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8x vs 10x (I know, I know)

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/24/2016 at 12:49
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"I learned about clarity while on an Antelope hunt in SD.
Looking at some large whitetails with my 10x50 Nikon binocular.
The Nikon failed to allow me identify the rack on the whitetails.
Where the tiny 7x20 lens in my Leica rangefinder the racks were clear and countable.
Glass quality trumps everything else."


Clean glass also has its virtues. Perhaps the Nikon lenses just needed to be cleaned up. :lol: 



Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: December/24/2016 at 13:06
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Originally posted by koshkin koshkin wrote:

Originally posted by PhilR. PhilR. wrote:

OP - you might research the term "twilight factor".  If you do so, you will find that JGRaider is correct.  Exit pupil is not the only thing that determines how much detail you can see.  And yes, I have tried the same exact scenario you describe, and I can tell you that you will be better off with a 10x.

And if brightness becomes an issue, you could always go with a 10x50, and be where you would have been with an 8x42.  Actually, IMO any hunter that is worried about 10x brightness should be going with a 50mm anyway.......


Twilight factor in this case is only applicable if you eye pupils do not dilate beyond 4mm or so.  If they do, you can throw the whole twilight factor business out.

ILya


Here's some quotes, from "How to Choose Binoculars", by Alan R. Hale, 1991, regarding Twilight Factor:

This formula (T.F.) takes magnification more into account than the Relative Brightness Index (R.B.I.)
and is a better indicator of brightness.
It has been proven that when observing low contrast subject matter during twilight (not in the dark) higher magnifications will increase contrast and more detail will be seen.

The bold lettering was in his book.

Stan

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