New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Bedding Actions
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Check GunBroker.com for SWFA's No Reserve and No Minimum bid firearm auctions.

Bedding Actions

 Post Reply Post Reply   Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options Page  1 2 3>
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 14:07
helo18 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight
Avatar

Joined: December/02/2006
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 5431
I am looking at trying my hand at bedding the action on my 270.  Is it easy to do on your own?  Any tips?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 16:16
cheaptrick View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar

Joined: September/27/2004
Location: South Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 20472
I did my Rem. 700 synthetic a few years ago. Very easy.
I bought a kit off of Brownells, I think.
 
Follow the directions and use plenty 'o' release and you'll be fine. 
Good luck!
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 16:25
Focus View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar
Conquistador!!

Joined: June/05/2007
Location: Maine
Status: Offline
Points: 1006
Savage and remington tube style actions are very easy and as CT said a kit from brownells or somewhere would be the place to start.

Focus
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 16:45
helo18 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight
Avatar

Joined: December/02/2006
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 5431
I have a brownells kit.  I am trying to use it on a mauser 98 military action.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 17:07
RONK View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: April/05/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 3199
 
 It's fairly easy, but if you goof up you will regret even attempting it!
 Read the directions twice before you start, set up a roomy work area with very good lighting, and recruit a helper the first time you do one, and you'll get geat results!
 Check it frequently as it cures so if a bit of the epoxy runs into someplace it shouldn't, you can remove it before it sets up. I like the gel kits better than the liquid ones, it stays in place a lot better. If you already have the liquid kit, just keep it cool, and it will stay put well, but take longer to cure.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 17:18
Duce View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/19/2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1231
Here is a good article by a real pro, I have used it and it works great & like CT said don`t forget to use plenty of release.
 
Duce Super
 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 17:42
Focus View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar
Conquistador!!

Joined: June/05/2007
Location: Maine
Status: Offline
Points: 1006
Release and clay are two important things to use.......the action can seem tight the first time you remove it from the stock. Remember to put a couple layers of tape around anything that you want to have a little clearance when the job is done.

Focus
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 17:46
RONK View Drop Down
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Optics Master Extraordinaire
Avatar

Joined: April/05/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 3199
Originally posted by Duce Duce wrote:

Here is a good article by a real pro, I have used it and it works great & like CT said don`t forget to use plenty of release.
 
Duce Super
 
 
 That was an excellent link, Duce!  I only got through part of it so far, but it's obvious that that guy REALLY knows what he is doing!  Thank you for posting it. Looks like I may have to reconsider Acraglass vs. Devcon for the next one I do, among other things.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 17:57
helo18 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight
Avatar

Joined: December/02/2006
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 5431
Good link, Duce.  Learning alot here.  Wish I could have you guys around to help.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 18:03
RifleDude View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar

Joined: October/13/2006
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 14313
The most important thing to a good bedding job is the prep work BEFORE you ever mix the epoxy.  Bedding isn't hard to do, but there's a big difference between bedding an action and PROPERLY bedding an action.  The latter just requires a little attention to detail and careful prep work.  It is important to fill in any crevices in the action or otherwise mask these areas off to prevent the epoxy from being forced into areas where it may mechanically lock the action in the stock.  I use modeling clay as filler material and also as "dams" to prevent epoxy from traveling in areas of the stock I don't want it to, like too far into the barrel channel forward of the front of the action.  As CT said, use plenty of release agent on the metal, take your time, and read the instructions CAREFULLY.  The stuff is strong, and if you make a big mistake, you can permanently glue your action into the stock. 
 
One thing I also always do is rough up the action inletting surfaces inside the stock where the bedding material will go with a Dremel tool so the epoxy will adhere to the stock better.  I always tape off the front, sides, and bottom of the recoil lug to provide a small amount of clearance for removing the stock.  The back side -- the bearing surface -- is the only part of the recoil lug that actually should be touching the bedding.  It's a good idea to go ahead and remove the trigger group before bedding so that no epoxy will be squeezed into the trigger components, potentially locking it up.
 
I also wrap electrical tape several times around the barrel so it helps center the barrel in the barrel channel and provides support to the barrel's weight while the epoxy cures.  NEVER tighten the action screws while the epoxy sets, because you will impart stress on the action, and the epoxy will conform to the stressed action so that the action will be under stress when you later torque it into your new bedding job.  Simply press the action into the bedding as far as it will go, loosely installing the action screws just so epoxy doesn't squeeze into the screw holes in the bottom of the action.  Of course, don't forget to thoroughly coat the screws with release compound as well.  A stressed bedding job will hurt accuracy.  To test whether your bedding is stressed, attach a dial indicator base to the forend of the stock, with the indicator probe touching the barrel.  The indicator should not move more than about 0.003" or so when you tighten and loosen the action screws.  If you do have a stressed bedding job, roughen up the surface of the bedding and add another skim coat of epoxy onto the cured bedding and press the action back in the stock.
 
Before adding epoxy into the stock, mask off the top edges of the stock next to the inletting with electrical tape so it makes it easier to clean off the excess epoxy that squeezes out the top of the stock without risking getting some smeared on the stock finish that you don't notice until after it has cured.  When the epoxy does squeeze out between the stock and action... and it will... use a plastic knife, popsicle stick, or similar object to scrape off the excess epoxy, but wait until the epoxy is starting to become "tacky" so it will ball up better.  Follow-up with a paper towel with a little alcohol or vinegar to clean up any excess that smears onto the side of the action.  Once you have it all cleaned up and no more epoxy is squeezing out between action and stock, remove the tape you used for masking the top edge of the stock.
 
Then, let the rifle sit undisturbed in some sort of cradle overnight.  It can be removed from the stock in about 12 hours or so, but I would wait 2 days for total cure before firing the rifle.  If the stock is difficult to remove, as it often can be, with one hand grabbing the barrel, the other grabbing the stock, try to wiggle the two to see if you can work the action & stock apart.  If that doesn't work, get a WOODEN dowel (so you don't mar the metal finish) and insert into the magazine well opening in the stock to contact some flat surface of the action, such as the bolt race or edge of the magazine cutout.  Using the dowel as a punch, tap it with a rubber mallet, gently at first, then smartly until the action starts to seperate from the stock.  Usually the action will pop loose from the stock with a few good smacks from the mallet.  Be careful not to miss the dowel and hit the stock with the mallet.  If it still won't come loose, try heating up the action with a blow dryer, occasionally stopping to try prying the action loose.  Heating the action will sometimes help release the steel from the epoxy due to slight differential expansion.  If that doesn't work, find a freezer large enough to accept the rifle and keep it in there a few hours.  The differential contraction will usually release the action from the bedding.
 
Once you remove the stock, grind off the excess bedding that manages to run into the magazine recess with a Dremel tool and drill out the epoxy that ran into the screw holes of the stock so the action screws don't contact the bedding and create secondary recoil lugs.  It is important for best accuracy that the recoil lug alone and nothing else bears the rearward thrust from recoil.
 
As for what areas to bed, I have found it's best to bed only the portion of the action in front of the magazine in the recoil lug area (and maybe the first 1.5" - 2" of barrel forward of the action before it tapers down) and the small area of the tang just behind the trigger assy, where the rear action screw contacts the action and not worry about the small area on the sides of the action in the center near the magazine cutout.  This is assuming you have an action with a magazine.  For a single shot bolt action with a solid bottom, bed the entire bottom of the action. 
 
I usually also pillar bed actions when I do a bedding job, but that's difficult to describe here, and, though beneficial, isn't necessary to a good bedding job.  Pillar bedding just prevents the action screws from compressing the stock material when the screws are torqued.
 
Hope all this makes sense -- it's really simpler than it sounds, but it's just hard to describe in writing.  Sorry for the length of this post, but not everything that makes for a good bedding job is covered in the bedding instructions. 
 
Good luck!Big%20Smile


Edited by RifleDude - January/02/2008 at 18:11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 18:15
Duce View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar

Joined: September/19/2006
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 1231
Good advice from Rifledude prep and inletting are what makes a good job, get everything ready and check it before you mix the epoxy. If you need to rush don't do it,Smile put it off till you have time to do it  right.
 
Duce
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 18:51
Focus View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar
Conquistador!!

Joined: June/05/2007
Location: Maine
Status: Offline
Points: 1006
Quote I usually also pillar bed actions when I do a bedding job, but that's difficult to describe here, and, though beneficial, isn't necessary to a good bedding job. Pillar bedding just prevents the action screws from compressing the stock material when the screws are torqued.


Thats what I call a "skim bed" job when working around the pillars when bedding the action, all the savages I do are like this. I prefer my actions pillared and bedded. Ted gives some great step by step advise. Let us know how it turns out.

Focus

Edited by Focus - January/02/2008 at 18:53
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 19:15
helo18 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight
Avatar

Joined: December/02/2006
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 5431
RifleDude, could you explain more in detail, the process of using the clay on the action?  I just want to make sure I totally understand that part.  Do you just add clay to the spots that you can obviously see need it, or do you put clay on the whole thing and the scrape down to the metal only leaving clay to smooth the whole thing?
 
Also, how much more work does it take to do the pillars?  And how much does it benefit the accuracy?  I am shooting 1/2" groups right now, but would like to make sure the action is totally set in the stock since I did the stock myself.  Just hoping to take care of any imperfections in the inletting.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 21:08
RifleDude View Drop Down
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Avatar

Joined: October/13/2006
Location: Texas
Status: Offline
Points: 14313
Originally posted by helo18 helo18 wrote:

RifleDude, could you explain more in detail, the process of using the clay on the action?  I just want to make sure I totally understand that part.  Do you just add clay to the spots that you can obviously see need it, or do you put clay on the whole thing and the scrape down to the metal only leaving clay to smooth the whole thing?
 
Also, how much more work does it take to do the pillars?  And how much does it benefit the accuracy?  I am shooting 1/2" groups right now, but would like to make sure the action is totally set in the stock since I did the stock myself.  Just hoping to take care of any imperfections in the inletting.
 
I press the clay into all recesses where epoxy might end up getting locked into, then wipe the excess clay from the metal surrounding the filled recess.  Then, I apply the release agent over everything, clay and all.  I only press the clay into the visible "problem areas" like grooves, setscrew holes, dovetail slots, etc that have the potential to cause a mechanical lock with the epoxy, not on any other surface of the action.  I also it to make little "dams" in the stock to prevent the epoxy from migrating past areas where I want it to stop.
 
Pillars don't really improve accuracy; they MAINTAIN the bedding's existing accuracy potential by preventing stock/bedding crush from screw torque, thereby maintaining consistent screw torque.  The pillars are not hard to install.  I either buy the premachined aluminum pillars like the Parrish or Holland pillar kits that have the o.d. grooves, or I machine my own out of aluminum or brass.  Turn the o.d. of the pillars 9/16" or so, with a 7mm i.d. hole for the screws.  I like having the grooves on the o.d. so it grabs the epoxy well.  Drill out the existing screw holes in the stock using a piloted Forstner bit that cuts a 9/16" dia hole.  The piloted bit will follow the existing holes in the stock for perfect alignment.  If the existing screw holes aren't large enough for the Forstner bit pilot, drill it to the required i.d. on a drill press first.  Measure the hole depth with the depth blade of a caliper and cut the pillars a couple thou longer than that depth.  Screw the pillars loosely against the bottom of the action, coat thoroughly with epoxy, align the pillars into the drilled holes in the stock, and press the assembly down into the stock.  In this case, after the action is fully seated in the stock you DO want to go ahead and torque the action screws, because you aren't stressing the bedding with the pillars in place since the pillars are floating in the stock holes until the bedding sets up.  You're just sandwiching them hard against the action to prevent epoxy from squeezing its way between the top of the pillar and the bottom of the action and properly aligning the pillars with the holes and the action.  You can bed the action at the same time you install the pillars if you know what you're doing, or you can install the pillars, then proceed with the rest of the bedding. 
 
Hope this makes sense.  There are many different ways to accomplish the same thing, and different people use different techniques with equal success.  What I've described is what works for me personally, the result of much experimentation arrived at after bedding many rifles and comparing notes with others whose work I respect.
 
If you're getting an honest 1/2MOA accuracy from a hunting rifle, I wouldn't fool with a thing, unless suddenly accuracy deteriorates and you suspect inconsistent screw torque is the culprit.


Edited by RifleDude - January/02/2008 at 21:11
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/02/2008 at 22:38
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight


Joined: July/04/2004
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 5087
and don't forget to put vaseline in all the holes!!!
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/03/2008 at 07:46
Focus View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar
Conquistador!!

Joined: June/05/2007
Location: Maine
Status: Offline
Points: 1006
As a young man somebody told me that......can't remember if it had to do with bedding though......

Focus
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/03/2008 at 08:37
Dolphin View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master


Joined: October/05/2006
Location: North Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 1795
Curious, what type of groups are you getting with your rifle now?  What type of stock is on the rifle, an old military stock or an updated sporter in wood or synthetic?

Edited by Dolphin - January/03/2008 at 08:39
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/03/2008 at 11:44
helo18 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight
Avatar

Joined: December/02/2006
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 5431
I am currently shooting 1/2" groups at 100 yards.  The action is a mauser 98 military matched to a 270 barrel by voure arms in austria in 1968.  Between that time and the time my Dad bought me the gun in 1993, I don't know much about the gun other than the stock had been cracked and repaired right before I got it.  I broke the old stock (sporter style i think) in 2005 in a horse accident.
 
The new stock is a laminated walnut thunbhole dual grip.  Most of the prep work was done by eld ridge in grants pass oregon.  I did all of the final fitting of the action, barrel, trigger, and guard.  The actio fits fairly snug, and the recoil lug is the tightest area.  Here are a few pics.
 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/07/2008 at 12:41
Dolphin View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master


Joined: October/05/2006
Location: North Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 1795

Shooting 1/2 inch goups at 100 yards.  I am not sure I would even want to mess with the rifle.  No guarantee that it will shoot better or even the same.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/07/2008 at 15:05
Focus View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar
Conquistador!!

Joined: June/05/2007
Location: Maine
Status: Offline
Points: 1006
No doubt it has a pretty good barrel on it. Sorry guys but I much prefer pillars and a good bedding job myself for the same fit each time you remove the action and replace it. The pillars prevent slowly crushing the stock a little different each time you tighten the guard screws. I don't think it will loose accuracy but do think it will become much more repeatable after teardowns and cleanings. Is the barrel floated now or does it have a pressure bump towards the front? Some euros use the pressure point and tune the barrel harmonics with it. That would in fact have a bearing on future accuracy if bedded.

Focus
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/07/2008 at 15:42
helo18 View Drop Down
Optics Jedi Knight
Optics Jedi Knight
Avatar

Joined: December/02/2006
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 5431
The barrel is free floated.  Had a bump on the old stock and I couldn't get consistent groups, so I free floated it, and the accuracy came down to what it is now.  Now it has a new stock, but the accuracy hasn't changed.  I would like to be it, just to make sure the action fits correctly and the recoil lug is taking all the recoil and not other parts of the action.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/07/2008 at 15:54
Focus View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master
Avatar
Conquistador!!

Joined: June/05/2007
Location: Maine
Status: Offline
Points: 1006
Hearing that news I would recommend to at least bed it but I'm also a big fan of pillars also. I doubt it will change the accuracy if the barrel is floated. Good shooting and luck in your endeavor. I also don't know what its like where you are but up here you can get a decent accuracy gunsmith to bed your rifle for about $75. Not really much to spend at all in my opinion.

Focus

Edited by Focus - January/07/2008 at 15:56
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/07/2008 at 16:11
Dolphin View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master


Joined: October/05/2006
Location: North Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 1795
Good points focus.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/07/2008 at 16:14
sinsir View Drop Down
Optics Apprentice
Optics Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: March/02/2007
Status: Offline
Points: 75
just my $.02 - i've only done 2 bedding jobs, both with good results. listen to rifle dude !! use the clay to dam up, or block where ya don't want the epoxy, and use plenty of the release agent .. coat it let it dry, coat it again, let that dry, and coat it again ... no kidding, the epoxy is tough as nails, better safe then sorry. most important - take your time, the better the prep, the better the results
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/07/2008 at 16:58
Dolphin View Drop Down
Optics Master
Optics Master


Joined: October/05/2006
Location: North Carolina
Status: Offline
Points: 1795
I will be curious to see how your rifle shoots after bedding.  I just thought about it, but your rifle is a Mauser, which means the recoil lug has the front bedding screw integrated into it, which means you cannot pillar bed the recoil lug.  I would be hesitant to pillar bed the rear only.
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  1 2 3>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Similar Threads: "Bedding Actions"
Subject Author Forum Replies Last Post
Nikon Action or Action EX 10x50 CWPINST Binoculars 4 1/3/2006 7:28:06 PM
Bedding two-piece rings tsvalli Rings and bases 4
Bedding screws Glock Firearms 9
Glass Bedding 700 SPS in a B&C Stock EAGLE Firearms 15
Bedding 2-piece base on Rem 700 LA dpilot83 Rings and bases 0
Epoxy putty for bedding base. Buster95 Rings and bases 2
BARREL BEDDING / TABOO? hot30 Firearms 29 10/3/2007 1:09:28 AM
Rem 700 VSF -Need to bed action? 8shots Firearms 21
About bedding basses... Harriershot Rifle Scopes 16
Glass bedding? trigger29 Firearms 12


This page was generated in 0.250 seconds.