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Antis Seek Reloading Ban

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/23/2009 at 10:27
Chris Farris View Drop Down
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4/18/09 Gun Rights: Senate Must Reject Inter-American Arms Treaty
April 20, 2009
Summary

Obama has a new trick up his sleeve to ram gun control: Subvert the legislative process by ratifying an international treaty that would require anyone who reloads their own ammo to have a government license. And that's only the tip of the iceberg.

Having backed off--for now--from the politically difficult push for a ban of so-called "assault weapons," President Obama hopes to assuage Mexican President Felipe Calderón's disappointment with a promise to push the Senate to ratify the Inter-American Convention Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives and other Related Materials, a treaty signed in 1997, but never ratified in the U.S.

President Obama announced in a visit here today that he will push the U.S. Senate to ratify an inter-American arms trafficking treaty designed to curb the flow of guns and ammunition to drug cartels and other armed groups in the hemisphere.

Obama no doubt believes that ratification of this treaty is much more feasible than passage of a renewed AWB, and in that assessment he is almost certainly correct.  There is, for example, no indication to this point of any organized resistance to ratification of the treaty.  Although the NRA contests the Washington Post article's contention that it participated in the meeting at which the treaty was drafted, the NRA has not made clear that it has determined the treaty to be a threat to gun rights in the U.S., and thus something to be forcefully opposed.

Even a cursory glance at the text should convince any gun rights advocacy group (or individual) that this agreement is indeed dangerous to the rights of American gun owners.  This section stands out (emphasis added):

1. "Illicit manufacturing": the manufacture or assembly of firearms, ammunition, explosives, and other related materials:
a. from components or parts illicitly trafficked; or
b. without a license from a competent governmental authority of the State Party where the manufacture or assembly takes place; or
c. without marking the firearms that require marking at the time of manufacturing.

I can only assume that this would mandate that anyone who reloads ammunition to save money (and rather a lot of it, given today's ammo prices) acquire a government issued license to do so.  What about people who purchase incomplete firearms frames, treated under current U.S. law as inert hunks of metal, and complete the firearm themselves?  Would that now require licensing?  It certainly seems so.  Unacceptable.

The larger issue, of course, is that suddenly that which shall not be infringed would become subject to international regulation, and as restrictive as gun laws in the U.S. have become, they're still not draconian enough for the tastes of much of the rest of the world. 

That's their problem, and it needs to remain their problem.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: April/24/2009 at 10:54
Chris Farris View Drop Down
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> > Remember CANDIDATE Barack Obama? The guy who
> > "wasn't going to take away
> > our guns"?
> >
> > Well, guess what?
> >
> > Less than 100 days into his administration, he's never
> > met a gun he
> > didn't hate.
> >
> > A week ago, Obama went to Mexico, whined about the United
> > States, and
> > bemoaned (before the whole world) the fact that he
> > didn't have the
> > political power to take away our semi-automatics.
> > Nevertheless, that
> > didn't keep him from pushing additional restrictions on
> > American gun
> > owners.
> >
> > It's called the Inter-American Convention Against
> > Illicit Manufacturing
> > of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives, and
> > Other
> > Related Materials. To be sure, this imponderable title
> > masks a really
> > nasty piece of work.
> >
> > First of all, when the treaty purports to ban the
> > "illicit" manufacture
> > of firearms, what does that mean?
> >
> > 1. "Illicit manufacturing" of firearms is defined
> > as "assembly of
> > firearms [or] ammunition... without a license...."
> >
> > Hence, reloading ammunition -- or putting together a lawful
> > firearm from
> > a kit -- is clearly "illicit manufacturing."
> >
> > Modifying a firearm in any way would surely be
> > "illicit manufacturing."
> > And, while it would be a stretch, assembling a firearm
> > after cleaning it
> > could, in any plain reading of the words, come within the
> > screwy
> > definition of "illicit manufacturing."
> >
> > 2. "Firearm" has a similarly questionable
> > definition.
> >
> > "[A]ny other weapon" is a "firearm,"
> > according to the treaty -- and the
> > term "weapon" is nowhere defined.
> >
> > So, is a BB gun a "firearm"? Probably.
> >
> > A toy gun? Possibly.
> >
> > A pistol grip or firing pin? Probably. And who knows what
> > else.
> >
> > If these provisions (and others) become the law of the
> > land, the Obama
> > administration could have a heyday in enforcing them.
> > Consider some of
> > the other provisions in the treaty:
> >
> > * Banning Reloading. In Article IV of the treaty,
> > countries commit to
> > adopting "necessary legislative or other
> > measures" to criminalize
> > illicit manufacturing and trafficking in firearms.
> >
> > Remember that "illicit manufacturing" includes
> > reloading and modifying
> > or assembling a firearm in any way. This would mean that
> > the Obama
> > administration could promulgate regulations banning
> > reloading on the
> > basis of this treaty -- just as it is currently
> > circumventing Congress
> > to write legislation taxing greenhouse gases.
> >
> > * Banning Gun Clubs. Article IV goes on to state that the
> > criminalized
> > acts should include "association or conspiracy"
> > in connection with said
> > offenses -- which is arguably a term broad enough to allow,
> > by
> > regulation, the criminalization of entire pro-gun
> > organizations or gun
> > clubs, based on the facilities which they provide their
> > membership.
> >
> > * Extraditing US Gun Dealers. Article V requires each party
> > to "adopt
> > such measures as may be necessary to establish its
> > jurisdiction over the
> > offenses it has established in accordance with this
> > Convention" under a
> > variety of circumstances.
> >
> > We know that Mexico is blaming U.S. gun dealers for the
> > fact that its
> > streets are flowing with blood. And we know it is possible
> > for Mexico
> > to define offenses "committed in its territory"
> > in a very broad way.
> > And we know that we have an extradition obligation under
> > Article XIX of
> > the proposed treaty. So we know that Mexico could try to
> > use the treaty
> > to demand to extradition of American gun dealers.
> >
> > Under Article XXIX, if Mexico demands the extradition of a
> > lawful
> > American gun dealer, the U.S. would be required to resolve
> > the dispute
> > through "other means of peaceful settlement."
> >
> > Does anyone want to risk twenty years in a sweltering
> > Mexican jail on
> > the proposition that the Obama administration would apply
> > this provision
> > in a pro-gun manner?
> >
> > * Microstamping. Article VI requires "appropriate
> > markings" on
> > firearms. And, it is not inconceivable that this provision
> > could be
> > used to require microstamping of firearms and/or ammunition
> > -- a
> > requirement which is clearly intended to impose
> > specifications which are
> > not technologically possible or which are possible only at
> > a
> > prohibitively expensive cost.
> >
> > * Gun Registration. Article XI requires the maintenance of
> > any records,
> > for a "reasonable time," that the government
> > determines to be necessary
> > to trace firearms. This provision would almost certainly
> > repeal
> > portions of McClure-Volkmer and could arguably be used to
> > require a
> > national registry or database.
> >
> > ACTION: Write your Senators and urge them to oppose the
> > Inter-American
> > Convention Against Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking
> > in Firearms,
> > Ammunition, Explosives, and Other Related Materials.
> >
> > Please use the Gun Owners Legislative Action Center at
> > http://www.gunowners.org/activism.htm to send your Senators
> > the
> > pre-written e-mail message below.
> >
> > ----- Pre-written letter -----
> >
> > Dear Senator:
> >
> > I am urging you, in the strongest terms, to oppose the
> > Inter-American
> > Convention Against Illicit Manufacturing of a
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