lens cleaner better.  Seems to clean better & faster than the lens pen, IMO.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/14/2007 at 16:37
anweis View Drop Down
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I have left only a few waterproof optics now, so here is how i clean them:

1. if very dirty, i squirt distilled water on the lens to float and take the dirt away - usually at home or at camp

2. dry

3. blow with canned air (when canned air not available, gas pump air for $0.50 is just as good, but keep it far away. 

4. disposable lens tissue such as Zeiss - but not the inexpensive ones sold by Wally, those leave streaks, instead, the ones that sell 21 pcs. for $6.   

 

i clean as little as possible, never use cotton, paper, lens pen - they can trap dirt and scratch. I have a few microfiber cloths that i use sparringly and only if they are extremely clean (i keep them in small ziploc bags). I've used my optics on 5 continents for intense hunting and birding for weeks at a time, and they look like new.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/15/2007 at 13:37
ahuebel View Drop Down
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Thanks for the replies. What about running them under water in the sink if dirt and grit is visible?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/15/2007 at 13:48
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Just make sure that they are 100% waterproof and not "water-resistant".   
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/15/2007 at 13:57
ahuebel View Drop Down
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Heh...of course!
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/15/2007 at 15:05
anweis View Drop Down
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Originally posted by ahuebel ahuebel wrote:

Thanks for the replies. What about running them under water in the sink if dirt and grit is visible?

 

1. if tap water in your area is rich in minerals, you will remove grit and dirt but you will have water stains left after drying. Those fine stains of solidified minerals and fine crystals may cause micro-abrasions on the coatings when you try to remove them with a cloth.

2. Even with fully waterproof binoculars, pressure form tap water may push moisture inside the binocular housings. It is better to rinse in a bucket or a pot. Presently, Leica advises against rinsing binoculars under running tap water, to avoid exposure to excessive pressure.



Edited by anweis
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/15/2007 at 15:41
FrankD View Drop Down
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Quote

Seriously?!?  Hmmm... I just might have to go get me some Rain-X and give that a try. Nasal Forest beware, a new weapon comes to do battle!

 

 

Now that one was down right funny! I think I may try just the same thing!

 

On a more serious note, I just picked up a nice cleaning pack from Vortex which includes the lens wipes, cleaning cloth and some cleaning solution that also acts as a anti-fogging agent. I have used it to clean off the lenses and it does seem to work quite well for fogging to boot!

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/20/2007 at 15:05
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I just use the Lens Pen that I got for my Canon L lens before.  It costs less than $10 to get from any camera store and works out great.  Make sure you use the brush to get rid of any visible particls on the surface, before using the soft tip to remove the smudge, otherwise, you may scratch your coating.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/20/2007 at 15:09
ahuebel View Drop Down
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I did let a friend borrow my binoculars and told him to rinse in water (before I posted this thread). Anyway, I noticed what I think are waterspots on it. They won't wipe off with just a breath and a wipe. Can't see them unless you look at an angle. anyway, I was going to use some glasses cleaning solution but I am a bit worried it may have an ill effect on the coatings. I'll buy the cleaner FrankD mentioned.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/20/2007 at 17:02
lucznik View Drop Down
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Water spots that don't come off easy sounds a bit like hard water deposits to me. 

 

 

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/20/2007 at 17:43
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If you are seeing what I think you may be seeing, you will occasionally get some of these spots on the lenses just from being in the rain and overall wet environmental conditions.  I've found the Zeiss spray lens cleaner along with a chamois lens cloth removes these spots fairly easily.
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