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Rancid Coolaid View Drop Down
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A friend recently decided to get into bow hunting (since the season for deer begins 1.5months prior to rifle season.)

I have an old Bear Kodiak Magnum from my youth.  It's a recurve rather than a compound and I am considering going to a compound hunter.

This is a purist bow.

Anyone else bow hunt?  What do you use and why?  When it comes to bow hunting, I know next to nothing, so I am way over tot he extreme of this knowledge curve.

Any helpful hints or thoughts are welcomed.
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I bowhunt quite a bit and used to shoot 3D archery tournaments frequently a few years ago.  See my post in your other thread on this topic and feel free to ask any question you wish.
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I also responded to your other thread.
I can't compete with single cam, overdraw bows on a 3D course. I became so frustrated when shooting against them I installed sight inserts on my Black Widow MAII.
I accept the limitations of thirty yard shots and I feel far more comfortable with my stick bows now, though. I have even gone back to instinctive shooting with my MAII.
New compounds shoot extremely flat they are so fast. They are also heavy and awkward to carry in the woods, IMO. I think that if you are stand hunting that you might be happier with a wheel bow. If you practice a lot and travel far on the ground while hunting, the stick is much better.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/11/2008 at 20:41
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Originally posted by tahqua tahqua wrote:

I also responded to your other thread.
I can't compete with single cam, overdraw bows on a 3D course. I became so frustrated when shooting against them I installed sight inserts on my Black Widow MAII.
I accept the limitations of thirty yard shots and I feel far more comfortable with my stick bows now, though. I have even gone back to instinctive shooting with my MAII.
New compounds shoot extremely flat they are so fast. They are also heavy and awkward to carry in the woods, IMO. I think that if you are stand hunting that you might be happier with a wheel bow. If you practice a lot and travel far on the ground while hunting, the stick is much better.
 
 
 
RC, Depending on your instinctive shooting aptitude your thought of going compound may be your best option. If you show some natural ability for instinctive shooting you will get tremendous satisfaction in developing that skill. I shoot well instinctive but I am not satisfied with the odds. I mean with my recurve I may pull 3 to 4 shots off the bulls eye about 4 inches, and to me that's not good enough. 4+ inches could mean a miss or cut over, under or infront of a deer. Or worse a gut shot. With my compound a pulled shot might be 2 inches and I might pull that bad 1 in 10. If you go compound I suggest going all the way. That means a decent bow in the 300.00 range and a release and if you can afford it a range finder that will range to 400yds. Might as well be able to use it with the muzzle loader and rifle also. Some will say don't spend that much on a bow but you risk getting a bad bow and a bad experience. If you decide later that the bow isn't for you you can recoupe some of your money on ebay. The point is the give yourself every chance to enjoy the hunt and that means scoring on what ever you choose to hunt. Some thoughts on practicing is be sure to use field points that match your broadhead weight. Be sure to use the same arrows, all alum, graphite or carbon and all the same shaft weight. I recommend a release that wraps around your wrist ( less problems in the stand). Talk to several bow hunters or really listen to more and decide which one practices what he preaches and is very successful with it. Then let that one be your source for answers and suggestions. Buy a pack of "judo points ( in the same weight as your broadheads), just search ebay and you will see what they are and get a decent price. Then if you have access to some open fields or disked land just walk the edge and pick a target. Judge the distance or hit it with the range finder and shoot it. This is very effective practice. There is a book load of info to help you with but this might help you to a good start. Let us know how things go! Thunbs%20Up
 
 
 
+1
 
Well put tahqua, However the compound being akward would depend on preference. I like my jennings recurve but my field oppertunity is sometimes so unpredictable I have elected to hunt with my compound because of shot distance and consistant accuracy. Unfortunatly my instinctive abilities have suffered for it. I do a fair amount of ground stalking also and have overcome any issues that made me prefer the recurve. (except the satisfaction of a scoring a dead-on shot!) Ofcourse I am very happy with a score with my compound, it's just very similar to scoring with my rifle. I know it's a kill unless something very unpredictable happens or I'm just careless. I encourage any experienced bow hunter to do something that I was opposed to at one time.
We all have that sweet spot distance that we hope our target will step into. Mine used to be 20yds. and 30 was my max even with the compound. When I had saved some money for my dream bow The Hoyt Havoc I had also pledged to myself to take an advanced shooting class with a former Browning (bow) enginieer and compitition shooter who had once told me that "Practice DOES NOT make perfect, but Perfect practice DOES MAKE PERFECT". He told me that I was an above average shot but that I had some shooting form habits that needed to be corrected. The best fifty bucks I've spent on bow hunting. One lesson and learning what I was doing away from perfect practice and my shot consistancy and confidence tripled.
(The part I had a problem with at first! Beyond that he gave me a morsal of wisdom that gave a great boost to my effective range. He said to start shooting to the max range my bow was capable of. I was suprised at first because I considered that unethical, but then he clarified. "I didn't say shoot game that far, I said find that range and shoot out to that distance in practice". Then he explained that in practicing out to 70 to
90yds. in 10yd. incriments I would become a better judge of distance and when I became confident in shooting 80yds. then a 40 or 50yd. shot will not be guessing anymore. Now my sweet spot is 50yds. and with the Havoc the speed and quitness set at 62lbs. is very effective. And if I wanted to I could shoot out to 60yds. but that extra 10yds. has tremendous effect on speed and trajectory. So 60yds. is not good for my bow because the deers potential movement is magnified beyond what I feel is ethical. Your preferred max range may stay at 30 or 40 but I am certain that your confidance and consistancy will improve.
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Originally posted by Rancid Coolaid Rancid Coolaid wrote:

A friend recently decided to get into bow hunting (since the season for deer begins 1.5months prior to rifle season.)

I have an old Bear Kodiak Magnum from my youth.  It's a recurve rather than a compound and I am considering going to a compound hunter.

This is a purist bow.

Anyone else bow hunt?  What do you use and why?  When it comes to bow hunting, I know next to nothing, so I am way over tot he extreme of this knowledge curve.

Any helpful hints or thoughts are welcomed.
 
 
 
 
Rancid Coolaid
 
I wanted to add that the Bear or PSE line is a good place to start for your first bow because of price and even if you can afford Matthews, Hoyt, Browning ect. They tend to be somewhat temprimental and unforgiving AND high mantainance. I might go two yrs. on a string for my Hoyt but if money allows I'll change every yr. The bear bows I 've had, shoot good, they are forgiving and are low mantainance. Plus if you have kids or nephews you can have something to help them start. Good Luck!
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I haven't found a current flagship model bow from any of the major manufacturers to be high maintenance at all.  They are all very dependable, and I find I change strings every 2 years or so with no problems.  IMO, gone are the days where you had to work on a compound bow constantly.  Current vintage compounds are all CNC machined, use good bearings on the cams/idler wheels, limb pockets are more solid and secure, and limb construction has improved to the point that failure is very rare.  Even string and cable materials have advanced to the point that they last a long time.  I never do anything to mine other than wax the strings and replace strings when they start getting frayed.  Compound bows have progressed to the point that they are pretty bulletproof these days, at least the good ones are.  The better compound bows will cost over $500 new.  If you spend less than that, it's best to look for a top of the line used model in good condition rather than buying a less expensive new bow.  Used bows don't retain their value well, which is a good thing if you're a buyer.
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   Another point to make is that just because you shoot a high tech compound doesn't mean you have to go high tech in all your equipment. I finger shoot a Mathews Conquest Pro I bought in 99 that was used one year for $500($720new).  Other than a NAP Flipper rest,a fiber optic sight w/5 pins,and a small quiver w/2 extra arrows,the bow is bare. No peep sight,stabilizer,string silencers,etc. At the house I've got a 0 to 60yd range set up w/a stationary bag plus a 12' ladder stand that I shoot from at a Black Hole target I move around . Don't think you can't be accurate with a bow with the minimum accessories on it. When I was shooting alot of 3D I was consistantly scoring in the upper 180s to lower 190s on a 200 pt range. Not a thing wrong with a completely tricked out bow if you get it right and leave it alone. The guys I would beat at 3D with set ups like that were the ones who were constantly changing accessories or altering what they had. The main thing about archery that differs from firearms is that your archery equipment has got to fit you to a tee. If it doesn't you'll not only be inaccurate but will get frustrated  to the point of giving up and missing out on,to me,the most rewarding type of hunting there is.
 
til later
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I too bowhunt and 3-D, and have done so for over 30 years. I've slowed a lot lately due to osteo-arthritis in my hands, but shooting is still doable (with some pain). There are so many good bows out there now it's unreal. I've had / shot Darton, Jennings, Martin, Oneida, Mathews, PSE, Bear, Parker and Hoyt. All were good. Most were compunds, but a couple were recurve traditionals. None were particularly difficult to work on and tune. My current is a 6 year old Hoyt that still drills em'. The new PSE's look great...short and light weight. There are several other new models worth investigating. Just like guns, try them out for fit and feel. The better Archery Pro Shops usually have trial bows set up to play with. Visit some local clubs and ranges. Often times folks there are more than happy to assist and allow others to give their equipment a try. Once you get repeatable form and muscle memory you're good to go. Then just practice a lot. I usually see a lot more deer during archery season than gun season though. Good luck. 
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Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

I haven't found a current flagship model bow from any of the major manufacturers to be high maintenance at all.  They are all very dependable, and I find I change strings every 2 years or so with no problems.  IMO, gone are the days where you had to work on a compound bow constantly.  Current vintage compounds are all CNC machined, use good bearings on the cams/idler wheels, limb pockets are more solid and secure, and limb construction has improved to the point that failure is very rare.  Even string and cable materials have advanced to the point that they last a long time.  I never do anything to mine other than wax the strings and replace strings when they start getting frayed.  Compound bows have progressed to the point that they are pretty bulletproof these days, at least the good ones are.  The better compound bows will cost over $500 new.  If you spend less than that, it's best to look for a top of the line used model in good condition rather than buying a less expensive new bow.  Used bows don't retain their value well, which is a good thing if you're a buyer.
 
 
RifleDude, I agree with you however, we have to remind ourselves that RC has little experience with all the options available and maybe even the value of keeping the string waxed. I'm also concerned about low or no mantainance bows. Do you have to adjust your sights before each new season on the same string? If not I need to know what kind of strings you use. If you record the wheel axle to wheel axle distance before each season, don't you find that the string has stretched? Also unless you never hunt in wet weather ( I'm sure you do) even the best components will rust and effect function. So unless you are confortable breaking down your bow and cleaning and greasing the parts I recommend letting a experienced tech or friend do it and show you how. And while your at it change the string if it shows evidence of stretch. This can be expensive on any bow, but especially on high end bows if the bow tech doesn't give you a break.
 
At some point RC will want to know about sights, rests, peep sights, realeases vs fingers bow weight, string pull weight and so forth. We all have our fav's and stuff we think is useless. As I might recommend 6 pins for practice and 3 for hunting or a pendulem sight for starters, but someone else would say I'm crazy. I used to recommend used bows, but now only if the buyer has an experienced archer with him to trouble shoot the bow. Even a great used mattews can have subtle or even obvious damage that a new commer would miss. I know more than a few bow hunters who wouldn't catch dry fire damage if you told them the bow had it. At least with out pointing at it.
 
If any of you haven't taken your bow down in years, it is very likely you have some rust issues. Even spraying the wheels and axles with oil doesn't assure prevention as I found out the hard way. Oil is temperary, grease is your friend ( unless in a fine sand enviroment) then it's a grinding compound.
 
I'm excited for you RC. Your starting something that can bring you a great deal of satisfaction. BUT! Be patient and open minded with your learning and pick a direction and stick with it for at least 2 dozen pratice sessions. Pratice as often as possible, I've hunted bow for over 25 yrs. and shoot everyday I can. That also has something to do with how often you replace parts. If you only pratice just before season then you aren't imposing much wear. Let us know what your first bow is and Good Luck.
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I use Kevlar Fast-Flite strings on my stick bows since they are modern. Even these stretch over time but the most I have seen is an 1/8" over several years. I keep them strung through the fall when I am practicing and hunting, BTW.
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Originally posted by tahqua tahqua wrote:

I use Kevlar Fast-Flite strings on my stick bows since they are modern. Even these stretch over time but the most I have seen is an 1/8" over several years. I keep them strung through the fall when I am practicing and hunting, BTW.
 
 
 
Back when I only praticed the month before season I thought about leaving my compound in a field cable press to prevent stretch. But never tried it. I do keep my recurve unstrung when it's likely to set for more that a few weeks. I have my Dad's Blackwidow now and plan to some day take a deer with it in his honor. That is when I man up enough to take it out of the case. It is an awesome bow!
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Originally posted by Sgt. D Sgt. D wrote:

 
I'm also concerned about low or no mantainance bows. Do you have to adjust your sights before each new season on the same string? If not I need to know what kind of strings you use. If you record the wheel axle to wheel axle distance before each season, don't you find that the string has stretched? Also unless you never hunt in wet weather ( I'm sure you do) even the best components will rust and effect function. So unless you are confortable breaking down your bow and cleaning and greasing the parts I recommend letting a experienced tech or friend do it and show you how. And while your at it change the string if it shows evidence of stretch. This can be expensive on any bow, but especially on high end bows if the bow tech doesn't give you a break.
 
At some point RC will want to know about sights, rests, peep sights, realeases vs fingers bow weight, string pull weight and so forth. We all have our fav's and stuff we think is useless. As I might recommend 6 pins for practice and 3 for hunting or a pendulem sight for starters, but someone else would say I'm crazy. I used to recommend used bows, but now only if the buyer has an experienced archer with him to trouble shoot the bow. Even a great used mattews can have subtle or even obvious damage that a new commer would miss. I know more than a few bow hunters who wouldn't catch dry fire damage if you told them the bow had it. At least with out pointing at it.
 
 
Yes, I have to adjust my sights every now and then, but not very often, certainly not during each new shooting session.  Usually, even after weeks of no use, I pull out my bow and it's dead on!  There is no string material that never moves at all, but the current strings I use come darn close!  I record the axle to axle length, tiller, and nocking height when I initially setup the bow after replacing strings, and after a string is "shot in," I haven't found much, if any change at all.  Yes, there is some stretch and creep over time, but not enough that it requires any maintenance other than sight adjustment, which again, doesn't happen very often.  About once a year I may have to put it in the bow press and twist the string a couple times to compensate, but that's no big deal.  I remember very well when this wasn't the case, but string materials have improved so much since the early Fast Flight days.  I don't even use any kind of peep alignment string or rubber band, as again, once my strings are fully "shot in," my peep sight alignment stays pretty constant.
 
I use Winner's Choice strings and cables, which is made of BCY 8125 material.
Once I shoot a new string & cable a couple hundred times, it stays pretty stable from then on until I need to replace it, which is generally after about 2 years of use. 
 
I use Tetra Bow lube on my axles and any steel or moving parts, but on my current hunting bow, Mathews Drenalin, there's not many steel parts there to rust except for a few screws and the axles and everything that is, including the limb bolts, is accessible enough for the Tetra lube.  Everything else is either aluminum or polymers.  I have a bow press, so I can address rust if it is ever a problem, but I've never had any issues with rust.  The Mathews uses sealed bearings on the cam and idler wheel, and I'm pretty sure the axles are stainless steel.
 
I totally agree with you that RC should seek the guidance of a good archery shop when selecting a bow.  There are so many things to consider that it's pretty much impossible to convey here.  I do believe it's a better plan to get started by selecting a high end used bow than a lower end new bow since bows don't retain their value well and there are many people who start out buying a top of the line bow, get frustrated with archery because they didn't get the poper guidance and sell their bow after little use.  Finding a good archery pro shop is invaluable for getting started and will help you to avoid common mistakes with equipment selection and shooting form.  I don't even want to get started on discussions of target panic, which is a complex topic all by itself!Wink
 
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Originally posted by RifleDude 
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>I use Winner's Choice strings and cables, which is made of BCY 8125 material.</DIV>
<DIV><a href=http://www.winnerschoicestrings.com/home1.htm target=_blank>http://www.winnerschoicestrings.com/home1.htm</A></DIV>
<DIV>Once I shoot a new string & cable a couple hundred times, it stays pretty stable from then on until I need to replace it, which is generally after about 2 years of use.  </DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>I use Tetra Bow lube on my axles and any steel or moving parts, but on my current hunting bow, Mathews Drenalin, there's not many steel parts there to rust except for a few screws and the axles and everything that is, including the limb bolts, is accessible enough for the Tetra lube.  Everything else is either aluminum or polymers.  I have a bow press, so I can address rust if it is ever a problem, but I've never had any issues with rust.  The Mathews uses sealed bearings on the cam and idler wheel, and I'm pretty sure the axles are stainless steel.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>I totally agree with you that RC should seek the guidance of a good archery shop when selecting a bow.  There are so many things to consider that it's pretty much impossible to convey here.  I do believe it's a better plan to get started by selecting a high end used bow than a lower end new bow since bows don't retain their value well and there are many people who start out buying a top of the line bow, get frustrated with archery because they didn't get the poper guidance and sell their bow after little use.  Finding a good archery pro shop is invaluable for getting started and will help you to avoid common mistakes with equipment selection and shooting form.  I don't even want to get started on discussions of target panic, which is a complex topic all by itself!<img src=smileys/Wink.gif height=17 width=17 border=0 alt=Wink /></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>[/QUOTE RifleDude
 
I use Winner's Choice strings and cables, which is made of BCY 8125 material.
Once I shoot a new string & cable a couple hundred times, it stays pretty stable from then on until I need to replace it, which is generally after about 2 years of use. 
 
I use Tetra Bow lube on my axles and any steel or moving parts, but on my current hunting bow, Mathews Drenalin, there's not many steel parts there to rust except for a few screws and the axles and everything that is, including the limb bolts, is accessible enough for the Tetra lube.  Everything else is either aluminum or polymers.  I have a bow press, so I can address rust if it is ever a problem, but I've never had any issues with rust.  The Mathews uses sealed bearings on the cam and idler wheel, and I'm pretty sure the axles are stainless steel.
 
I totally agree with you that RC should seek the guidance of a good archery shop when selecting a bow.  There are so many things to consider that it's pretty much impossible to convey here.  I do believe it's a better plan to get started by selecting a high end used bow than a lower end new bow since bows don't retain their value well and there are many people who start out buying a top of the line bow, get frustrated with archery because they didn't get the poper guidance and sell their bow after little use.  Finding a good archery pro shop is invaluable for getting started and will help you to avoid common mistakes with equipment selection and shooting form.  I don't even want to get started on discussions of target panic, which is a complex topic all by itself!Wink
 
[/QUOTE wrote:


 
 
 
 
+1    +1    +1    +1    +1
 
That is the price I am paying for sticking with an aging bow. And I figured the newer bows were getting away from rustable components. I had heard recently that there was a matthews string that would fit my hoyt and was far less apt to need attention. A buddy has hunted matthews for 3yrs now and is going to something on this yrs line. I don't know which one yet, but I'm expecting it to be a great bow. I like this havoc so well that I'm not considering anything new for a while longer. It'll never be a compitition shooter but it's deadly in the right hands.
Hopefully RC will have access to a good shop and tech. I travel three hours to the one I trust for the important stuff. Everything else I have learned to do myself as apperantly you have.
 
 
Here is my weapon of choice.
 
 
I use a floresent wrap and feletch my arrows. Typically I call the archery shop 3hrs. away and he builds a new string and ships it for me. He did have a video archery range but cost has made it unprofitable so I don't go there much any more. You can tell a man knows his stuff when he is booked full, three months before season opens.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
+1    +1    +1    +1    +1
 
That is the price I am paying for sticking with an aging bow. And I figured the newer bows were getting away from rustable components. I had heard recently that there was a matthews string that would fit my hoyt and was far less apt to need attention. A buddy has hunted matthews for 3yrs now and is going to something on this yrs line. I don't know which one yet, but I'm expecting it to be a great bow. I like this havoc so well that I'm not considering anything new for a while longer. It'll never be a compitition shooter but it's deadly in the right hands.
Hopefully RC will have access to a good shop and tech. I travel three hours to the one I trust for the important stuff. Everything else I have learned to do myself as apperantly you have.
 
 
Here is my weapon of choice.
 
 
I use a floresent wrap and feletch my arrows. Typically I call the archery shop 3hrs. away and he builds a new string and ships it for me. He did have a video archery range but cost has made it unprofitable so I don't go there much any more. You can tell a man knows his stuff when he is booked full, three months before season opens.
 
 
 
 


Edited by Sgt. D - July/13/2008 at 16:14
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I don't know what I did on that post, but I hope I don't do it again!
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Well ...........I don't know much about optics but I know a lot about this stuff !!
 
If you are just getting into compounds a single cam is a simpler system than a dual cam. There are binary or cam 1/2 type systems that work very well also. But a true two cam will require the most maintenance.
 
You can get into some single cams fairly inexpensive. Mathews introduced a line called Mission archery and a mission X3 is a pretty dran good bow for the $300 range. Single cams are easy to tune but they require long strings which are prone to creep. As mentioned above...........some high quality string sets will exhibit less creep but generally all have "some". One of the big factors with string creep is major temperature changes between going from hot to cold (like storing in the house and the using outside). String creep is not a big deal if it's not too bad............like said before..........you can make minor adjustments to your equipment and still shoot alright but lose some efficiency . Or you can take it to a shop and have them put a twist or two back in your strings/cables and straighten things out . Really.........once you learn how to do it ...........it's pretty simple to do yourself with a bow press .
 
If you need any help just hollar ...........I set up and tune my own bows, build my own arrows, etc.!! I have been hard core archery for about 10-11 years but just started getting a bug to shoot a rifle again..........so I am clueless about good rifles and optics !!
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Dose anyone use expandable broad heads? I have always used fix blades but would like to try them In 125gr. any thought on it?

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: July/22/2008 at 17:15
cbm View Drop Down
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I have used both fixed blades and expandables a lot !! Probably got 50-60 bowkills with nearly a combined dozen of different types of each !!
 
My go-to broadhead is the Spitfire 125 expandable. In my experience they are super realiable, tough ferrules, scary sharp, big cut, fly great, easy to change out blades, and I consistantly get the best bloodtrails with them (although there is always a random one that does not bleed much)!! I have killed deer just as dead with other brands ..............but for me..........it's hard to beat those Spitfires !!


Edited by cbm - July/22/2008 at 17:16
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: August/12/2008 at 13:00
Glock View Drop Down
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Well I can't call myself a bow hunter just yet, but i just bought a Mathews DXT. I'm hoping to be ready to hunt next year, I feel there is a lot to learn. Any words of wisdom or thoughts on the DXT?
 
Regards Chris 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/04/2008 at 10:35
Jeff H. View Drop Down
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Originally posted by Glock Glock wrote:

Well I can't call myself a bow hunter just yet, but i just bought a Mathews DXT. I'm hoping to be ready to hunt next year, I feel there is a lot to learn. Any words of wisdom or thoughts on the DXT?
 

Regards Chris 


have you tried out that DXT yet? how do you like it? i was looking at that one myself.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/04/2008 at 14:23
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Hi Jeff I cant say I know that much about bows , but it shoots like a dream. Since I bought one a few of my freinds have bought one as well, the guys that know a few things about bows say it is definately one of the best if not the best bow on the market. I would say buy it you wont be sorry.

Regards Chris
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/04/2008 at 16:02
Jeff H. View Drop Down
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thanks chris - that's good to know! it does look like a very nice bow
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/05/2008 at 09:01
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The DXT is a very nice bow with great features. It is a little small though and with the parrallel limbs gives a pretty steep string angle for people with long draw lengths(requires a peep to be very far from you eye, and can have some nock pinch). I think it's is about the perfect bow for treestand/groundblinds if you have a short draw length(probably 28" or less).
 
IMO the regular Drenaline is a better choice for 29-30" draw length guys that want a compact bow !
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/05/2008 at 15:20
Jeff H. View Drop Down
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i hadn't thought of that aspect. that's good to keep in mind.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/05/2008 at 17:48
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I've heard the Drenalin is much quieter than the DXT as well.
 
I have a Drenalin, and it's a great bow that shoots very well!
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/05/2008 at 20:33
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i think i'm going to go to an archery shop and check some of these out!
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